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Thundercling: A Super Awesome Rock Climbing Explosion Thunderpod

Dave McAllister

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Thundercling: A Super Awesome Rock Climbing Explosion Thunderpod
Thundercling: A Super Awesome Rock Climbing Explosion Thunderpod

Thundercling: A Super Awesome Rock Climbing Explosion Thunderpod

Dave McAllister

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About Us

Hosts Dave McAllister and Fidi Naj fall down the rock climbing rabbit hole, and they take down a bunch of folks with them. Interviews with professional climbers impacting the sport, industry insiders, gym rats (trainers/setters/coaches), road dawgs, photographers/writers/artists, and everyday ladies and gents that have chosen to make climbing a non-negotiable facet of their everyday lives. From low-ball bouldering to big wall slogging, the Thunderpod will introduce you to the folks keeping climbing weird, iconoclastic, and most importantly, entirely bad ass.

Latest Episodes

Episode 16: Chris Winter — Pulling Climbing Back From the Tipping Point

Chris Winter, the Executive Director for the Access Fund, has 99 problems but finding a solution ain't one. Chris, along with his tireless staff spread across the country, is forging a bold path forward for the Access Fund, tackling the issues attendant with climbing's massive explosion in popularity. Overcrowding, crag erosion, social trails, an often challenging federal political machine, human waste polka-dotting the crags, and the general ecological impact of millions of new climbers are just some of the issues gnawing at the iconoclastic, freewheeling ethos that climbing once held so dear to it's chest. As a million recent articles online and in the mags (most recent Climbing magazine issue) have highlighted, our dear sport is at a tipping point of sorts, a cliff edge none of us want to rappel from. Luckily, we have an army of capable advocates in the Access Fund (and hundreds of brilliant grassroots climbing organizations), fighting to maintain our land rights and at least a modicum of the freedom most of us uncoil our ropes in search of. Today, however, after Academy Awards, social media saturation, front page stories in The New York Times, and the gym-to-crag phenomenon, Chris and his team are dealing with issues that previous advocates fidgeted over hypothetically. Chris generously invited us to the Access Fund headquarters to chat about some of the issues unspooling at hyper-speed at nearly every short-approach crag in the country, especially locales hit hard like the Red River Gorge, Indian Creek, Red Rocks, Bishop, and countless others. Rather than hunting for a target to blame, however, Chris is focused on resolving the issues of overcrowding and Leave No Trace education, a daunting quandary. Together, Chris proffers, by supporting our local climbing orgs and the Access Fund -- and offering ourselves as stewards and examples at the crag -- the tipping point that climbing is rapidly approaching can mutate from a desperate collapse of crag integrity to a huge success story. We are the foot soldiers. And it's time to get to work. It's time to flip the script. Thank you, as always, to Ryne Doughty for the musical stylings. Have a question, concern, pitch, or criticism? Drop us a line at thunderclingpodcast@gmail.com. Toss us a DM on Instagram @thethundercling. We read and respond to every note we receive.

80 MIN4 days ago
Comments
Episode 16: Chris Winter — Pulling Climbing Back From the Tipping Point

Episode 15: Tony Yaniro — An American Pioneer

Tony Yaniro came of age as the Stonemasters were just solidifying their legendary status in the mid ’70s. In the shadows, however, climbers like Tony, Randy Leavitt, Max Jones and Mark Hudon, Ray Jardine, and a host of others were starting to shed the crotchety ethics of the day and pushing the sport in a new, gymnastic, era-defining direction. Tony and the gang hung on ropes to work out moves, bolted lines at a level previously unimagined, and developed a super-divisive style of sending. Today, we’d scoff at grumpy old coots slagging us for simply redpointing! Tony was the first person to climb at the .13b/c level, but redpointing and hangdogging weren’t the only arrows in his quiver. He developed his own training regimens on what he called “death machines,” homemade climbing holds affixed to walls, and route-specific workouts away from the crag. Today we beat ourselves into submission twice a week at the local gym. In the 1970s, it made Tony a revolutionary. He was one of the first and finest hold shapers on the planet. He’s a routesetter and trainer. He’s designed gyms and now owns his own facility in Prescott, Arizona. He’s stood at the vanguard of so many groundbreaking moments in climbing history that it’s hard to fathom how he isn’t the most pompous asshole in the industry. But he’s not. He’s humble and kind and hell-bent on sharing his knowledge with the wider climbing world. Fidi and I had the rare honor to sit down with Tony and rue the fact we could only steal an hour of his time. We could have listened for days… Thanks also to Dennis Taylor, one of Tony’s employees, for jumping into the shark tank and joining us on the podcast at the last minute. Have a question, comment, concern? Wanna write for Thundercling or have a great guest idea? Get ahold of us at thunderclingpodcast@gmail.com or on Instagram @thethundercling. We respond to every missive we get. Finally, thanks to the old stalwart Ryne Doughty for the reliably rad tunes.

79 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
Episode 15: Tony Yaniro — An American Pioneer

Episode 14: Brendan Leonard — “If you’re gonna suffer, get in there…”

Brendan Leonard has this incredible knack for making you feel like you could do just about anything you set your mind to, while simultaneously filling you with existential dread that you'll never realize your full potential. How can that be? Because fulfilling potential, doing incredible things, all of it -- it's hard as shit. And he's the most distilled reflection of gritty, gumption-seeping grinding I can conjure. Brendan's made a career out of setting his jaw and getting down to the work, week after week, year after year. In 2011, struggling to build a steady adventure writing career, he launched Semi-Rad.com, a celebration of outdoor life -- by, for, and about the average athlete and adventurer. All these years later, never missing a week without at least one entirely free and generally great essay, Semi-Rad retains a loyal fanbase. Brendan leveraged this success into a number of writing gigs, from Contributing Editor at Climbing Magazine to his first memoir to award winning filmmaker. He's currently a Contributing Editor at the Adventure Journal and columnist for Outside Magazine. He's written eight books with a ninth on the way. He's only 40-years-old, for god's sake... After witnessing and aiding in a rescue on Castleton Tower, Brendan took a break from climbing and decided, you know, to start ultrarunning. As one does. His most recent film, "How To Run 100 Miles," solidified his directorial chops with millions of views on YouTube and a Staff Pick selection on Vimeo. Just so you understand: He's writing full-time (books, essays, articles), directing short films, regularly logging 26-mile days, teaching writing workshops, and probably a dozen other things he's secretly fomenting in the raging creative torrent that serves as his brain. Sit down, pour a cup of coffee, and enjoy listening to one of the finest storytellers working today. And keep a pen and paper handy. Not only does Brendan offer some insight into making one's way as a creative in the outdoor industry, but he also drops a couple bushels of movie, podcast, book, and music recommendations along the way. Want to write for Thundercling? Have a recommendation, comment, or criticism? Shoot us an email at thunderclingpodcast@gmail.com. We read and respond to every email. AND REMEMBER THE TEE SHIRT CONTEST! As always, thanks to Ryne Doughty for the sound nuggets in our brain parts!

132 MINMAY 15
Comments
Episode 14: Brendan Leonard — “If you’re gonna suffer, get in there…”

Latest Episodes

Episode 16: Chris Winter — Pulling Climbing Back From the Tipping Point

Chris Winter, the Executive Director for the Access Fund, has 99 problems but finding a solution ain't one. Chris, along with his tireless staff spread across the country, is forging a bold path forward for the Access Fund, tackling the issues attendant with climbing's massive explosion in popularity. Overcrowding, crag erosion, social trails, an often challenging federal political machine, human waste polka-dotting the crags, and the general ecological impact of millions of new climbers are just some of the issues gnawing at the iconoclastic, freewheeling ethos that climbing once held so dear to it's chest. As a million recent articles online and in the mags (most recent Climbing magazine issue) have highlighted, our dear sport is at a tipping point of sorts, a cliff edge none of us want to rappel from. Luckily, we have an army of capable advocates in the Access Fund (and hundreds of brilliant grassroots climbing organizations), fighting to maintain our land rights and at least a modicum of the freedom most of us uncoil our ropes in search of. Today, however, after Academy Awards, social media saturation, front page stories in The New York Times, and the gym-to-crag phenomenon, Chris and his team are dealing with issues that previous advocates fidgeted over hypothetically. Chris generously invited us to the Access Fund headquarters to chat about some of the issues unspooling at hyper-speed at nearly every short-approach crag in the country, especially locales hit hard like the Red River Gorge, Indian Creek, Red Rocks, Bishop, and countless others. Rather than hunting for a target to blame, however, Chris is focused on resolving the issues of overcrowding and Leave No Trace education, a daunting quandary. Together, Chris proffers, by supporting our local climbing orgs and the Access Fund -- and offering ourselves as stewards and examples at the crag -- the tipping point that climbing is rapidly approaching can mutate from a desperate collapse of crag integrity to a huge success story. We are the foot soldiers. And it's time to get to work. It's time to flip the script. Thank you, as always, to Ryne Doughty for the musical stylings. Have a question, concern, pitch, or criticism? Drop us a line at thunderclingpodcast@gmail.com. Toss us a DM on Instagram @thethundercling. We read and respond to every note we receive.

80 MIN4 days ago
Comments
Episode 16: Chris Winter — Pulling Climbing Back From the Tipping Point

Episode 15: Tony Yaniro — An American Pioneer

Tony Yaniro came of age as the Stonemasters were just solidifying their legendary status in the mid ’70s. In the shadows, however, climbers like Tony, Randy Leavitt, Max Jones and Mark Hudon, Ray Jardine, and a host of others were starting to shed the crotchety ethics of the day and pushing the sport in a new, gymnastic, era-defining direction. Tony and the gang hung on ropes to work out moves, bolted lines at a level previously unimagined, and developed a super-divisive style of sending. Today, we’d scoff at grumpy old coots slagging us for simply redpointing! Tony was the first person to climb at the .13b/c level, but redpointing and hangdogging weren’t the only arrows in his quiver. He developed his own training regimens on what he called “death machines,” homemade climbing holds affixed to walls, and route-specific workouts away from the crag. Today we beat ourselves into submission twice a week at the local gym. In the 1970s, it made Tony a revolutionary. He was one of the first and finest hold shapers on the planet. He’s a routesetter and trainer. He’s designed gyms and now owns his own facility in Prescott, Arizona. He’s stood at the vanguard of so many groundbreaking moments in climbing history that it’s hard to fathom how he isn’t the most pompous asshole in the industry. But he’s not. He’s humble and kind and hell-bent on sharing his knowledge with the wider climbing world. Fidi and I had the rare honor to sit down with Tony and rue the fact we could only steal an hour of his time. We could have listened for days… Thanks also to Dennis Taylor, one of Tony’s employees, for jumping into the shark tank and joining us on the podcast at the last minute. Have a question, comment, concern? Wanna write for Thundercling or have a great guest idea? Get ahold of us at thunderclingpodcast@gmail.com or on Instagram @thethundercling. We respond to every missive we get. Finally, thanks to the old stalwart Ryne Doughty for the reliably rad tunes.

79 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
Episode 15: Tony Yaniro — An American Pioneer

Episode 14: Brendan Leonard — “If you’re gonna suffer, get in there…”

Brendan Leonard has this incredible knack for making you feel like you could do just about anything you set your mind to, while simultaneously filling you with existential dread that you'll never realize your full potential. How can that be? Because fulfilling potential, doing incredible things, all of it -- it's hard as shit. And he's the most distilled reflection of gritty, gumption-seeping grinding I can conjure. Brendan's made a career out of setting his jaw and getting down to the work, week after week, year after year. In 2011, struggling to build a steady adventure writing career, he launched Semi-Rad.com, a celebration of outdoor life -- by, for, and about the average athlete and adventurer. All these years later, never missing a week without at least one entirely free and generally great essay, Semi-Rad retains a loyal fanbase. Brendan leveraged this success into a number of writing gigs, from Contributing Editor at Climbing Magazine to his first memoir to award winning filmmaker. He's currently a Contributing Editor at the Adventure Journal and columnist for Outside Magazine. He's written eight books with a ninth on the way. He's only 40-years-old, for god's sake... After witnessing and aiding in a rescue on Castleton Tower, Brendan took a break from climbing and decided, you know, to start ultrarunning. As one does. His most recent film, "How To Run 100 Miles," solidified his directorial chops with millions of views on YouTube and a Staff Pick selection on Vimeo. Just so you understand: He's writing full-time (books, essays, articles), directing short films, regularly logging 26-mile days, teaching writing workshops, and probably a dozen other things he's secretly fomenting in the raging creative torrent that serves as his brain. Sit down, pour a cup of coffee, and enjoy listening to one of the finest storytellers working today. And keep a pen and paper handy. Not only does Brendan offer some insight into making one's way as a creative in the outdoor industry, but he also drops a couple bushels of movie, podcast, book, and music recommendations along the way. Want to write for Thundercling? Have a recommendation, comment, or criticism? Shoot us an email at thunderclingpodcast@gmail.com. We read and respond to every email. AND REMEMBER THE TEE SHIRT CONTEST! As always, thanks to Ryne Doughty for the sound nuggets in our brain parts!

132 MINMAY 15
Comments
Episode 14: Brendan Leonard — “If you’re gonna suffer, get in there…”

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