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fiction/non/fiction

fiction/non/fiction

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5
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fiction/non/fiction
fiction/non/fiction

fiction/non/fiction

fiction/non/fiction

9
Followers
5
Plays
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About Us

Hosted by Whitney Terrell and V.V. Ganeshananthan, fiction/non/fiction interprets current events through the lens of literature, and features conversations with writers of all stripes, from novelists and poets to journalists and essayists.

Latest Episodes

An American Abroad: Deborah Landau and Mathangi Subramanian on Expat Writing

In this episode, poet Deborah Landau and novelist Mathangi Subramanian talk to Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast co-hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell about their writing lives as Americans abroad. From exploring Paris's rich expat literary history to witnessing the diversity of slums in India, Landau and Subramanian discuss what they found when they began writing in unfamiliar places. Guests:Deborah LandauMathangi SubramanianReadings for the Episode:Deborah LandauOrchideliriumThe Last Usable HourThe Uses of the BodySoft TargetsMathangi SubramanianA People’s History of HeavenThe Day My Outrage Went Viral, Zora Magazine, Aug. 2Picturing Change photography project (Greeshma Patel)Others:A Moveable Feast by Ernest HemingwayBehind the Beautiful Forevers by Katherine BooHow To Write About Africa by Binyavanga Wainaina, GrantaLearn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

70 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
An American Abroad: Deborah Landau and Mathangi Subramanian on Expat Writing

On Whiteness Part 2: Jess Row and Timothy Yu Talk Writing About Race

In the second half of a special two-part episode, novelist and critic Jess Row and poet and critic Tim Yu talk to Fiction/Non/Fiction co-hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell about writing about whiteness in America. Who gets to participate in cultural criticism, and why? Who gets reviewed by and compared to whom, and why? How can white writers render and challenge their communities’ part in the country’s history of racism? Row and Yu also share their responses to Bob Hicok’s recent essay about diversity in poetry. (Find Part I here.)Guests:Jess RowTim YuReadings for the Episode:Jess RowWhite FlightsYour Face in Mine“What Are White Writers For?” in The New Republic, Sept. 30, 2016“Native Sons: A straight white American man on loving James Baldwin and learning to write about race” in Guernica, Aug. 13, 2013“A Safe Space for Racism,” in The New Republic, Nov. 23, 2016Tim Yu"The Case of the 'Disappearing' Poet: Why did a white poet see the success of writers of color as a signal of his own demise?" The New Republic, August 7, 2019White Poets Want Chinese Culture Without Chinese People Calvin Trillin's "Have They Run Out of Provinces Yet?" is the latest in a long artistic tradition. The New Republic, April 8, 2016,100 Chinese SilencesWhitney TerrellThe King of Kings CountyOthers:White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism by Robin DiAngelo (book)"The Authentic Outsider: Bill Cheng, Anthony Marra, and the freedom to write what you don’t know," by V.V. Ganeshananthan“The Dominance of the White Male Critic,” by Elizabeth Méndez Berry and Chi-hui Yang, The New York Times, July 5, 2019"The Promise of American Poetry," by Bob Hicok, Utne Reader, Summer 2019 (originally appeared in Michigan Quarterly Review, Winter 2018)Race, Real Estate, and Uneven Development: The Kansas City Experience, 1900-2010 by Kevin Fox GothamPlaying in the Dark: Whiteness in the literary imagination by Toni MorrisonWhite People by Allan GurganusLiterary Color Lines: On Inclusion in Publishing Fiction/Non/Fiction #8: Dhonielle Clayton and Ayesha Pande Talk Sensitivity Reading January 11, 2018Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

58 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
On Whiteness Part 2: Jess Row and Timothy Yu Talk Writing About Race

On Whiteness Part I: Jess Row and Timothy Yu Talk Writing About Race

In the first half of a special two-part episode, novelist and critic Jess Row and poet and critic Tim Yu talk to Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast co-hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell about writing about whiteness in America. How can white writers render their communities’ part in the country’s history of racism, and also challenge them? Row and Yu also share their responses to Bob Hicok’s recent Utne Reader essay about diversity in poetry.To hear the full episode, subscribe to the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (make sure to include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below.Guests:Jess RowTim YuReadings for the Episode:Jess RowWhite FlightsYour Face in Mine“What Are White Writers For?” in The New Republic, Sept. 30, 2016“Native Sons: A straight white American man on loving James Baldwin and learning to write about race” in Guernica, Aug. 13, 2013T...

71 MIN3 weeks ago
Comments
On Whiteness Part I: Jess Row and Timothy Yu Talk Writing About Race

The Iranian Revolution at 40: Jasmin Darznik and Dina Nayeri On the Anniversary of the Republic

In this episode of the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast, Iranian-American novelists and memoirists Jasmin Darznik and Dina Nayeri talk to hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell about the 40th anniversary of the Iranian Revolution. How has the country changed in four decades, and what is it like to write about the preceding and subsequent history?Guests:Jasmin DarznikDina NayeriReadings for the Episode:Jasmin DarznikThe Good Daughter: A Memoir of My Mother’s Hidden LifeSong of a Captive Bird***Dina NayeriA Teaspoon of Earth and SeaRefugeThe Ungrateful Refugee: What Immigrants Never Tell YouThe ungrateful refugee: ‘We have no debt to repay’, April 4, 2017, The GuardianOthers: Forugh ForrokhzadLearn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

72 MINAUG 8
Comments
The Iranian Revolution at 40: Jasmin Darznik and Dina Nayeri On the Anniversary of the Republic

Space is the Place: Jonathan Fetter-Vorm and Mary Anne Mohanraj on the 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11's Moon Landing

In this episode of the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast, author and illustrator Jonathan Fetter-Vorm and science fiction writer Mary Anne Mohanraj talk to hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell about the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing and how space exploration has been rendered in images, nonfiction, and fiction. What has been erased from the history of space exploration, and what might the future hold? Guests:Jonathan Fetter-VormMary Anne MohanrajReadings for the Episode:By Jonathan Fetter-VormMoonbound: Apollo 11 and the Dream of SpaceflightTrinity: A Graphic History of the First Atomic BombBattle Lines: A Graphic History of the Civil War“To the Moon, but Not Back: You might be surprised what humans left behind on the lunar surface,” The New York Times, July 19, 2019By Mary Anne MohanrajLinks to Mary Anne Mohanraj’s Jump Spacestories, minus The Stars Change:The Stars ChangeOthers:Carrying the Fire by Michael CollinsHidden Figures by Margot ShetterlyThe Right Stuffby Tom WolfeApollo 13 (film)Apollo 13 by James Lovell and Jeffrey Kluger“To Make It to the Moon, Women Have to Escape Earth’s Gender Bias,” by Mary Robinette KowalMary Robinette Kowal on Twitter about peeing in space“Captain Marvel,” (film)“Star Wars (A New Hope)” (film)Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

68 MINJUL 25
Comments
Space is the Place: Jonathan Fetter-Vorm and Mary Anne Mohanraj on the 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11's Moon Landing

21: The Military in a Time of Trump: Elliot Ackerman and Anuradha Bhagwati on the Armed Services Past and Future

In this episode of the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast, novelist Elliot Ackerman and memoirist Anuradha Bhagwati talk about how the military has—and hasn’t—changed during Donald Trump’s time as Commander in Chief. They also discuss their own experiences as Marines, the history of the American military, and how its future may affect the country and the world.To hear the full episode, subscribe to the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (make sure to include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below.Guests:Elliot AckermanAnuradha BhagwatiReadings for the Episode:Waiting for Eden: a novel, by Elliot AckermanPlaces and Names: On War, Revolution, and Returning, by Elliot AckermanDark at the Crossing: A Novel, by Elliot AckermanGreen on Blue: A Novel, by Elliot AckermanUnbecoming: A Memoir of Disobedience, by Anuradha Bhagwati“What to Make of Military Endorsements,” by Elliot Ackerman, The New Yorker, Sept. 8, 2016“A Former Marine Looks Back on Her Life in a Male-Dominated Military,” by V. V. Ganeshananthan, The New York Times, April 21, 2019The Good Lieutenant, by Whitney Terrell“Donald Trump’s ‘Salute to America’ Was Not a Complete Authoritarian Nightmare,” by Joshua Keating, July 4, 2019, Slate.comFields of Fire by Jim WebbThe Things They Carriedby Tim O’BrienLearn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

70 MINJUL 11
Comments
21: The Military in a Time of Trump: Elliot Ackerman and Anuradha Bhagwati on the Armed Services Past and Future

A Court Supreme: Irin Carmon and Jay Wexler on Writing About SCOTUS and Justice in Fiction and Nonfiction

In this episode of the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast, New York Magazine senior correspondent Irin Carmon (co-author of Notorious RBG) and novelist and Boston University law professor Jay Wexler (author of Tuttle in the Balance) talk about news coverage and fictional depictions of the Supreme Court. How partisan is the Court becoming? Why use humor to write fiction about the nine Justices? Ruth Bader Ginsburg was Vladimir Nabokov’s student—what effect has this had on her writing, and how are she and other liberal justices contending with their Trump-appointed colleagues?Guests:● Irin Carmon● Jay Wexler Readings for the Episode:● Irin Carmon’s archive at New York Magazine ● “Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Clarence Thomas Are Officially at War Over Abortion,” The Cut, May 28, 2019, by Irin Carmon● “The big cases: Here are the U.S. Supreme Court’s most consequential cases in its current term, which runs from Oct. 2018 to June 2019.” By Han Huang, Lawrence Hurley and Andrew Chung, Reuters Graphics● Tuttle in the Balance, by Jay Wexler● The Adventures of Ed Tuttle, Associate Justice, and Other Stories, by Jay Wexler● Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburgby Irin Carmon, Shana Knizhnik● Supreme Courtship by Christopher Buckley● Our Non-Christian Nation: How Atheists, Satanists, Pagans, and Others Are Demanding Their Rightful Place in Public Lifeby Jay Wexler● Ari Richter, artist● “The Census Case Is Shaping Up to Be the Biggest Travesty Since Bush v. Gore,” by Richard L. Hasen, Slate, June 25, 2019Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

70 MINJUN 27
Comments
A Court Supreme: Irin Carmon and Jay Wexler on Writing About SCOTUS and Justice in Fiction and Nonfiction

Podcasting Pro Tips and Jonny Diamond on Creating LitHub Radio

In this episode of the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast, Whitney Terrell and V.V. Ganeshananthan share how they started the podcast, and offer podcasting tips with some help from friends who host their own shows. Then LitHub.com editor-in-chief Jonny Diamond speaks about the launch of LitHub Radio and his five-year anniversary as LitHub.com’s content czar, as well as his own writing. To hear the full episode, subscribe to the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (make sure to include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Guests:● Jonny Diamond● Tanzila “Taz” Ahmed, David Naimon, Zahir Janmohamed, and Connor Stratton (via AWP)Readings for the Episode:● The Power of Facebook: How Big is Too Big? Alexis C. Madrigal and Alexander Chee on the Darker Side Social Media, Fiction/Non/Fiction Episode 3, Season 1● What Facebook Did to American Democracy by Alexis C. Madr...

71 MINJUN 13
Comments
Podcasting Pro Tips and Jonny Diamond on Creating LitHub Radio

Slouching Toward Gilead: Anjali Enjeti and Lacy Johnson on the new anti-abortion laws

In this episode of the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast, Anjali Enjeti and Lacy Johnson speak with hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell about recent news and legislation about abortion, as well as its depiction in literature and film. Guests:● Lacy Johnson● Anjali Enjeti Readings for the Episode: ● “Is Masculinity a Terrorist Ideology? Lacy Johnson on Rachel Louise Snyder and the Ways We Name Violence,” on LitHub● The Reckonings by Lacy Johnson● “Governor Kemp Is Turning Georgia Into Gilead,” by Anjali Enjeti in Dame Magazine, April 1, 2019 ● “Borderline,” by Anjali Enjeti, from Prime Number Magazine No. 79 ● Abortion Bans: 8 States Have Passed Bills to Limit the Procedure This Year● “Embryos Don’t Have Hearts,” by Katie Heaney● Invisible Sisters by Jessica Handler ● Dirty Dancingdir. Emile Ardolino (1987)● The Mothers by Brit Bennett● The Cider House Rulesby John Irving● Revolutionary Road by Richard Yates● “Hills Like White Elephants,” by Ernest Hemingway from Men Without Women● Hemingway’s “Hills Like White Elephants” from “The Girl’s” Point of View by Rachel Klein from McSweeney’s Internet Tendency, July 21, 2017● “Missouri could become first US state without an abortion clinic,” by Jessica Glenza, May 28, The Guardian.● “The Real Origins of the Religious Right” by Randall Balmer in Politico Magazine May 27, 2014 ● Gwendolyn Brooks, “the mother”● Pro, by Katha Pollitt● The Handmaid’s Tale, by Margaret Atwood● Our Bodies, Ourselves ● “An Abortion That Saved My Life,” by Susan Ito, in Refinery 29, January 22, 2015.● The BibleLearn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

69 MINMAY 30
Comments
Slouching Toward Gilead: Anjali Enjeti and Lacy Johnson on the new anti-abortion laws

Against Genre Snobbery: Marlon James and Daniel José Older on the Intersections of Literary and Genre Writing

In this episode of the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast, taped live at the inaugural Wordplay in Minneapolis, Minnesota, Marlon James and Daniel José Older speak with hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell about the politics of literary categories. They talk about Buffy the Vampire Slayer, the history of queerness in Africa, the importance of plot, the Wookieepedia, writing violence and respecting readers, and the details of dinosaurs. Guests:● Marlon James● Daniel José OlderReadings for the Episode: ● Black Leopard, Red Wolfby Marlon James● Dactyl Hill Squad & Dactyl Hill Squad: Freedom Fireby Daniel Jose Older● Hollywood Wivesby Jackie Collins● Buffy the Vampire Slayer● The Iliadby Homer● All the President’s Menby Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein● Madame Bovaryby Gustave Flaubert● Octavia Butler● The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ringby J.R.R. Tolkien● 100 Years of Solitudeby Gabriel Garcia Marquez● The Stand & It by Stephen King● Shogunby James Clavel...

60 MINMAY 16
Comments
Against Genre Snobbery: Marlon James and Daniel José Older on the Intersections of Literary and Genre Writing

Latest Episodes

An American Abroad: Deborah Landau and Mathangi Subramanian on Expat Writing

In this episode, poet Deborah Landau and novelist Mathangi Subramanian talk to Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast co-hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell about their writing lives as Americans abroad. From exploring Paris's rich expat literary history to witnessing the diversity of slums in India, Landau and Subramanian discuss what they found when they began writing in unfamiliar places. Guests:Deborah LandauMathangi SubramanianReadings for the Episode:Deborah LandauOrchideliriumThe Last Usable HourThe Uses of the BodySoft TargetsMathangi SubramanianA People’s History of HeavenThe Day My Outrage Went Viral, Zora Magazine, Aug. 2Picturing Change photography project (Greeshma Patel)Others:A Moveable Feast by Ernest HemingwayBehind the Beautiful Forevers by Katherine BooHow To Write About Africa by Binyavanga Wainaina, GrantaLearn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

70 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
An American Abroad: Deborah Landau and Mathangi Subramanian on Expat Writing

On Whiteness Part 2: Jess Row and Timothy Yu Talk Writing About Race

In the second half of a special two-part episode, novelist and critic Jess Row and poet and critic Tim Yu talk to Fiction/Non/Fiction co-hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell about writing about whiteness in America. Who gets to participate in cultural criticism, and why? Who gets reviewed by and compared to whom, and why? How can white writers render and challenge their communities’ part in the country’s history of racism? Row and Yu also share their responses to Bob Hicok’s recent essay about diversity in poetry. (Find Part I here.)Guests:Jess RowTim YuReadings for the Episode:Jess RowWhite FlightsYour Face in Mine“What Are White Writers For?” in The New Republic, Sept. 30, 2016“Native Sons: A straight white American man on loving James Baldwin and learning to write about race” in Guernica, Aug. 13, 2013“A Safe Space for Racism,” in The New Republic, Nov. 23, 2016Tim Yu"The Case of the 'Disappearing' Poet: Why did a white poet see the success of writers of color as a signal of his own demise?" The New Republic, August 7, 2019White Poets Want Chinese Culture Without Chinese People Calvin Trillin's "Have They Run Out of Provinces Yet?" is the latest in a long artistic tradition. The New Republic, April 8, 2016,100 Chinese SilencesWhitney TerrellThe King of Kings CountyOthers:White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism by Robin DiAngelo (book)"The Authentic Outsider: Bill Cheng, Anthony Marra, and the freedom to write what you don’t know," by V.V. Ganeshananthan“The Dominance of the White Male Critic,” by Elizabeth Méndez Berry and Chi-hui Yang, The New York Times, July 5, 2019"The Promise of American Poetry," by Bob Hicok, Utne Reader, Summer 2019 (originally appeared in Michigan Quarterly Review, Winter 2018)Race, Real Estate, and Uneven Development: The Kansas City Experience, 1900-2010 by Kevin Fox GothamPlaying in the Dark: Whiteness in the literary imagination by Toni MorrisonWhite People by Allan GurganusLiterary Color Lines: On Inclusion in Publishing Fiction/Non/Fiction #8: Dhonielle Clayton and Ayesha Pande Talk Sensitivity Reading January 11, 2018Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

58 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
On Whiteness Part 2: Jess Row and Timothy Yu Talk Writing About Race

On Whiteness Part I: Jess Row and Timothy Yu Talk Writing About Race

In the first half of a special two-part episode, novelist and critic Jess Row and poet and critic Tim Yu talk to Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast co-hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell about writing about whiteness in America. How can white writers render their communities’ part in the country’s history of racism, and also challenge them? Row and Yu also share their responses to Bob Hicok’s recent Utne Reader essay about diversity in poetry.To hear the full episode, subscribe to the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (make sure to include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below.Guests:Jess RowTim YuReadings for the Episode:Jess RowWhite FlightsYour Face in Mine“What Are White Writers For?” in The New Republic, Sept. 30, 2016“Native Sons: A straight white American man on loving James Baldwin and learning to write about race” in Guernica, Aug. 13, 2013T...

71 MIN3 weeks ago
Comments
On Whiteness Part I: Jess Row and Timothy Yu Talk Writing About Race

The Iranian Revolution at 40: Jasmin Darznik and Dina Nayeri On the Anniversary of the Republic

In this episode of the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast, Iranian-American novelists and memoirists Jasmin Darznik and Dina Nayeri talk to hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell about the 40th anniversary of the Iranian Revolution. How has the country changed in four decades, and what is it like to write about the preceding and subsequent history?Guests:Jasmin DarznikDina NayeriReadings for the Episode:Jasmin DarznikThe Good Daughter: A Memoir of My Mother’s Hidden LifeSong of a Captive Bird***Dina NayeriA Teaspoon of Earth and SeaRefugeThe Ungrateful Refugee: What Immigrants Never Tell YouThe ungrateful refugee: ‘We have no debt to repay’, April 4, 2017, The GuardianOthers: Forugh ForrokhzadLearn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

72 MINAUG 8
Comments
The Iranian Revolution at 40: Jasmin Darznik and Dina Nayeri On the Anniversary of the Republic

Space is the Place: Jonathan Fetter-Vorm and Mary Anne Mohanraj on the 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11's Moon Landing

In this episode of the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast, author and illustrator Jonathan Fetter-Vorm and science fiction writer Mary Anne Mohanraj talk to hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell about the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing and how space exploration has been rendered in images, nonfiction, and fiction. What has been erased from the history of space exploration, and what might the future hold? Guests:Jonathan Fetter-VormMary Anne MohanrajReadings for the Episode:By Jonathan Fetter-VormMoonbound: Apollo 11 and the Dream of SpaceflightTrinity: A Graphic History of the First Atomic BombBattle Lines: A Graphic History of the Civil War“To the Moon, but Not Back: You might be surprised what humans left behind on the lunar surface,” The New York Times, July 19, 2019By Mary Anne MohanrajLinks to Mary Anne Mohanraj’s Jump Spacestories, minus The Stars Change:The Stars ChangeOthers:Carrying the Fire by Michael CollinsHidden Figures by Margot ShetterlyThe Right Stuffby Tom WolfeApollo 13 (film)Apollo 13 by James Lovell and Jeffrey Kluger“To Make It to the Moon, Women Have to Escape Earth’s Gender Bias,” by Mary Robinette KowalMary Robinette Kowal on Twitter about peeing in space“Captain Marvel,” (film)“Star Wars (A New Hope)” (film)Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

68 MINJUL 25
Comments
Space is the Place: Jonathan Fetter-Vorm and Mary Anne Mohanraj on the 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11's Moon Landing

21: The Military in a Time of Trump: Elliot Ackerman and Anuradha Bhagwati on the Armed Services Past and Future

In this episode of the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast, novelist Elliot Ackerman and memoirist Anuradha Bhagwati talk about how the military has—and hasn’t—changed during Donald Trump’s time as Commander in Chief. They also discuss their own experiences as Marines, the history of the American military, and how its future may affect the country and the world.To hear the full episode, subscribe to the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (make sure to include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below.Guests:Elliot AckermanAnuradha BhagwatiReadings for the Episode:Waiting for Eden: a novel, by Elliot AckermanPlaces and Names: On War, Revolution, and Returning, by Elliot AckermanDark at the Crossing: A Novel, by Elliot AckermanGreen on Blue: A Novel, by Elliot AckermanUnbecoming: A Memoir of Disobedience, by Anuradha Bhagwati“What to Make of Military Endorsements,” by Elliot Ackerman, The New Yorker, Sept. 8, 2016“A Former Marine Looks Back on Her Life in a Male-Dominated Military,” by V. V. Ganeshananthan, The New York Times, April 21, 2019The Good Lieutenant, by Whitney Terrell“Donald Trump’s ‘Salute to America’ Was Not a Complete Authoritarian Nightmare,” by Joshua Keating, July 4, 2019, Slate.comFields of Fire by Jim WebbThe Things They Carriedby Tim O’BrienLearn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

70 MINJUL 11
Comments
21: The Military in a Time of Trump: Elliot Ackerman and Anuradha Bhagwati on the Armed Services Past and Future

A Court Supreme: Irin Carmon and Jay Wexler on Writing About SCOTUS and Justice in Fiction and Nonfiction

In this episode of the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast, New York Magazine senior correspondent Irin Carmon (co-author of Notorious RBG) and novelist and Boston University law professor Jay Wexler (author of Tuttle in the Balance) talk about news coverage and fictional depictions of the Supreme Court. How partisan is the Court becoming? Why use humor to write fiction about the nine Justices? Ruth Bader Ginsburg was Vladimir Nabokov’s student—what effect has this had on her writing, and how are she and other liberal justices contending with their Trump-appointed colleagues?Guests:● Irin Carmon● Jay Wexler Readings for the Episode:● Irin Carmon’s archive at New York Magazine ● “Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Clarence Thomas Are Officially at War Over Abortion,” The Cut, May 28, 2019, by Irin Carmon● “The big cases: Here are the U.S. Supreme Court’s most consequential cases in its current term, which runs from Oct. 2018 to June 2019.” By Han Huang, Lawrence Hurley and Andrew Chung, Reuters Graphics● Tuttle in the Balance, by Jay Wexler● The Adventures of Ed Tuttle, Associate Justice, and Other Stories, by Jay Wexler● Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburgby Irin Carmon, Shana Knizhnik● Supreme Courtship by Christopher Buckley● Our Non-Christian Nation: How Atheists, Satanists, Pagans, and Others Are Demanding Their Rightful Place in Public Lifeby Jay Wexler● Ari Richter, artist● “The Census Case Is Shaping Up to Be the Biggest Travesty Since Bush v. Gore,” by Richard L. Hasen, Slate, June 25, 2019Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

70 MINJUN 27
Comments
A Court Supreme: Irin Carmon and Jay Wexler on Writing About SCOTUS and Justice in Fiction and Nonfiction

Podcasting Pro Tips and Jonny Diamond on Creating LitHub Radio

In this episode of the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast, Whitney Terrell and V.V. Ganeshananthan share how they started the podcast, and offer podcasting tips with some help from friends who host their own shows. Then LitHub.com editor-in-chief Jonny Diamond speaks about the launch of LitHub Radio and his five-year anniversary as LitHub.com’s content czar, as well as his own writing. To hear the full episode, subscribe to the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast through iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, Spotify, or your favorite podcast app (make sure to include the forward slashes when searching). You can also listen by streaming from the player below. Guests:● Jonny Diamond● Tanzila “Taz” Ahmed, David Naimon, Zahir Janmohamed, and Connor Stratton (via AWP)Readings for the Episode:● The Power of Facebook: How Big is Too Big? Alexis C. Madrigal and Alexander Chee on the Darker Side Social Media, Fiction/Non/Fiction Episode 3, Season 1● What Facebook Did to American Democracy by Alexis C. Madr...

71 MINJUN 13
Comments
Podcasting Pro Tips and Jonny Diamond on Creating LitHub Radio

Slouching Toward Gilead: Anjali Enjeti and Lacy Johnson on the new anti-abortion laws

In this episode of the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast, Anjali Enjeti and Lacy Johnson speak with hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell about recent news and legislation about abortion, as well as its depiction in literature and film. Guests:● Lacy Johnson● Anjali Enjeti Readings for the Episode: ● “Is Masculinity a Terrorist Ideology? Lacy Johnson on Rachel Louise Snyder and the Ways We Name Violence,” on LitHub● The Reckonings by Lacy Johnson● “Governor Kemp Is Turning Georgia Into Gilead,” by Anjali Enjeti in Dame Magazine, April 1, 2019 ● “Borderline,” by Anjali Enjeti, from Prime Number Magazine No. 79 ● Abortion Bans: 8 States Have Passed Bills to Limit the Procedure This Year● “Embryos Don’t Have Hearts,” by Katie Heaney● Invisible Sisters by Jessica Handler ● Dirty Dancingdir. Emile Ardolino (1987)● The Mothers by Brit Bennett● The Cider House Rulesby John Irving● Revolutionary Road by Richard Yates● “Hills Like White Elephants,” by Ernest Hemingway from Men Without Women● Hemingway’s “Hills Like White Elephants” from “The Girl’s” Point of View by Rachel Klein from McSweeney’s Internet Tendency, July 21, 2017● “Missouri could become first US state without an abortion clinic,” by Jessica Glenza, May 28, The Guardian.● “The Real Origins of the Religious Right” by Randall Balmer in Politico Magazine May 27, 2014 ● Gwendolyn Brooks, “the mother”● Pro, by Katha Pollitt● The Handmaid’s Tale, by Margaret Atwood● Our Bodies, Ourselves ● “An Abortion That Saved My Life,” by Susan Ito, in Refinery 29, January 22, 2015.● The BibleLearn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

69 MINMAY 30
Comments
Slouching Toward Gilead: Anjali Enjeti and Lacy Johnson on the new anti-abortion laws

Against Genre Snobbery: Marlon James and Daniel José Older on the Intersections of Literary and Genre Writing

In this episode of the Fiction/Non/Fiction podcast, taped live at the inaugural Wordplay in Minneapolis, Minnesota, Marlon James and Daniel José Older speak with hosts V.V. Ganeshananthan and Whitney Terrell about the politics of literary categories. They talk about Buffy the Vampire Slayer, the history of queerness in Africa, the importance of plot, the Wookieepedia, writing violence and respecting readers, and the details of dinosaurs. Guests:● Marlon James● Daniel José OlderReadings for the Episode: ● Black Leopard, Red Wolfby Marlon James● Dactyl Hill Squad & Dactyl Hill Squad: Freedom Fireby Daniel Jose Older● Hollywood Wivesby Jackie Collins● Buffy the Vampire Slayer● The Iliadby Homer● All the President’s Menby Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein● Madame Bovaryby Gustave Flaubert● Octavia Butler● The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ringby J.R.R. Tolkien● 100 Years of Solitudeby Gabriel Garcia Marquez● The Stand & It by Stephen King● Shogunby James Clavel...

60 MINMAY 16
Comments
Against Genre Snobbery: Marlon James and Daniel José Older on the Intersections of Literary and Genre Writing

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