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The RunOut Podcast

The RunOut Podcast

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Followers
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The RunOut Podcast
The RunOut Podcast

The RunOut Podcast

The RunOut Podcast

2
Followers
2
Plays
0
Raised
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About Us

The RunOut Podcast The RunOut climbing podcast is a lateral discussion of the vertical world, with hosts Chris Kalous (host of The Enormocast podcast) and Andrew Bisharat (climbing journalist, Evening Sends, National Geographic) discussing current events and issues shaping the sport of climbing. Everything from mountaineering, bouldering, sport climbing, big-wall and your grandaddy's trad all covered. Our goal with this experiment in podcasting is to provide easily digestible doses of climbing conversation that we hope you'll find interesting, funny, informative, and makes you feel like you’re sitting around the campfire with us. Now pass the whiskey. ...

Latest Episodes

RunOut #22: Room to Reproduce with Eric Chabot of Hawkwatch International.

Spring is here and love is in the air. In the case of nesting closures at your local crag, we mean this quite literally. Across the country and the world, land managers tasked with protecting several species of cliff nesting raptors, find themselves baring climbing on routes and walls and whole areas so that sensitive birds can just have a little peace and quiet to get it on and raise their fledgling young. Despite crowing pretty nonstop about how much we love the outdoors and wild places, climbers can get pretty cranky pretty quickly when told we can’t do what we want, when we want, wherever we want. But in our defense, nesting closures can seem pretty scattershot from place to place, agency to agency, making us wonder, what exactly do these birds need to make the love connection. In light of a substantial increase in closures this spring in Indian Creek in Utah, AKA the climby chunk of the newly minted Bears Ears National Monument, we here at the RunOut decided to look for some answers to the how and why of nesting closures. We are joined on this episode by biologist/climber Eric Chabot of Hawkwatch International. Eric is intimately familiar with nesting closures in Indian Creek, around the Wasatch Range, and Western Desert, and can also shed some light on the science and resource pressures behind the nesting closures at your local area. I’m Chris Kalous, and joining us as usual is Andrew Bisharat, and you are listening to the RunOut. Oh, and if what you hear on today’s show doesn’t satisfy your cravings for the secret lives of randy birds, Eric can be reached at echabot@hawkwatch.org and is more than happy to field your appropriate questions. Hawkwatch International

33 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
RunOut #22: Room to Reproduce with Eric Chabot of Hawkwatch International.

RunOut #21: Jeff Smoot Relives Hangdog Days

In the 1980s, the rules of rock climbing were in a state of entropy. Climbers clashed over the fairest and most ethical approach to climbing and how to advance difficulty within these parameters. Depending on whom you spoke to, hangdogging was either a serious taboo—or the path to righteous radness. Of course, one trip to any sport crag anywhere on earth today will offer an obvious clue as to which side ultimately won. That hangdogging was once taboo now sounds as anachronistic as using a Rand McNally Atlas to navigate your car, while simultaneously fast forwarding your Phil Collins tape to get to the part of In the Air Tonight when the drum solo drops. But such was the 1980s. To push the ethical boundaries in the 1980s was to also accept the risk that you might just punched or taunted back at the campground. Yet when a climber achieved an inspiring ascent, by hook or crook, often times nothing more needed to be said. This is Andrew Bisharat, I’m here with Chris Kalous, and you’r...

35 MIN3 weeks ago
Comments
RunOut #21: Jeff Smoot Relives Hangdog Days

RunOut #20: Jim Reynolds’ Free Solo on Fitzroy Changes Everything/Nothing

If I told you a climber from California had free soloed three major formations in Patagonia—not only free soloing up them, but also free soloing down them, without using a rope to rappel—you’d be forgiven for thinking that I was talking about Alex Honnold. In fact, that climber was Jim Reynolds, a guy I had never really heard too much about before now. He’s a 25-year-old climber hailing from Weaverville, California. He works on the Yosemite Search and Rescue (YOSAR) team in the summer, wears rectangular frameless glasses, plays renditions of Slayer on a mandolin, and considers mental training to be wielding a wooden samurai katana in the sun-dappled light of a ponderosa forest behind the YOSAR campsite. Last month Jim made a big statement in Patagonia. He free soled up, and down, Fitz Roy, St. Exupery, and Rafael-Juarez. He did so without any fanfare, Insta-spray, or Oscar trophy waiting for him back home. Pretty bad ass. I got to speak to Jim shortly after his groundbreaking as...

33 MINAPR 13
Comments
RunOut #20: Jim Reynolds’ Free Solo on Fitzroy Changes Everything/Nothing

Latest Episodes

RunOut #22: Room to Reproduce with Eric Chabot of Hawkwatch International.

Spring is here and love is in the air. In the case of nesting closures at your local crag, we mean this quite literally. Across the country and the world, land managers tasked with protecting several species of cliff nesting raptors, find themselves baring climbing on routes and walls and whole areas so that sensitive birds can just have a little peace and quiet to get it on and raise their fledgling young. Despite crowing pretty nonstop about how much we love the outdoors and wild places, climbers can get pretty cranky pretty quickly when told we can’t do what we want, when we want, wherever we want. But in our defense, nesting closures can seem pretty scattershot from place to place, agency to agency, making us wonder, what exactly do these birds need to make the love connection. In light of a substantial increase in closures this spring in Indian Creek in Utah, AKA the climby chunk of the newly minted Bears Ears National Monument, we here at the RunOut decided to look for some answers to the how and why of nesting closures. We are joined on this episode by biologist/climber Eric Chabot of Hawkwatch International. Eric is intimately familiar with nesting closures in Indian Creek, around the Wasatch Range, and Western Desert, and can also shed some light on the science and resource pressures behind the nesting closures at your local area. I’m Chris Kalous, and joining us as usual is Andrew Bisharat, and you are listening to the RunOut. Oh, and if what you hear on today’s show doesn’t satisfy your cravings for the secret lives of randy birds, Eric can be reached at echabot@hawkwatch.org and is more than happy to field your appropriate questions. Hawkwatch International

33 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
RunOut #22: Room to Reproduce with Eric Chabot of Hawkwatch International.

RunOut #21: Jeff Smoot Relives Hangdog Days

In the 1980s, the rules of rock climbing were in a state of entropy. Climbers clashed over the fairest and most ethical approach to climbing and how to advance difficulty within these parameters. Depending on whom you spoke to, hangdogging was either a serious taboo—or the path to righteous radness. Of course, one trip to any sport crag anywhere on earth today will offer an obvious clue as to which side ultimately won. That hangdogging was once taboo now sounds as anachronistic as using a Rand McNally Atlas to navigate your car, while simultaneously fast forwarding your Phil Collins tape to get to the part of In the Air Tonight when the drum solo drops. But such was the 1980s. To push the ethical boundaries in the 1980s was to also accept the risk that you might just punched or taunted back at the campground. Yet when a climber achieved an inspiring ascent, by hook or crook, often times nothing more needed to be said. This is Andrew Bisharat, I’m here with Chris Kalous, and you’r...

35 MIN3 weeks ago
Comments
RunOut #21: Jeff Smoot Relives Hangdog Days

RunOut #20: Jim Reynolds’ Free Solo on Fitzroy Changes Everything/Nothing

If I told you a climber from California had free soloed three major formations in Patagonia—not only free soloing up them, but also free soloing down them, without using a rope to rappel—you’d be forgiven for thinking that I was talking about Alex Honnold. In fact, that climber was Jim Reynolds, a guy I had never really heard too much about before now. He’s a 25-year-old climber hailing from Weaverville, California. He works on the Yosemite Search and Rescue (YOSAR) team in the summer, wears rectangular frameless glasses, plays renditions of Slayer on a mandolin, and considers mental training to be wielding a wooden samurai katana in the sun-dappled light of a ponderosa forest behind the YOSAR campsite. Last month Jim made a big statement in Patagonia. He free soled up, and down, Fitz Roy, St. Exupery, and Rafael-Juarez. He did so without any fanfare, Insta-spray, or Oscar trophy waiting for him back home. Pretty bad ass. I got to speak to Jim shortly after his groundbreaking as...

33 MINAPR 13
Comments
RunOut #20: Jim Reynolds’ Free Solo on Fitzroy Changes Everything/Nothing
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