title

Poverty Research & Policy

Institute for Research on Poverty

4
Followers
6
Plays
Poverty Research & Policy
Poverty Research & Policy

Poverty Research & Policy

Institute for Research on Poverty

4
Followers
6
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Details

About Us

The Poverty Research & Policy Podcast is produced by the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP) and features interviews with researchers about poverty, inequality, and policy in the United States.

Latest Episodes

Michael Strain: The American Dream Isn't Dead

This episode features Michael Strain, the Economic Policy Director at the American Enterprise Institute, who gave a talk at IRP earlier this year titled “The American Dream isn’t Dead.” It’s a provocative title and Strain says that this line of work is growing out of concerns he has about the narrative around the American Dream.

18 MINNOV 14
Comments
Michael Strain: The American Dream Isn't Dead

Leslie Hodges on Unemployment Insurance and Material Hardships

In this episode, we hear from IRP postdoctoral scholar Leslie Hodges about the Unemployment Insurance program and how the program might mitigate economic distress, including poverty and material hardships, when someone loses a job.

15 MINOCT 15
Comments
Leslie Hodges on Unemployment Insurance and Material Hardships

Brian Thiede on the Rural Economy and Barriers to Work in Rural America

There has been renewed interest in issues facing the U.S. rural economy in recent years. In this episode, Penn State sociologist and demographer Brian Thiede breaks down some of the key changes that have taken place in the rural labor market and discusses potential policy responses to barriers to work faced by rural Americans.

19 MINOCT 1
Comments
Brian Thiede on the Rural Economy and Barriers to Work in Rural America

Aaron Sojourner and Matt Wiswall on the Value of Investments in Quality Child Care

In this episode, we hear from economists Aaron Sojourner and Matt Wiswall about the value of investments in quality child care and how we can think about tradeoffs when it comes to child care subsidies and related policies.

19 MINAUG 6
Comments
Aaron Sojourner and Matt Wiswall on the Value of Investments in Quality Child Care

Damon Jones on Whether a Modest Basic Income Might Lead People to Work Less

The idea of a universal basic income has been gaining traction in recent years, but we don’t have much evidence about what a large-scale universal basic income policy would do. In this episode, University of Chicago economist Damon Jones talks about the idea of a universal basic income and discusses a study he did with Ioana Marinescu that looked at the Alaska Permanent Fund to better understand the labor market effects of universal and permanent cash payments.

22 MINJUL 19
Comments
Damon Jones on Whether a Modest Basic Income Might Lead People to Work Less

Marci Ybarra on the Administrative Burdens of Research in Non-Profit Settings

The concept of administrative burden focuses on how bureaucracy, complex paperwork, and confusing regulations can reduce the effectiveness of public programs and limit the rights of citizens. In this podcast episode, University of Chicago professor Marci Ybarra argues that research conducted in non-profit settings can introduce similar types of burdens by putting additional demands on those being served and on workers, and by changing the incentives for agencies themselves.

16 MINMAY 29
Comments
Marci Ybarra on the Administrative Burdens of Research in Non-Profit Settings

Walter Stern on Race and Education in New Orleans: Creating the Segregated City

In this episode, we hear from Walter Stern, an assistant professor in the History and Educational Policy Studies departments at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He discusses his recent book called Race and Education in New Orleans: Creating the Segregated City. His book, which focuses on the period from 1764-1960, looks at the role that schools played in the segregation of American cities with a particular focus on New Orleans.

27 MINAPR 27
Comments
Walter Stern on Race and Education in New Orleans: Creating the Segregated City

Maria Cancian and Dan Meyer on Final Results from the CSPED Impact Evaluation

In this episode,Maria Cancian and Daniel Meyer discuss the Child Support Noncustodial Parent Employment Demonstration or CSPED, a large, eight state experiment that aimed to see if a different approach to child support could lead to better outcomes. Over the course of the episode, they talk about how the CSPED project came to be, what it looked like for child support offices to change their approach to child support services for this demonstration, and what they learned. Cancian is the Dean of the McCourt School of Public Policy at Georgetown University and an affiliate and former director of the Institute for Research on Poverty. Meyer is Professor of Social Work at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and an IRP affiliate.

41 MINMAR 14
Comments
Maria Cancian and Dan Meyer on Final Results from the CSPED Impact Evaluation

Jordan Conwell on Parental Income, Race, Gender, and Children's School Readiness

In this podcast episode, sociologist Jordan Conwell of the University of Wisconsin-Madison talks about a study he did that aims to help us understand racial income inequality by looking for differences in how children of different races and genders, but the same family income, fare in early educational measures.

18 MINFEB 2
Comments
Jordan Conwell on Parental Income, Race, Gender, and Children's School Readiness

Lenna Nepomnyaschy on the Role of Fathers in Reducing Inequalities in Child Outcomes

In this podcast episode, Lenna Nepomnyaschy of the Rutgers School of Social Work talks about a study she did with Dan Miller, Maureen Waller, and Allison Dwyer Emory that looks at how father involvement matters for reducing socioeconomic inequalities in child outcomes.

14 MINJAN 16
Comments
Lenna Nepomnyaschy on the Role of Fathers in Reducing Inequalities in Child Outcomes

Latest Episodes

Michael Strain: The American Dream Isn't Dead

This episode features Michael Strain, the Economic Policy Director at the American Enterprise Institute, who gave a talk at IRP earlier this year titled “The American Dream isn’t Dead.” It’s a provocative title and Strain says that this line of work is growing out of concerns he has about the narrative around the American Dream.

18 MINNOV 14
Comments
Michael Strain: The American Dream Isn't Dead

Leslie Hodges on Unemployment Insurance and Material Hardships

In this episode, we hear from IRP postdoctoral scholar Leslie Hodges about the Unemployment Insurance program and how the program might mitigate economic distress, including poverty and material hardships, when someone loses a job.

15 MINOCT 15
Comments
Leslie Hodges on Unemployment Insurance and Material Hardships

Brian Thiede on the Rural Economy and Barriers to Work in Rural America

There has been renewed interest in issues facing the U.S. rural economy in recent years. In this episode, Penn State sociologist and demographer Brian Thiede breaks down some of the key changes that have taken place in the rural labor market and discusses potential policy responses to barriers to work faced by rural Americans.

19 MINOCT 1
Comments
Brian Thiede on the Rural Economy and Barriers to Work in Rural America

Aaron Sojourner and Matt Wiswall on the Value of Investments in Quality Child Care

In this episode, we hear from economists Aaron Sojourner and Matt Wiswall about the value of investments in quality child care and how we can think about tradeoffs when it comes to child care subsidies and related policies.

19 MINAUG 6
Comments
Aaron Sojourner and Matt Wiswall on the Value of Investments in Quality Child Care

Damon Jones on Whether a Modest Basic Income Might Lead People to Work Less

The idea of a universal basic income has been gaining traction in recent years, but we don’t have much evidence about what a large-scale universal basic income policy would do. In this episode, University of Chicago economist Damon Jones talks about the idea of a universal basic income and discusses a study he did with Ioana Marinescu that looked at the Alaska Permanent Fund to better understand the labor market effects of universal and permanent cash payments.

22 MINJUL 19
Comments
Damon Jones on Whether a Modest Basic Income Might Lead People to Work Less

Marci Ybarra on the Administrative Burdens of Research in Non-Profit Settings

The concept of administrative burden focuses on how bureaucracy, complex paperwork, and confusing regulations can reduce the effectiveness of public programs and limit the rights of citizens. In this podcast episode, University of Chicago professor Marci Ybarra argues that research conducted in non-profit settings can introduce similar types of burdens by putting additional demands on those being served and on workers, and by changing the incentives for agencies themselves.

16 MINMAY 29
Comments
Marci Ybarra on the Administrative Burdens of Research in Non-Profit Settings

Walter Stern on Race and Education in New Orleans: Creating the Segregated City

In this episode, we hear from Walter Stern, an assistant professor in the History and Educational Policy Studies departments at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He discusses his recent book called Race and Education in New Orleans: Creating the Segregated City. His book, which focuses on the period from 1764-1960, looks at the role that schools played in the segregation of American cities with a particular focus on New Orleans.

27 MINAPR 27
Comments
Walter Stern on Race and Education in New Orleans: Creating the Segregated City

Maria Cancian and Dan Meyer on Final Results from the CSPED Impact Evaluation

In this episode,Maria Cancian and Daniel Meyer discuss the Child Support Noncustodial Parent Employment Demonstration or CSPED, a large, eight state experiment that aimed to see if a different approach to child support could lead to better outcomes. Over the course of the episode, they talk about how the CSPED project came to be, what it looked like for child support offices to change their approach to child support services for this demonstration, and what they learned. Cancian is the Dean of the McCourt School of Public Policy at Georgetown University and an affiliate and former director of the Institute for Research on Poverty. Meyer is Professor of Social Work at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and an IRP affiliate.

41 MINMAR 14
Comments
Maria Cancian and Dan Meyer on Final Results from the CSPED Impact Evaluation

Jordan Conwell on Parental Income, Race, Gender, and Children's School Readiness

In this podcast episode, sociologist Jordan Conwell of the University of Wisconsin-Madison talks about a study he did that aims to help us understand racial income inequality by looking for differences in how children of different races and genders, but the same family income, fare in early educational measures.

18 MINFEB 2
Comments
Jordan Conwell on Parental Income, Race, Gender, and Children's School Readiness

Lenna Nepomnyaschy on the Role of Fathers in Reducing Inequalities in Child Outcomes

In this podcast episode, Lenna Nepomnyaschy of the Rutgers School of Social Work talks about a study she did with Dan Miller, Maureen Waller, and Allison Dwyer Emory that looks at how father involvement matters for reducing socioeconomic inequalities in child outcomes.

14 MINJAN 16
Comments
Lenna Nepomnyaschy on the Role of Fathers in Reducing Inequalities in Child Outcomes
hmly
himalayaプレミアムへようこそ聴き放題のオーディオブックをお楽しみください。