title

Acting Is... » Notes on Acting

Eric Barr

2
Followers
10
Plays
Acting Is... » Notes on Acting
Acting Is... » Notes on Acting

Acting Is... » Notes on Acting

Eric Barr

2
Followers
10
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Details

About Us

The Actor's Online ResourceWeekly practical and motivational podcasts of importance to actors. Supplement your acting classes, private study, or your reading with clear and concise talks about acting techniques and approaches that will make your work more interesting for you, your acting partners, and audiences. Subscribe here or via iTunes.

Latest Episodes

improv classes

Students in my acting classes know that when they do scene work the expectation is that they will rehearse and plan their work carefully to demonstrate that they can make and repeat good choices and give the impression that it is all happening for the first time. I don’t want students improvising their scene work in front of us tdespite that I thinkthat improvisation classes and workshops are good training for actors andvisation I don’t necessarily mean comic improvisation. . If you believe as I do that acting is reacting—improvisation teaches you to listen and watch carefully so you respond and react to what your acting partners are giving . Improvisation sharpens your mind and body. And teaches the most important lesson , which is to say yes to whatever other actors give you. saying yes to what you are given is a great life lesson as well as a great acting lesson– as so many actinglessons are—in life you must deal with where you are andwhat you are given. Pretending life is d...

-1 s2014 MAR 17
Comments
improv classes

TRUST YOURSELF

http://www.actingis.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/Trust_Yourself.mp3I am delighted that you have chosen to listen tomy NOTES ON ACTING podcasts ng but I hope you understand that my goal in providing these thoughtss isto help you learn your craft so you can listen to and trust your own acting instincts. to have a career as an actor you must be ablle to work on your own and be able to handle any kind of acting challenge. It is particularly true that you must be self-reliant when working in television where there might be many different voices giving directions and in theatre with a weak director who has little to offer you, you must still create strong ,believable three dimensional characters. That is your job regardless of the situation you find yourself in. To do this you must develop your acting instincts and trust yourself. The difficulty is this trust comes from working. The more you work the stronger your acting instincts get. Its like that old conundrum to get an agent you mus...

1 s2014 JAN 29
Comments
TRUST YOURSELF

Stop Thinking and Nail That Audition: Wisdom from “The Dude”

If you have listened to my podcasts you know that I think you should be able to read a script carefully and pull out story and character clues to guide your work. You don’t have to be a scholar but you must be analytical and disciplined so you can find a doorway for yourself into the script. If a choice you make feels wrong don’t worry about it, for as jazz musician Miles Davis said, “Don’t worry about mistakes there aren’t any.” If something that feels wrong or uncomfortable see it as an opportunity to explore and find something new, at the audition. Don’t try to think your way into a character. Find the element that allows you to embody the person, some movement, posture or gesture that allows you to slip inside the character without having to think through every line reading or choice–sometimes over- thinking things only serves to paralyze you as you try to pick the right answer out of a bouquet of choices. Even if you knew everything the producer was thinking it wouldn’...

1 s2013 DEC 21
Comments
Stop Thinking and Nail That Audition: Wisdom from “The Dude”

Stay Strong

If you listen to my Notes on Acting regularly you know that I haven’t added a new podcast in several months. What you don’t know is that in April I developed an infection in my heart that caused several strokes. I was in a fight for my life and the strokes made it impossible for me to speak and paralyzed my left side. I am now well enough to write and produce a podcast and get it on the website and I am more than anxious to talk to actors and those who visited the website in the past 6 months I have been forced to learn some important life lessons that I think apply to acting. First no matter how long it takes for your career to take off don’t give up. Re-learning to talk and walk again have been the hardest things I have ever done and my success depends on me showing up at rehab every day mentally and physically and persevering and working regardless of how tired or frustrated I am. I cannot give up on myself, that’s a lesson I learned as an actor, and you can’t give up on you...

1 s2013 OCT 12
Comments
Stay Strong

Acting Classes with Guest Victor Chi

Victor Chi, this week’s Notes on Acting guest, is an actor based in Los Angeles, California. In this podcast, Victor shares his thoughts on taking acting classes once you arrive in Los Angeles or New York. He looks at the different types of classes, explains why you should take them, and how to find the best ones for you. Victor works in theatre, film, and television and recently did a show with the Young Vic in London, which also played at A.R.T. at Harvard. Listen to full podcast. For podcasts and more follow on Twitter @NotesOnActing. Listen to podcasts on iTunes or Stitcher On Demand Radio Links: Victor Chi IMDB Victor Chi website

4 MIN2013 APR 28
Comments
Acting Classes with Guest Victor Chi

Character is Behavior

You can create a character by building it from the ‘outside in’ by finding your walk, posture, and rhythms. Or you can build it from the ‘inside out’ by determining how the character thinks and responds to people, places, and things. Or you can figure out what your character wants and carefully determine how he or she goes about getting it. By knowing your character’s objectives, actions, and adjustments you will end up defining your character. Remember, the objective is what the character needs. The actions are what the character does to get what he wants. And the adjustments are how the character does the things he does to get what he wants. And it is in the “how” that characterization resides. Clearly, the distinction between two characters that have similar objectives and actions is in how they approach their actions. So thinking about characterization in this way should help you to play any character. As you get ready to take on a new role, think carefully about how your...

5 MIN2013 APR 22
Comments
Character is Behavior

More on Actor’s Research

To get inside a script, you need to read, brainstorm, research, and visualize. But sometimes you need more. Since professions define who we are, you need to understand your character’s profession and learn as much about it as you can. The best way to do that is to watch people doing that job and interview them about their work and careers. People love talking to actors; so don’t hesitate to talk to people about their work and how they do it. Show them your script and ask if they have any suggestions for activities or behavior for you While you might not be able to duplicate every experience your character has, try to experience as many as you can so you can do them honestly. If you can’t experience them because they are dangerous or illegal go back to Google and YouTube and watch interviews and clips of people doing those things. With a little effort, you can find almost anything you are looking for online. So read the script carefully, brainstorm, do your research, and use your ...

6 MIN2013 APR 15
Comments
More on Actor’s Research

Acting in the Age of Google

Before the internet existed, actors actually had to go to the library to do research. They had to stand in line for the reference librarian and wait to make copies of articles and essays. As valuable as it was, just getting access to information put a lot of actors off the important task of doing their creative research. But that has all changed. With Google, other search engines and online information sites, actors can now do most of their research from home or from a coffee shop. Despite that many actors still don’t do research because they don’t recognize its value or don’t know how to do it. In this first podcast on acting in the age of Google, you’ll be introduced to some easy guidelines on how to do creative research that will help your next performance soar. We’ll look at making notes, searching for clues, and using your imagination. Great scripts and great acting demand that you get inside the world of a script and live there comfortably–and the only way to do that is ...

7 MIN2013 APR 7
Comments
Acting in the Age of Google

The Unbroken Line

Music is composed of notes and rests and has a clear beginning, middle, and end. During the rests there is no sound but the piece doesn’t stop. The music unspools a beat at a time and the silences compliment the sounds and make them all the more effective by creating rhythmic shifts and contrasts. Speech is composed of sounds and silences and the silences are required to make the words understandable. There is an unbroken line that holds an idea together and the silences don’t end the idea, in fact they make it comprehensible. When you perform in a play or movie you speak and you pause, you enter and exit. The material has a clear beginning, middle, and end and none of your silences or exits should stop the flow of the story or the life of your character. It is your job to insure that throughout the performance, both unspool like continuous threads even when your character is not speaking or not in a scene. This way, as Stanislavski says, your character “flows from the past, thro...

5 MIN2013 MAR 31
Comments
The Unbroken Line

You Can’t Become Someone Else

Watching Daniel Day-Lewis play Abraham Lincoln, audiences felt like they were seeing the real man. They felt that the actor had somehow turned the monument into flesh and blood. But the truth is that we don’t really know what Lincoln was like. There are many books that describe him, his relationships, and his presidency but we still don’t know the man. So what did Day-Lewis do? He captured the spirit of Lincoln and his sensitivities. He played the actions that Lincoln might have used in the situations presented and pursued his goals through many means. He played the inner life of a man, a husband, a father, a president, and a politician. And he created a physicality and voice that seemed to evoke the man. The acting lesson to take from Daniel Day-Lewis’ performanceis not how to become an exact replica of a person but rather how to combine research with imagination, analysis, and intuition to create an honest, living character who is appropriate for the story. Remember,you can nev...

6 MIN2013 MAR 25
Comments
You Can’t Become Someone Else
the END

Latest Episodes

improv classes

Students in my acting classes know that when they do scene work the expectation is that they will rehearse and plan their work carefully to demonstrate that they can make and repeat good choices and give the impression that it is all happening for the first time. I don’t want students improvising their scene work in front of us tdespite that I thinkthat improvisation classes and workshops are good training for actors andvisation I don’t necessarily mean comic improvisation. . If you believe as I do that acting is reacting—improvisation teaches you to listen and watch carefully so you respond and react to what your acting partners are giving . Improvisation sharpens your mind and body. And teaches the most important lesson , which is to say yes to whatever other actors give you. saying yes to what you are given is a great life lesson as well as a great acting lesson– as so many actinglessons are—in life you must deal with where you are andwhat you are given. Pretending life is d...

-1 s2014 MAR 17
Comments
improv classes

TRUST YOURSELF

http://www.actingis.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/Trust_Yourself.mp3I am delighted that you have chosen to listen tomy NOTES ON ACTING podcasts ng but I hope you understand that my goal in providing these thoughtss isto help you learn your craft so you can listen to and trust your own acting instincts. to have a career as an actor you must be ablle to work on your own and be able to handle any kind of acting challenge. It is particularly true that you must be self-reliant when working in television where there might be many different voices giving directions and in theatre with a weak director who has little to offer you, you must still create strong ,believable three dimensional characters. That is your job regardless of the situation you find yourself in. To do this you must develop your acting instincts and trust yourself. The difficulty is this trust comes from working. The more you work the stronger your acting instincts get. Its like that old conundrum to get an agent you mus...

1 s2014 JAN 29
Comments
TRUST YOURSELF

Stop Thinking and Nail That Audition: Wisdom from “The Dude”

If you have listened to my podcasts you know that I think you should be able to read a script carefully and pull out story and character clues to guide your work. You don’t have to be a scholar but you must be analytical and disciplined so you can find a doorway for yourself into the script. If a choice you make feels wrong don’t worry about it, for as jazz musician Miles Davis said, “Don’t worry about mistakes there aren’t any.” If something that feels wrong or uncomfortable see it as an opportunity to explore and find something new, at the audition. Don’t try to think your way into a character. Find the element that allows you to embody the person, some movement, posture or gesture that allows you to slip inside the character without having to think through every line reading or choice–sometimes over- thinking things only serves to paralyze you as you try to pick the right answer out of a bouquet of choices. Even if you knew everything the producer was thinking it wouldn’...

1 s2013 DEC 21
Comments
Stop Thinking and Nail That Audition: Wisdom from “The Dude”

Stay Strong

If you listen to my Notes on Acting regularly you know that I haven’t added a new podcast in several months. What you don’t know is that in April I developed an infection in my heart that caused several strokes. I was in a fight for my life and the strokes made it impossible for me to speak and paralyzed my left side. I am now well enough to write and produce a podcast and get it on the website and I am more than anxious to talk to actors and those who visited the website in the past 6 months I have been forced to learn some important life lessons that I think apply to acting. First no matter how long it takes for your career to take off don’t give up. Re-learning to talk and walk again have been the hardest things I have ever done and my success depends on me showing up at rehab every day mentally and physically and persevering and working regardless of how tired or frustrated I am. I cannot give up on myself, that’s a lesson I learned as an actor, and you can’t give up on you...

1 s2013 OCT 12
Comments
Stay Strong

Acting Classes with Guest Victor Chi

Victor Chi, this week’s Notes on Acting guest, is an actor based in Los Angeles, California. In this podcast, Victor shares his thoughts on taking acting classes once you arrive in Los Angeles or New York. He looks at the different types of classes, explains why you should take them, and how to find the best ones for you. Victor works in theatre, film, and television and recently did a show with the Young Vic in London, which also played at A.R.T. at Harvard. Listen to full podcast. For podcasts and more follow on Twitter @NotesOnActing. Listen to podcasts on iTunes or Stitcher On Demand Radio Links: Victor Chi IMDB Victor Chi website

4 MIN2013 APR 28
Comments
Acting Classes with Guest Victor Chi

Character is Behavior

You can create a character by building it from the ‘outside in’ by finding your walk, posture, and rhythms. Or you can build it from the ‘inside out’ by determining how the character thinks and responds to people, places, and things. Or you can figure out what your character wants and carefully determine how he or she goes about getting it. By knowing your character’s objectives, actions, and adjustments you will end up defining your character. Remember, the objective is what the character needs. The actions are what the character does to get what he wants. And the adjustments are how the character does the things he does to get what he wants. And it is in the “how” that characterization resides. Clearly, the distinction between two characters that have similar objectives and actions is in how they approach their actions. So thinking about characterization in this way should help you to play any character. As you get ready to take on a new role, think carefully about how your...

5 MIN2013 APR 22
Comments
Character is Behavior

More on Actor’s Research

To get inside a script, you need to read, brainstorm, research, and visualize. But sometimes you need more. Since professions define who we are, you need to understand your character’s profession and learn as much about it as you can. The best way to do that is to watch people doing that job and interview them about their work and careers. People love talking to actors; so don’t hesitate to talk to people about their work and how they do it. Show them your script and ask if they have any suggestions for activities or behavior for you While you might not be able to duplicate every experience your character has, try to experience as many as you can so you can do them honestly. If you can’t experience them because they are dangerous or illegal go back to Google and YouTube and watch interviews and clips of people doing those things. With a little effort, you can find almost anything you are looking for online. So read the script carefully, brainstorm, do your research, and use your ...

6 MIN2013 APR 15
Comments
More on Actor’s Research

Acting in the Age of Google

Before the internet existed, actors actually had to go to the library to do research. They had to stand in line for the reference librarian and wait to make copies of articles and essays. As valuable as it was, just getting access to information put a lot of actors off the important task of doing their creative research. But that has all changed. With Google, other search engines and online information sites, actors can now do most of their research from home or from a coffee shop. Despite that many actors still don’t do research because they don’t recognize its value or don’t know how to do it. In this first podcast on acting in the age of Google, you’ll be introduced to some easy guidelines on how to do creative research that will help your next performance soar. We’ll look at making notes, searching for clues, and using your imagination. Great scripts and great acting demand that you get inside the world of a script and live there comfortably–and the only way to do that is ...

7 MIN2013 APR 7
Comments
Acting in the Age of Google

The Unbroken Line

Music is composed of notes and rests and has a clear beginning, middle, and end. During the rests there is no sound but the piece doesn’t stop. The music unspools a beat at a time and the silences compliment the sounds and make them all the more effective by creating rhythmic shifts and contrasts. Speech is composed of sounds and silences and the silences are required to make the words understandable. There is an unbroken line that holds an idea together and the silences don’t end the idea, in fact they make it comprehensible. When you perform in a play or movie you speak and you pause, you enter and exit. The material has a clear beginning, middle, and end and none of your silences or exits should stop the flow of the story or the life of your character. It is your job to insure that throughout the performance, both unspool like continuous threads even when your character is not speaking or not in a scene. This way, as Stanislavski says, your character “flows from the past, thro...

5 MIN2013 MAR 31
Comments
The Unbroken Line

You Can’t Become Someone Else

Watching Daniel Day-Lewis play Abraham Lincoln, audiences felt like they were seeing the real man. They felt that the actor had somehow turned the monument into flesh and blood. But the truth is that we don’t really know what Lincoln was like. There are many books that describe him, his relationships, and his presidency but we still don’t know the man. So what did Day-Lewis do? He captured the spirit of Lincoln and his sensitivities. He played the actions that Lincoln might have used in the situations presented and pursued his goals through many means. He played the inner life of a man, a husband, a father, a president, and a politician. And he created a physicality and voice that seemed to evoke the man. The acting lesson to take from Daniel Day-Lewis’ performanceis not how to become an exact replica of a person but rather how to combine research with imagination, analysis, and intuition to create an honest, living character who is appropriate for the story. Remember,you can nev...

6 MIN2013 MAR 25
Comments
You Can’t Become Someone Else
the END
hmly
himalayaプレミアムへようこそ聴き放題のオーディオブックをお楽しみください。