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Carnegie Council Audio Podcast

Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affai

10
Followers
20
Plays
Carnegie Council Audio Podcast
Carnegie Council Audio Podcast

Carnegie Council Audio Podcast

Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affai

10
Followers
20
Plays
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About Us

Listen to events at Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs. Speakers and interviewees include distinguished authors, government and UN officials, economists, policymakers, and businesspeople. Topics range from the ethics of war and peace, to the place of religion in politics, to issues at the forefront of global social justice. To learn more about our work and to explore a wealth of related resources, please visit our website at http://www.carnegiecouncil.org.

Latest Episodes

The Crack-Up: The 1919 Race Riots & the Crucible of Chicago, with Adam Green

During the "Red Summer" of 1919 dozens of race riots flared up across the U.S., but the anti-African American violence in Chicago stood out because of scale and social and political significance. University of Chicago's Professor Adam Green details the causes, the tragic events, and the aftermath in this riveting discussion. How did the riot affect the city's development for decades to come? How does it tie into questions about democracy and the end of World War I?

44 MIN1 days ago
Comments
The Crack-Up: The 1919 Race Riots & the Crucible of Chicago, with Adam Green

The Climate Reality Project & Environmental Activism, with Brian Mateo

Ahead of the Climate Strike rallies on September 20, Bard College's Brian Mateo discusses the Climate Reality Project, founded by Vice President Al Gore, and how it has informed his work regarding environmental activism and education. Why has Greta Thunberg's Climate Strike been so successful? How can protests turn into concrete policies?

22 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
The Climate Reality Project & Environmental Activism, with Brian Mateo

The Model International Mobility Convention, with Michael Doyle

In this timely talk, SIPA's Professor Michael Doyle details the Model International Mobility Convention, a "hypothetical ideal convention" developed to define a "comprehensive and coherent" set of regulations for the movement of people across borders. Why was it so important to account for tourists alongside refugees and migrant workers? How does this document represent a "realistic utopia"?

29 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
The Model International Mobility Convention, with Michael Doyle

The Chennai Water Crisis, Governance, & Media Narratives, with Kavitha Rajagopalan

Chennai, one of India's largest cities, is facing an ongoing water crisis due to drought and mismanagement. Senior Fellow Kavitha Rajagopalan explains how it got to this point and gives some important background on the city and the state of Tamil Nadu. Is climate change to blame? How does it connect to Indian politics and culture? And, beyond water trucks and desalination, how can Chennai solve this existential problem?

47 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
The Chennai Water Crisis, Governance, & Media Narratives, with Kavitha Rajagopalan

The 2020 Election & the View from Overseas, with Nikolas Gvosdev

As the 2020 election begins to come into focus, Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev details the foreign policy cleavages in the Democratic Party. Plus, referencing Nahal Toosi's recent article in "Politico," he discusses the worries that many in Europe have about a Trump reelection or a progressive candidate who also questions the status quo. What's the view from abroad on this turbulent time in American politics?

19 MIN3 weeks ago
Comments
The 2020 Election & the View from Overseas, with Nikolas Gvosdev

Ethics & the U.S.-China Trade War, with Nikolas Gvosdev

What role should ethics play in the U.S.-China trade war? Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev looks at these economic tensions in the context of the Uyghur detention and the Hong Kong protests, different theories on integrating China into the world economy, and what it could mean to "lose" in this conflict. Is there a breaking point in terms of China's human rights policies? What's the view in Africa and Europe?

25 MIN3 weeks ago
Comments
Ethics & the U.S.-China Trade War, with Nikolas Gvosdev

AI & Human Rights: The Practical & Philosophical Dimensions, with Mathias Risse

Mathias Risse, director of Harvard Kennedy School's Carr Center for Human Rights Policy, discusses the many connections between artificial intelligence and human rights. From practical applications in the criminal justice system to unanswered philosophical questions about the nature of consciousness, how should we talk about the ethics of this ever-changing technology?

35 MINAUG 8
Comments
AI & Human Rights: The Practical & Philosophical Dimensions, with Mathias Risse

Working Toward an "Open Knowledge" Future, with Catherine Stihler

Catherine Stihler, CEO of Open Knowledge Foundation, talks about how she is working toward an "open world where all non-personal information is free for everyone to use, build on, and share." As a former member of European Parliament, she also details the role that governments can play. What would a "fair, free, and open future" look like? What effect is today's divisive political atmosphere having on this goal?

24 MINJUL 31
Comments
Working Toward an "Open Knowledge" Future, with Catherine Stihler

A New Era of Cyberwarfare, with Arun Vishwanath

When the United States launched a massive cyberattack against Iran last month, it heralded "a new age of Internet warfare," says cybersecurity expert Arun Vishwanath. How could cyber-based conflicts change the nature of the Internet? Why is the U.S. especially vulnerable to these threats? And what would a "digital Geneva Convention" look like?

24 MINJUL 24
Comments
A New Era of Cyberwarfare, with Arun Vishwanath

International Migrants in China's Global City, with James Farrer

Is China becoming an immigrant society? Why do foreigners move to the country? What can we learn by studying Shanghai's international community? James Farrer, a professor at Tokyo's Sophia University, has interviewed over 400 migrants to China looking to answer these questions. He and Senior Fellow Devin Stewart discuss immigration's impact on Chinese culture and whether foreigners can ever really fit in.

32 MINJUL 10
Comments
International Migrants in China's Global City, with James Farrer

Latest Episodes

The Crack-Up: The 1919 Race Riots & the Crucible of Chicago, with Adam Green

During the "Red Summer" of 1919 dozens of race riots flared up across the U.S., but the anti-African American violence in Chicago stood out because of scale and social and political significance. University of Chicago's Professor Adam Green details the causes, the tragic events, and the aftermath in this riveting discussion. How did the riot affect the city's development for decades to come? How does it tie into questions about democracy and the end of World War I?

44 MIN1 days ago
Comments
The Crack-Up: The 1919 Race Riots & the Crucible of Chicago, with Adam Green

The Climate Reality Project & Environmental Activism, with Brian Mateo

Ahead of the Climate Strike rallies on September 20, Bard College's Brian Mateo discusses the Climate Reality Project, founded by Vice President Al Gore, and how it has informed his work regarding environmental activism and education. Why has Greta Thunberg's Climate Strike been so successful? How can protests turn into concrete policies?

22 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
The Climate Reality Project & Environmental Activism, with Brian Mateo

The Model International Mobility Convention, with Michael Doyle

In this timely talk, SIPA's Professor Michael Doyle details the Model International Mobility Convention, a "hypothetical ideal convention" developed to define a "comprehensive and coherent" set of regulations for the movement of people across borders. Why was it so important to account for tourists alongside refugees and migrant workers? How does this document represent a "realistic utopia"?

29 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
The Model International Mobility Convention, with Michael Doyle

The Chennai Water Crisis, Governance, & Media Narratives, with Kavitha Rajagopalan

Chennai, one of India's largest cities, is facing an ongoing water crisis due to drought and mismanagement. Senior Fellow Kavitha Rajagopalan explains how it got to this point and gives some important background on the city and the state of Tamil Nadu. Is climate change to blame? How does it connect to Indian politics and culture? And, beyond water trucks and desalination, how can Chennai solve this existential problem?

47 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
The Chennai Water Crisis, Governance, & Media Narratives, with Kavitha Rajagopalan

The 2020 Election & the View from Overseas, with Nikolas Gvosdev

As the 2020 election begins to come into focus, Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev details the foreign policy cleavages in the Democratic Party. Plus, referencing Nahal Toosi's recent article in "Politico," he discusses the worries that many in Europe have about a Trump reelection or a progressive candidate who also questions the status quo. What's the view from abroad on this turbulent time in American politics?

19 MIN3 weeks ago
Comments
The 2020 Election & the View from Overseas, with Nikolas Gvosdev

Ethics & the U.S.-China Trade War, with Nikolas Gvosdev

What role should ethics play in the U.S.-China trade war? Senior Fellow Nikolas Gvosdev looks at these economic tensions in the context of the Uyghur detention and the Hong Kong protests, different theories on integrating China into the world economy, and what it could mean to "lose" in this conflict. Is there a breaking point in terms of China's human rights policies? What's the view in Africa and Europe?

25 MIN3 weeks ago
Comments
Ethics & the U.S.-China Trade War, with Nikolas Gvosdev

AI & Human Rights: The Practical & Philosophical Dimensions, with Mathias Risse

Mathias Risse, director of Harvard Kennedy School's Carr Center for Human Rights Policy, discusses the many connections between artificial intelligence and human rights. From practical applications in the criminal justice system to unanswered philosophical questions about the nature of consciousness, how should we talk about the ethics of this ever-changing technology?

35 MINAUG 8
Comments
AI & Human Rights: The Practical & Philosophical Dimensions, with Mathias Risse

Working Toward an "Open Knowledge" Future, with Catherine Stihler

Catherine Stihler, CEO of Open Knowledge Foundation, talks about how she is working toward an "open world where all non-personal information is free for everyone to use, build on, and share." As a former member of European Parliament, she also details the role that governments can play. What would a "fair, free, and open future" look like? What effect is today's divisive political atmosphere having on this goal?

24 MINJUL 31
Comments
Working Toward an "Open Knowledge" Future, with Catherine Stihler

A New Era of Cyberwarfare, with Arun Vishwanath

When the United States launched a massive cyberattack against Iran last month, it heralded "a new age of Internet warfare," says cybersecurity expert Arun Vishwanath. How could cyber-based conflicts change the nature of the Internet? Why is the U.S. especially vulnerable to these threats? And what would a "digital Geneva Convention" look like?

24 MINJUL 24
Comments
A New Era of Cyberwarfare, with Arun Vishwanath

International Migrants in China's Global City, with James Farrer

Is China becoming an immigrant society? Why do foreigners move to the country? What can we learn by studying Shanghai's international community? James Farrer, a professor at Tokyo's Sophia University, has interviewed over 400 migrants to China looking to answer these questions. He and Senior Fellow Devin Stewart discuss immigration's impact on Chinese culture and whether foreigners can ever really fit in.

32 MINJUL 10
Comments
International Migrants in China's Global City, with James Farrer

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