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Top of Mind with Julie Rose

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Top of Mind with Julie Rose
Top of Mind with Julie Rose

Top of Mind with Julie Rose

BYUradio

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Followers
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Plays
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Smart, informative conversations and interviews that go beyond mere headlines and sound bites.

Latest Episodes

Deadly Asteroids, End of Life Care, Teaching Robots

NASA Practicing Techniques for Countering Deadly Asteroids(0:40) Guest: Richard Binzel, PhD, Professor of Planetary Science, MIT In early August, NASA put out a startling press release announcing that an asteroid the size of a football field had just barely missed colliding with Earth. All of NASA’s monitoring systems had failed to notice the asteroid was coming. If it had hit us, it would have obliterated everything within 50 miles of the impact, says NASA. Coincidentally, NASA held a Planetary Defense Conference a few months earlier to plan for just that kind of scenario. They ran a simulation in which scientists launched six imaginary spacecraft at the imaginary asteroid, hoping to knock it off course. But instead, a chunk split off the asteroid and ended up destroying half of Manhattan. MIT planetary scientist Richard Binzel participated in the practice run of NASA’s plan to protect us from an asteroid strike. (Originally aired June 18, 2019) Dealing with Dementia(16:19) Guest: Anne Kenny, MD, Professor Emerita, University of Connecticut Health Center. Author of “Making Tough Decisions about End-of-Life Care in Dementia” Dementia diagnoses hit 500,000 Americans a year –but that number is only the beginning. There are usually several family members who suffer alongside the dementia patient, and it is no easy task for them to get through the experience with their sanity and relationships intact. Anyone embarking on that journey could use a guide. (Originally aired November 21, 2018) Training Robots Just Like We Train(39:29) Guest: Matthew E. Taylor, assistant professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Washington State University In the not-too-distant future, when robots are cooking our meals and cleaning our houses, how do you suppose we’ll train them to do things the way we like them? To add that extra dash of spices right at the end? Or tuck the bed sheet corners in the way we like them? Goodness knows I’ve struggled to get my smart phone set up just the way I like it. . . I can only imagine what challenge a robot maid might present. This is the riddle Matthew Taylor is tackling at Washington State University’s School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, where he’s a professor. He thinks maybe training a robot will be similar to training a dog. (Originally aired June 21, 2016) Are 16-year-olds Mature Enough to Vote?(51:10) Guest: Takoma Park Mayor Kate Stewart & Former Takoma Park Youth Council Chairperson Kiran Kochar McCabe Many of the young activists who’ve been joining immigration and climate protests over the last few years will still be too young to vote come the 2020 election. The national voting age is 18. But states can let younger people vote in statewide elections. City governments can do the same thing for citywide elections. Takoma Park, Maryland, which is a suburb of Washington, DC, six years ago became the first city to lower its local election voting age to 16, despite concerns that kids that young aren’t mature enough to cast an informed vote. (Originally aired August 13, 2018) New DNA Sequencing Technique Diagnoses Diseases Better(1:10:59) Guest: Charles Chiu, MD, Professor of Laboratory Medicine and Infectious Diseases at the University of California at San Francisco There’s a fair amount of guesswork and trial-and-error in treating a patient with a mysterious infectious disease. Even when you’ve got what looks like a common cold or flu virus, a test can take days to come back with enough specifics to guide your doctor on which medicine to prescribe. In critically ill patients, where the infection is moving fast and time is short, doctors need better options. (Originally aired July 8, 2019) The Forgotten Homeless(1:25:31) Guest: Graham Pruss, Researcher, University of Washington's Interdisciplinary Critical Narratives Team and Homeless Research Initiative Big cities with expensive housing across the country are seeing a rise in the number of people living in their car

-1 s2 d ago
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Deadly Asteroids, End of Life Care, Teaching Robots

Impeachment, Syria, Machias Island

What is the Legal, Constitutional Way to Do Impeachment, and Are Democrats Doing It? (0:35) Guest: Chris Karpowitz, PhD, Professor of Political Science, BYU; Frederick Gedicks, JD, Professor of Law, BYU President Trump has called the impeachment inquiry currently underway by House Democrats “illegal, invalid, unconstitutional” and another word we can’t say on the air. He, his personal attorney Rudy Giuliani and Vice President Mike Pence have all announced they will not respond to subpoenas from the House for information or testimony. One of their key complaints is that the House of Representatives has not held a vote on initiating the impeachment inquiry. Assad Has Won the Syrian War. But “The Revolution is an Idea and Ideas Don’t Die.” (21:03) Guest: Wendy Pearlman, PhD, Professor of Middle East Politics, Northwestern University, Author “We Crossed a Bridge and It Trembled” As US troops withdraw from Northeastern Syria this week, Turkish are attacking Kurdish forces there a...

-1 s3 d ago
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Impeachment, Syria, Machias Island

China Censorship, Proving Einstein Right, Buying a Park

To Be Big in China Requires Playing by China’s Censorship Rules (0:32) Guest: Stanley Rosen, Professor of Political Science and International Relations, University of Southern California Fresh back from a couple of exhibition games in China this week, NBA star LeBron James set off a fire storm with his reaction to a tweet that had set off an earlier firestorm. “You know when you’re misinformed or you’re not educated about something –and I’m just talking about the tweet itself –you never know the ramifications that can happen. And you know we all seen what that did.” The tweet was fairly short and quickly deleted. It was posted by the general manager of the Houston Rockets and it read “Fight for Freedom. Stand with Hong Kong.” China’s communist government immediately condemned the tweet –it sees the Hong Kong protests as a violent separatist movement. The timing was bad, because LeBron’s LA Lakers and the Brooklyn Nets were just about to head off to China for some pre-se...

-1 s4 d ago
Comments
China Censorship, Proving Einstein Right, Buying a Park

Segregation By Design, Choice Overload, Psychopaths

How Local Governments Reinforce Segregation in Favor of White Homeowners (0:31) Guest: Jessica Trounstine, PhD, Professor of Political Science, University of California–Merced, Author of “Segregation by Design” Is the neighbor who lives next door the same race as you? How about the people living on the next block? Or a mile away, in your same town? Chances are pretty good that you live in a community where most everyone is your same race. Despite decades of anti-discrimination laws and policies, America remains deeply segregated. Is it that deep down, we’re all impossibly racist? No, political scientist Jessica Trounstine says our city and county governments have played an important role in shaping these patterns. Are More Choices Better... Or Worse? (20:30) Guest: Thomas Saltsman, Senior Lab Director, Social Psychophysiology Laboratory, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York You’re studying the menu at a new restaurant you’ve heard great things about. The men...

-1 s5 d ago
Comments
Segregation By Design, Choice Overload, Psychopaths

Minorities At Risk, Processed Food, Climbing Trees

Minorities at Risk around the World Guest: Quinn Mecham, Professor of Political Science, BYU The weekend brought some dramatic developments along Syria’s border with Turkey. Turkish forces invaded towns held by Syrian Kurds, who had been key allies of the US in the fight against ISIS. President Donald Trump has ordered US forces to withdraw from the area. And so, the Kurds have turned to the Syrian government of Bashar al Assad for support in fighting the Turks. Processing Processed Food Guilt Guest: Ruth MacDonald, Department Chair / CALS Assistant Dean of Graduate Programs, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Iowa State University Processed food is making us overweight and destroying our gut microbiome. I’ve heard so many versions of that, I feel a bit guilty whenever I eat something that comes in a package. Especially if it’s a snack food. But what exactly is it about processed foods that’s so bad? Connecting with Nature through Professional Tree Climbing Guest: T...

-1 s6 d ago
Comments
Minorities At Risk, Processed Food, Climbing Trees

True Crime Podcasts, World Wide Hum, Spanish Flu

Making A True-Crime Podcast (0:34) Guest: Dave Cawley, investigative reporter and host of the COLD podcast for KSL News The creators of the true-crime podcast COLD revealed new information this week. The viral podcast is about the unsolved 2009 disappearance of Susan Powell. (Originally aired March 7, 2019) Have You Heard the Hum? Several Theories Try to Explain This Mysterious Noise (16:37) Guest: Glen MacPherson, Director of the World Hum Map and Database Project All around the world, people claim to hear a persistent low humming noise that’s sometimes known as the World Hum. Not everyone can hear it. Just some people. The noise usually follows them wherever they go. Glen Macpherson built a steel box to see if he could block out the humming. But even inside of it, the noise was there. MacPherson is not a conspiracy theorist –though there are plenty of those chasing down the world hum. MacPherson’s take is more scientific. He’s a high school science and math teacher and directo...

-1 s1 w ago
Comments
True Crime Podcasts, World Wide Hum, Spanish Flu

California Fires, Money Laundering, Argentina

What Deliberate Power Outages in California Have to Do With Wildfire Risk Guest: Bruce Cain, PhD, Professor of Political Science, Senior Fellow, Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment There’s a high risk of wildfire in Northern California right now because of strong winds and dry conditions. So PG&E –California’s largest utility –has deliberately cut power to as many has 800,000 customers over the last two days, spanning 21 counties including parts of the San Francisco Bay Area. Equipment owned and maintained by PG&E has sparked many of California’s major wildfires recently, including the state’s deadliest and destructive blaze –the Camp Fire which destroyed the town of Paradise last year and killed 86 people. How to Fight Dirty Money Guest: Channing Mavrellis, Director, Global Financial Integrity’s Transnational Crime Program Around the world, there are countries-sometimes called “developing” or “emerging” -that receive millions of dollars in foreign aid and inves...

-1 s1 w ago
Comments
California Fires, Money Laundering, Argentina

Healthcare Myths, Python Hunting, Hmong Stories

Lots of Our Assumptions about America’s Healthcare System Are Wrong Guest: Arthur Garson, MD, Director, Health Policy Institute, Texas Medical Center, Co-Author of “Exposing the 20 Medical Myths: Why Everything You Know About Health Care is Wrong and How to Make it Right.” Twenty-five cents out of every dollar Americans spend on healthcare is wasted, according to a study published this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association. That wasted money isn’t making us any healthier. It’s not improving the quality of the care we receive. It’s just down the drain. How can the richest, most developed country in the world be so wasteful when it comes to the thing that matters most to us? Well, for one thing, pediatric cardiologist Arthur Garson says we’re holding on to a lot of misconceptions about how health care works in America. Veterans Hunt Invasive Florida Pythons Guest: Tom Rahill, Founder, Swamp Apes Florida’s Everglades are crawling with thousands of Burmese Pyth...

-1 s1 w ago
Comments
Healthcare Myths, Python Hunting, Hmong Stories

Statelessness, China Censorship, VR for Seniors

Why Statelessness Is On the Rise Globally Guest: Fernand de Varennes, United Nations Special Rapporteur on Minority Issues Around the world there are at least 10 million people who are “stateless,” according to the United Nations. Which means, they belong nowhere. They’re not simply refugees or individuals living without citizenship status in a country. These stateless individuals have no “home” to go back to, even if they wanted to. How the Chinese Government Controls Information Guest: Margaret (Molly) Roberts, Professor of Political Science, University of California, San Diego The ongoing –and increasingly violent –pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong are testing China’s ability to censor information within its borders. Outside of China it’s easy to find social media posts and news articles that depict the Hong Kong protestors as young people exercising their democratic right to demand more freedom. Inside China, the government controls the media and censors the internet,...

-1 s1 w ago
Comments
Statelessness, China Censorship, VR for Seniors

Affirmative Action, Little Free Library, Plastic Recycling

Asian Americans Divided On Affirmative Action Guest: Van C. Tran, PhD, Associate Professor of Sociology, The Graduate Center, CUNY Last week, Harvard won the lawsuit brought against it by a group of Asian Americans challenging the school’s admissions policies. The students claim Harvard requires Asian applicants to clear a higher bar than applicants of other races. Having lost this first round, the students are appealing in hopes of eventually landing at the US Supreme Court. What makes this case unusual is that typically affirmative action policies are challenged by white people. Here, it’s Asian Americans making the claim that affirmative action is harming them –and that’s controversial within the Asian American community. Little Free Libraries Bring Free Books to Neighborhoods Near You Guest: Margret Aldrich, Media and Programming Manager at Little Free Library, Author of "The Little Free Library Book" You may have come across a birdhouse-shaped box with books inside and a si...

-1 s1 w ago
Comments
Affirmative Action, Little Free Library, Plastic Recycling

Latest Episodes

Deadly Asteroids, End of Life Care, Teaching Robots

NASA Practicing Techniques for Countering Deadly Asteroids(0:40) Guest: Richard Binzel, PhD, Professor of Planetary Science, MIT In early August, NASA put out a startling press release announcing that an asteroid the size of a football field had just barely missed colliding with Earth. All of NASA’s monitoring systems had failed to notice the asteroid was coming. If it had hit us, it would have obliterated everything within 50 miles of the impact, says NASA. Coincidentally, NASA held a Planetary Defense Conference a few months earlier to plan for just that kind of scenario. They ran a simulation in which scientists launched six imaginary spacecraft at the imaginary asteroid, hoping to knock it off course. But instead, a chunk split off the asteroid and ended up destroying half of Manhattan. MIT planetary scientist Richard Binzel participated in the practice run of NASA’s plan to protect us from an asteroid strike. (Originally aired June 18, 2019) Dealing with Dementia(16:19) Guest: Anne Kenny, MD, Professor Emerita, University of Connecticut Health Center. Author of “Making Tough Decisions about End-of-Life Care in Dementia” Dementia diagnoses hit 500,000 Americans a year –but that number is only the beginning. There are usually several family members who suffer alongside the dementia patient, and it is no easy task for them to get through the experience with their sanity and relationships intact. Anyone embarking on that journey could use a guide. (Originally aired November 21, 2018) Training Robots Just Like We Train(39:29) Guest: Matthew E. Taylor, assistant professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Washington State University In the not-too-distant future, when robots are cooking our meals and cleaning our houses, how do you suppose we’ll train them to do things the way we like them? To add that extra dash of spices right at the end? Or tuck the bed sheet corners in the way we like them? Goodness knows I’ve struggled to get my smart phone set up just the way I like it. . . I can only imagine what challenge a robot maid might present. This is the riddle Matthew Taylor is tackling at Washington State University’s School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, where he’s a professor. He thinks maybe training a robot will be similar to training a dog. (Originally aired June 21, 2016) Are 16-year-olds Mature Enough to Vote?(51:10) Guest: Takoma Park Mayor Kate Stewart & Former Takoma Park Youth Council Chairperson Kiran Kochar McCabe Many of the young activists who’ve been joining immigration and climate protests over the last few years will still be too young to vote come the 2020 election. The national voting age is 18. But states can let younger people vote in statewide elections. City governments can do the same thing for citywide elections. Takoma Park, Maryland, which is a suburb of Washington, DC, six years ago became the first city to lower its local election voting age to 16, despite concerns that kids that young aren’t mature enough to cast an informed vote. (Originally aired August 13, 2018) New DNA Sequencing Technique Diagnoses Diseases Better(1:10:59) Guest: Charles Chiu, MD, Professor of Laboratory Medicine and Infectious Diseases at the University of California at San Francisco There’s a fair amount of guesswork and trial-and-error in treating a patient with a mysterious infectious disease. Even when you’ve got what looks like a common cold or flu virus, a test can take days to come back with enough specifics to guide your doctor on which medicine to prescribe. In critically ill patients, where the infection is moving fast and time is short, doctors need better options. (Originally aired July 8, 2019) The Forgotten Homeless(1:25:31) Guest: Graham Pruss, Researcher, University of Washington's Interdisciplinary Critical Narratives Team and Homeless Research Initiative Big cities with expensive housing across the country are seeing a rise in the number of people living in their car

-1 s2 d ago
Comments
Deadly Asteroids, End of Life Care, Teaching Robots

Impeachment, Syria, Machias Island

What is the Legal, Constitutional Way to Do Impeachment, and Are Democrats Doing It? (0:35) Guest: Chris Karpowitz, PhD, Professor of Political Science, BYU; Frederick Gedicks, JD, Professor of Law, BYU President Trump has called the impeachment inquiry currently underway by House Democrats “illegal, invalid, unconstitutional” and another word we can’t say on the air. He, his personal attorney Rudy Giuliani and Vice President Mike Pence have all announced they will not respond to subpoenas from the House for information or testimony. One of their key complaints is that the House of Representatives has not held a vote on initiating the impeachment inquiry. Assad Has Won the Syrian War. But “The Revolution is an Idea and Ideas Don’t Die.” (21:03) Guest: Wendy Pearlman, PhD, Professor of Middle East Politics, Northwestern University, Author “We Crossed a Bridge and It Trembled” As US troops withdraw from Northeastern Syria this week, Turkish are attacking Kurdish forces there a...

-1 s3 d ago
Comments
Impeachment, Syria, Machias Island

China Censorship, Proving Einstein Right, Buying a Park

To Be Big in China Requires Playing by China’s Censorship Rules (0:32) Guest: Stanley Rosen, Professor of Political Science and International Relations, University of Southern California Fresh back from a couple of exhibition games in China this week, NBA star LeBron James set off a fire storm with his reaction to a tweet that had set off an earlier firestorm. “You know when you’re misinformed or you’re not educated about something –and I’m just talking about the tweet itself –you never know the ramifications that can happen. And you know we all seen what that did.” The tweet was fairly short and quickly deleted. It was posted by the general manager of the Houston Rockets and it read “Fight for Freedom. Stand with Hong Kong.” China’s communist government immediately condemned the tweet –it sees the Hong Kong protests as a violent separatist movement. The timing was bad, because LeBron’s LA Lakers and the Brooklyn Nets were just about to head off to China for some pre-se...

-1 s4 d ago
Comments
China Censorship, Proving Einstein Right, Buying a Park

Segregation By Design, Choice Overload, Psychopaths

How Local Governments Reinforce Segregation in Favor of White Homeowners (0:31) Guest: Jessica Trounstine, PhD, Professor of Political Science, University of California–Merced, Author of “Segregation by Design” Is the neighbor who lives next door the same race as you? How about the people living on the next block? Or a mile away, in your same town? Chances are pretty good that you live in a community where most everyone is your same race. Despite decades of anti-discrimination laws and policies, America remains deeply segregated. Is it that deep down, we’re all impossibly racist? No, political scientist Jessica Trounstine says our city and county governments have played an important role in shaping these patterns. Are More Choices Better... Or Worse? (20:30) Guest: Thomas Saltsman, Senior Lab Director, Social Psychophysiology Laboratory, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York You’re studying the menu at a new restaurant you’ve heard great things about. The men...

-1 s5 d ago
Comments
Segregation By Design, Choice Overload, Psychopaths

Minorities At Risk, Processed Food, Climbing Trees

Minorities at Risk around the World Guest: Quinn Mecham, Professor of Political Science, BYU The weekend brought some dramatic developments along Syria’s border with Turkey. Turkish forces invaded towns held by Syrian Kurds, who had been key allies of the US in the fight against ISIS. President Donald Trump has ordered US forces to withdraw from the area. And so, the Kurds have turned to the Syrian government of Bashar al Assad for support in fighting the Turks. Processing Processed Food Guilt Guest: Ruth MacDonald, Department Chair / CALS Assistant Dean of Graduate Programs, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Iowa State University Processed food is making us overweight and destroying our gut microbiome. I’ve heard so many versions of that, I feel a bit guilty whenever I eat something that comes in a package. Especially if it’s a snack food. But what exactly is it about processed foods that’s so bad? Connecting with Nature through Professional Tree Climbing Guest: T...

-1 s6 d ago
Comments
Minorities At Risk, Processed Food, Climbing Trees

True Crime Podcasts, World Wide Hum, Spanish Flu

Making A True-Crime Podcast (0:34) Guest: Dave Cawley, investigative reporter and host of the COLD podcast for KSL News The creators of the true-crime podcast COLD revealed new information this week. The viral podcast is about the unsolved 2009 disappearance of Susan Powell. (Originally aired March 7, 2019) Have You Heard the Hum? Several Theories Try to Explain This Mysterious Noise (16:37) Guest: Glen MacPherson, Director of the World Hum Map and Database Project All around the world, people claim to hear a persistent low humming noise that’s sometimes known as the World Hum. Not everyone can hear it. Just some people. The noise usually follows them wherever they go. Glen Macpherson built a steel box to see if he could block out the humming. But even inside of it, the noise was there. MacPherson is not a conspiracy theorist –though there are plenty of those chasing down the world hum. MacPherson’s take is more scientific. He’s a high school science and math teacher and directo...

-1 s1 w ago
Comments
True Crime Podcasts, World Wide Hum, Spanish Flu

California Fires, Money Laundering, Argentina

What Deliberate Power Outages in California Have to Do With Wildfire Risk Guest: Bruce Cain, PhD, Professor of Political Science, Senior Fellow, Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment There’s a high risk of wildfire in Northern California right now because of strong winds and dry conditions. So PG&E –California’s largest utility –has deliberately cut power to as many has 800,000 customers over the last two days, spanning 21 counties including parts of the San Francisco Bay Area. Equipment owned and maintained by PG&E has sparked many of California’s major wildfires recently, including the state’s deadliest and destructive blaze –the Camp Fire which destroyed the town of Paradise last year and killed 86 people. How to Fight Dirty Money Guest: Channing Mavrellis, Director, Global Financial Integrity’s Transnational Crime Program Around the world, there are countries-sometimes called “developing” or “emerging” -that receive millions of dollars in foreign aid and inves...

-1 s1 w ago
Comments
California Fires, Money Laundering, Argentina

Healthcare Myths, Python Hunting, Hmong Stories

Lots of Our Assumptions about America’s Healthcare System Are Wrong Guest: Arthur Garson, MD, Director, Health Policy Institute, Texas Medical Center, Co-Author of “Exposing the 20 Medical Myths: Why Everything You Know About Health Care is Wrong and How to Make it Right.” Twenty-five cents out of every dollar Americans spend on healthcare is wasted, according to a study published this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association. That wasted money isn’t making us any healthier. It’s not improving the quality of the care we receive. It’s just down the drain. How can the richest, most developed country in the world be so wasteful when it comes to the thing that matters most to us? Well, for one thing, pediatric cardiologist Arthur Garson says we’re holding on to a lot of misconceptions about how health care works in America. Veterans Hunt Invasive Florida Pythons Guest: Tom Rahill, Founder, Swamp Apes Florida’s Everglades are crawling with thousands of Burmese Pyth...

-1 s1 w ago
Comments
Healthcare Myths, Python Hunting, Hmong Stories

Statelessness, China Censorship, VR for Seniors

Why Statelessness Is On the Rise Globally Guest: Fernand de Varennes, United Nations Special Rapporteur on Minority Issues Around the world there are at least 10 million people who are “stateless,” according to the United Nations. Which means, they belong nowhere. They’re not simply refugees or individuals living without citizenship status in a country. These stateless individuals have no “home” to go back to, even if they wanted to. How the Chinese Government Controls Information Guest: Margaret (Molly) Roberts, Professor of Political Science, University of California, San Diego The ongoing –and increasingly violent –pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong are testing China’s ability to censor information within its borders. Outside of China it’s easy to find social media posts and news articles that depict the Hong Kong protestors as young people exercising their democratic right to demand more freedom. Inside China, the government controls the media and censors the internet,...

-1 s1 w ago
Comments
Statelessness, China Censorship, VR for Seniors

Affirmative Action, Little Free Library, Plastic Recycling

Asian Americans Divided On Affirmative Action Guest: Van C. Tran, PhD, Associate Professor of Sociology, The Graduate Center, CUNY Last week, Harvard won the lawsuit brought against it by a group of Asian Americans challenging the school’s admissions policies. The students claim Harvard requires Asian applicants to clear a higher bar than applicants of other races. Having lost this first round, the students are appealing in hopes of eventually landing at the US Supreme Court. What makes this case unusual is that typically affirmative action policies are challenged by white people. Here, it’s Asian Americans making the claim that affirmative action is harming them –and that’s controversial within the Asian American community. Little Free Libraries Bring Free Books to Neighborhoods Near You Guest: Margret Aldrich, Media and Programming Manager at Little Free Library, Author of "The Little Free Library Book" You may have come across a birdhouse-shaped box with books inside and a si...

-1 s1 w ago
Comments
Affirmative Action, Little Free Library, Plastic Recycling