title

Homesteady - Stories of homesteading farming hunting and fishing

Austin Martin, Squash Hollow Farm

42
Followers
42
Plays
Homesteady - Stories of homesteading farming hunting and fishing
Homesteady - Stories of homesteading farming hunting and fishing

Homesteady - Stories of homesteading farming hunting and fishing

Austin Martin, Squash Hollow Farm

42
Followers
42
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

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About Us

Have you ever dreamt of starting a farm or homesteading? Do you love foraging for wild edibles? Is your perfect afternoon spent drifting downriver, fishing for that nights dinner? Or do love to spend a crisp fall morning hunting for wild game to share with your family? Or perhaps you spend all your free time digging in your garden, collecting herbs, vegetables, and fruits to enjoy. Homesteady is a show that focuses on living a more sustainable life. We talk about all the ways a modern Homsteader can put food on the table, from the fields, streams, gardens and woodlands. Our roads may be rocky, but with the right skills and knowledge we can make Homesteady.

Latest Episodes

Your First Cow - Basics, Safety and Where to Start

Karin grew up on a mixed family farm in Alberta, Canada, raising and selling backgrounding stocker steers. Her main passion since she was little was with the cattle, from handling to pasture management. She currently works as a forage-beef extension specialist with the provincial government and is working towards getting into farming of her own some day. She shares thoughts, and advice on all things cattle at her website https://www.bovinepracticum.com/ Karin is coming on the show to talk about working with Cattle. She will help us cover safety, how to make their life as comfortable as possible,and share some tips and tricks to working with cattle.

33 MIN3 weeks ago
Comments
Your First Cow - Basics, Safety and Where to Start

17 Year Old's Secret - How She Built a Successful Family Farm Business With GOATS!

In this episode of the Podcast, we interview Rachyl Travis, of Travis Family Farm. At 9 years old, milking her first goat, Rachyl had no idea that someday she would be running a successful family farm business. A pet goat given to her at 9 years old soon turned into multiple goats, and when Rachyl wound up with 15 goats in milk, and 15 gallons of milk a day to process, she had to figure out something to do with all of the milk. Rachyl didn’t want the milk to go to waste. She enlisted the help of her older sister and together they came up with the first goat milk product: the famous goat milk soap. In June 2012, Rachyl’s Goat Milk Soap was born after family and friends raved about the soap they received as gifts and asked to buy it! Now Rachyl sells her product in many stores and farmers markets through out Rhode Island with her mom and sister at her side! Rachyl shares her story, and the secret to overcoming fear when starting your own farm business. CHECKOUT RACHYL AND TRAVIS FAMILY FARM at Travisfamilyfarm.com A new feature on our podcast will be a Q and A session, called ASK HOMESTEADY. Each episode we will feature Questions asked by our Audiance in the podcast. To have a question answered just leave a question in the comments section of our Youtube Channel with the hastag #askhomesteady. This episodes question... Goats Milk vs Cows Milk vs Sheeps Milk... which is best for your homestead? Sign up to our email list so you don't miss any of our videos here - https://www.thisishomesteady.com/join-homesteady-movement/ SUBSCRIBE to our PODCAST HERE - https://www.thisishomesteady.com/subscribe-podcast/ LOVE HOMESTEADY? Help us keep it going! Becoming a Pioneer - You get instant access to the new forum, discounts, and homesteading classes and podcasts! https://www.thisishomesteady.com/head-west-become-pioneer/ Are you shopping at Amazon? Shop through our Amsteady Link http://www.amsteady.com Just click that link then do your regular shopping, it doesn’t cost you any extra but we earn a commission for sending you there. AFFILIATE LINKS To The HOMESTEADING GEAR I use everyday -https://www.thisishomesteady.com/gear-use/ Get Homesteady Tee Shirts (and other clothing) Here - https://shop.spreadshirt.com/homesteady/

40 MINAUG 6
Comments
17 Year Old's Secret - How She Built a Successful Family Farm Business With GOATS!

10 Factors to Growing a PROFITABLE HOMESTEAD - with Accountant Mike

CLICK HERE TO BECOME A PIONEER FOR NEW LOW PRICE Homesteading roots began with people trying to turn their life around by making a profit. Signed into law in May 1862, the Homestead Act opened up settlement in the western United States, allowing any American, including freed slaves, to put in a claim for up to 160 free acres of federal land. Modern Homesteading is similar. Google pallet homestead projects and you will know, it's often people with little, that dream big. But dreaming and reality are 2 different things. Is it possible to run a profitable homestead? Let's see if our guest can help. GUEST INFO : Accountant Mike Mike currently works as a Senior Accountant at DiLeo & Charles. He has spent about a decade working providing accounting, tax, and consulting services to small business clients and high net worth families. He uses his extensive knowledge of tax and financial statements to help small business owners set and achieve business goals, both financial and otherwise. He currently specializes in strategic planning, income tax reduction, and cash flow management for small businesses. When he isn’t working Mike enjoys following Formula 1 and playing peek-a-boo with his infant daughter. What is a profit? Profit : a financial gain, especially the difference between the amount earned and the amount spent in buying, operating, or producing something. 2 - advantage; benefit. TO BE PROFITABLE SOMETHING MUST PRODUCE MORE THAN IT CONSUMES A profitable garden produces more than it consumes. A profitable chicken produces more than it consumes. A profitable Homestead produces more than it consumes. To find out if we are running a profitable homestead we need to identify what is produced, what is consumed, and see if there is a gain in the difference. The 7 Costs Every Homestead Has to Cover Startup Costs - land, Infrastructure, fencing (Generally Amortized Costs) Running Costs - more than feed, Electricity, water, taxes on land, Surprise Costs - Vet bills, storm damage Finishing costs - butcher, packaging, storage TIME and Labor Opportunity Costs - time spent raising egg laying chickens could be spent driving for uber WASTE - Veggies grown not eaten, eggs go bad The PASTURED POULTRY PACKET is good at this. 3 Ways to Profit From Your Homestead Direct Products - lettuce, eggs, milk, cheese, REPLACING WHAT YOUR BUYING Indirect products - manure, land management, (BUT NOT UNLESS NEEDED, if you don’t NEED manure in your life it’s not brown gold) Sales - selling excess How much do you charge above your costs? Accountant Mike suggests a MINIMUM of 10%!

78 MINJUL 9
Comments
10 Factors to Growing a PROFITABLE HOMESTEAD - with Accountant Mike

THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY YEAR 1 AT OUR NEW HOMESTEAD

We are settled into our new homestead. Finally. But it was a LOT of work getting to this point. When our homestead in CT went onto the market to be sold things moved quickly. In just 10 days we had an offer on the place and accepted it. Suddenly we needed a place to live in PA WAY FASTER than we expected. We needed to figure out what we were going to live in. We have wanted to live in a Yurt for almost as long as we have been married. The dream of the yurt resurfaced. We needed a inexpensive structure that could house us for at least a few months, that we could put up quickly. The yurt seemed like a perfect idea. But a harder look at the yurt, and the expense, made us decide otherwise. On the family farm there was already a Pole Barn build, with insulated walls and electricity run to it. The shell was done, and upstairs above the pole barn was 1000 square feet of unfinished space. It was a no brainer. The yurt dream had to die… once again. Maybe someday K and I will wind up as empty nesters, living our days withinthe round cozy walls of a yurt. But for now, that remains just a dream. Work began on the pole barn.Turning an unfinished pole barn into a home takes a LOT of materials! The upstairs space was wide open. The floors were plywood, and the walls and ceilings metal. There was big LED lights on the ceiling and electric already run, but the rest of what we needed to put into the house we needed to buy or scrounge. We purchased lumber, sheetrock, flooring, paint, and all the hardware and supplies needed to build the interior. In addition to those supplies we needed to buy a toilett, 2 sinks, and bathtub. We put in a washer, dryer, and dishwasher. Also we added an electric hot water heater and 2 heat/AC units. The kitchen cabinets were a steal for us, as we had a family member who was turning a home into a salon and was getting rid of an entire kitchen, cabinets, stove and fridge. That we got for FREE and it was a big savings to us! The only added expense to the kitchen was the counter tops that needed to be made to match the new layout. We couldn’t DIY the entire project, we would need to hire some contractors. We wanted to finish the space all ourself, but unfortunately we still had a farm in CT to run (until move out day) and so we could only dedicate 1 week to working on turning the pole barn upstairs into a living space. We spent about $30,000 turning this unfinished space into a beautiful little living space for our large family. When the dust settled, about 12,000 was spent on supplies and materials for the space, and between the carpenters, electricians, and plumbers we spent about 18,000 on labor. All and all it was worth it. Our family had a great space to live in for the last year while the second house on the family farm was being built, and now that we are out of the pole barn, we have a great guest space for visitors, and I have a awesome office to run my business out of. Once the place we need to live in was built we could move onto the new homestead. Since we had moved onto a homestead once before we had a good idea of what NOT to do and what we should spend our time doing on our new homestead. 3 Things You Don’t Want To Do On Your New Homestead DON’T Invest a Whole Bunch Of Time and Money On Infrastructure. DON’T Get New Animals Right Away. DON’T Expect to Make Money Right Away. You are going to make mistakes the first year. Mistakes are a natural way we learn. The first time you burned your hand on something hot you learned not to touch hot things in the future. If you avoid these 3 mistakes you will be ahead of us when we were new homesteaders, and you will get to learn your own lessons the hard way So what should you spend time doing on your new homestead? Take walks daily on your new property. Get to know it. Spend some time learning it. Whatever you see on those walks… capture it. Photos, journals, videos, whatever way you can capture what you are observing on your walks. Setup temporary movabl

69 MINMAY 6
Comments
THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY YEAR 1 AT OUR NEW HOMESTEAD

Selling and Moving Away from Our Beloved Homestead was Hard

A year ago this podcast disappeared. We announced we were moving, selling our homestead in CT, and headed to a new farm in PA. We said that you would be getting updates from us as we went on this journey to our new home in the state of PA. Then silence. In our official Season 2 of Homesteady, we start to fill you in on what happened, where we went, and what is going to happen going forward. In this first episode, brought to you by the Homesteady Pioneers (BECOME ONE HERE) we talk about selling Squash Hollow Farm, our farm in CT and Moving to PA. The truth is we have been talking about doing this for years. K's Dad has been trying to get us to move to PA for the last decade. K grew up on the 100 acre family farm, and her dad wanted us to take it over. K loved the land, the location, and was excited about the idea of being close to her family again. I was the hold out. My entire life was spent in CT. My friends, family, all my roots were there. The older a tree gets the HARDER it is t...

69 MINAPR 5
Comments
Selling and Moving Away from Our Beloved Homestead was Hard

THE PODCAST IS COMING BACK! AND YOU CAN BE ON IT...

WHAT HAPPENED TO THE HOMESTEADY PODCAST? It has been almost 1 year since we released a podcast. What happened? We talk about that in this little announcement episode... I have been busy working on our Podcast studio! The studio is almost done, and now we are taking submissions to get you on our show! Do you have a homesteading story to share? Want to discuss a topic with us on the podcast? Submit an application to get on our show by CLICKING HERE --- https://www.thisishomesteady.com/guest-application/

7 MINFEB 19
Comments
THE PODCAST IS COMING BACK! AND YOU CAN BE ON IT...

We Are Leaving Our Homestead...

A very big announcement on todays episode of the podcast! K and Aust sit down and share with you some very big news that you don't want to miss out on... Sign up to our email list so you don't miss any of our videos here - https://www.thisishomesteady.com/join-homesteady-movement/ In Friday’s Video we announced our big move. https://youtu.be/pMufdfVZN-A You had a lot of questions, so we address those, and hopefully more, in todays episode! SUBSCRIBE to our PODCAST HERE - iTunes - https://goo.gl/oWorJB Stitcher - https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/homesteady LOVE HOMESTEADY? Help us keep it going! Becoming a Pioneer - You get instant access to the new forum, discounts, and homesteading classes and podcasts! https://www.thisishomesteady.com/head-west-become-pioneer/ Shopping at Amazon through our Amsteady Link - http://www.amsteady.com Just click that link then do your regular shopping, we get a bonus!

27 MIN2018 MAR 12
Comments
We Are Leaving Our Homestead...

Goats - Evil Gremlins or Big Money Makers?

On this episode of Homesteady, we continue our Homestead Business Side Hustle Series and interview Dan Arms, of the Arms Family Homestead (Find him here and here). Dan's successful business? Goats. Would you believe that a goat solved the problems of an entire country? Believe it, and learn all about it here. We meet Dan through the story of the loss of his mom. He cites it as a strong influence in his first career as a state trooper. He was raised by his dad on a homestead with a small cattle herd, hunting, fishing, and spending his days outside. Growing up as a homesteader was a confidence building experience for Dan, and as an adult he took over the family farm after his dad's passing. After ending his cow raising days due to cost, Dan went back to the land as a hobby gardener. Unexpectedly, the garden grew into a small homestead business, as Dan's community started asking him for fresh fruits and vegetables from his garden.However, Dan's business growth was stymied when his work...

59 MIN2018 FEB 26
Comments
Goats - Evil Gremlins or Big Money Makers?

How To Make $10,000 From Your Homestead This Year

On this episode of Homesteady, we meet Elaine Vandiver of Old Homestead Alpacas. Elaine's journey to her purpose began on 9/11. A college student at the time, She felt the right thing for her to do was the join the army and serve her country. Now, she's an alpaca farmer. Wait, what? Let's back up. We met Elaine in the Homesteady Launchpad business course hosted by Aust and Accountant Mike. Elaine is currently finding success in agrotourism- giving tourists an "on-farm" experience that is projected to net $11,000 this year. Elaine isn't from Walla Walla Washington. Originally from Indiana, Elaine completed a successful military career and followed her then boyfriend (now husband) to Washington State. Falling in love with the beautiful landscape, they put down their roots. Elaine credits her time in the military for giving her invaluable perspective, and assisting her success in homesteading. Elaine felt that the time she spent as a solider helped her become a stronger person and put ...

62 MIN2018 FEB 5
Comments
How To Make $10,000 From Your Homestead This Year

Using a Homestead Business to Design the Life You Want

Sometimes the most obvious way of solving a problem is not the best way. On this episode of Homesteady, we explore our most valuable non-renewable resource: time. Beginning with the story of the Village on the Hill, we see that looking outside the box for a different solution may be the best way for us to achieve our goals. In part two of our ten part Homestead Business Series (miss part one? Listen here) we head to North Idaho to meet Dan Ohmann on his grassfed homestead. How did this police-officer-turned-stay-at-home-dad-and-farmer do it? On the surface, we see a couple and a child living on a homestead raising lamb and pastured poultry. Dan's spouse still works a traditional job in the software industry, and they gross approximately $2,250 from their meaty side hustle. Like so many of us, the arrival of his first child inspired Dan and his wife to escape their HOA-ruled suburb for something different. Dan decided he needed to take a lot more responsibility for his resources-name...

66 MIN2018 JAN 15
Comments
Using a Homestead Business to Design the Life You Want

Latest Episodes

Your First Cow - Basics, Safety and Where to Start

Karin grew up on a mixed family farm in Alberta, Canada, raising and selling backgrounding stocker steers. Her main passion since she was little was with the cattle, from handling to pasture management. She currently works as a forage-beef extension specialist with the provincial government and is working towards getting into farming of her own some day. She shares thoughts, and advice on all things cattle at her website https://www.bovinepracticum.com/ Karin is coming on the show to talk about working with Cattle. She will help us cover safety, how to make their life as comfortable as possible,and share some tips and tricks to working with cattle.

33 MIN3 weeks ago
Comments
Your First Cow - Basics, Safety and Where to Start

17 Year Old's Secret - How She Built a Successful Family Farm Business With GOATS!

In this episode of the Podcast, we interview Rachyl Travis, of Travis Family Farm. At 9 years old, milking her first goat, Rachyl had no idea that someday she would be running a successful family farm business. A pet goat given to her at 9 years old soon turned into multiple goats, and when Rachyl wound up with 15 goats in milk, and 15 gallons of milk a day to process, she had to figure out something to do with all of the milk. Rachyl didn’t want the milk to go to waste. She enlisted the help of her older sister and together they came up with the first goat milk product: the famous goat milk soap. In June 2012, Rachyl’s Goat Milk Soap was born after family and friends raved about the soap they received as gifts and asked to buy it! Now Rachyl sells her product in many stores and farmers markets through out Rhode Island with her mom and sister at her side! Rachyl shares her story, and the secret to overcoming fear when starting your own farm business. CHECKOUT RACHYL AND TRAVIS FAMILY FARM at Travisfamilyfarm.com A new feature on our podcast will be a Q and A session, called ASK HOMESTEADY. Each episode we will feature Questions asked by our Audiance in the podcast. To have a question answered just leave a question in the comments section of our Youtube Channel with the hastag #askhomesteady. This episodes question... Goats Milk vs Cows Milk vs Sheeps Milk... which is best for your homestead? Sign up to our email list so you don't miss any of our videos here - https://www.thisishomesteady.com/join-homesteady-movement/ SUBSCRIBE to our PODCAST HERE - https://www.thisishomesteady.com/subscribe-podcast/ LOVE HOMESTEADY? Help us keep it going! Becoming a Pioneer - You get instant access to the new forum, discounts, and homesteading classes and podcasts! https://www.thisishomesteady.com/head-west-become-pioneer/ Are you shopping at Amazon? Shop through our Amsteady Link http://www.amsteady.com Just click that link then do your regular shopping, it doesn’t cost you any extra but we earn a commission for sending you there. AFFILIATE LINKS To The HOMESTEADING GEAR I use everyday -https://www.thisishomesteady.com/gear-use/ Get Homesteady Tee Shirts (and other clothing) Here - https://shop.spreadshirt.com/homesteady/

40 MINAUG 6
Comments
17 Year Old's Secret - How She Built a Successful Family Farm Business With GOATS!

10 Factors to Growing a PROFITABLE HOMESTEAD - with Accountant Mike

CLICK HERE TO BECOME A PIONEER FOR NEW LOW PRICE Homesteading roots began with people trying to turn their life around by making a profit. Signed into law in May 1862, the Homestead Act opened up settlement in the western United States, allowing any American, including freed slaves, to put in a claim for up to 160 free acres of federal land. Modern Homesteading is similar. Google pallet homestead projects and you will know, it's often people with little, that dream big. But dreaming and reality are 2 different things. Is it possible to run a profitable homestead? Let's see if our guest can help. GUEST INFO : Accountant Mike Mike currently works as a Senior Accountant at DiLeo & Charles. He has spent about a decade working providing accounting, tax, and consulting services to small business clients and high net worth families. He uses his extensive knowledge of tax and financial statements to help small business owners set and achieve business goals, both financial and otherwise. He currently specializes in strategic planning, income tax reduction, and cash flow management for small businesses. When he isn’t working Mike enjoys following Formula 1 and playing peek-a-boo with his infant daughter. What is a profit? Profit : a financial gain, especially the difference between the amount earned and the amount spent in buying, operating, or producing something. 2 - advantage; benefit. TO BE PROFITABLE SOMETHING MUST PRODUCE MORE THAN IT CONSUMES A profitable garden produces more than it consumes. A profitable chicken produces more than it consumes. A profitable Homestead produces more than it consumes. To find out if we are running a profitable homestead we need to identify what is produced, what is consumed, and see if there is a gain in the difference. The 7 Costs Every Homestead Has to Cover Startup Costs - land, Infrastructure, fencing (Generally Amortized Costs) Running Costs - more than feed, Electricity, water, taxes on land, Surprise Costs - Vet bills, storm damage Finishing costs - butcher, packaging, storage TIME and Labor Opportunity Costs - time spent raising egg laying chickens could be spent driving for uber WASTE - Veggies grown not eaten, eggs go bad The PASTURED POULTRY PACKET is good at this. 3 Ways to Profit From Your Homestead Direct Products - lettuce, eggs, milk, cheese, REPLACING WHAT YOUR BUYING Indirect products - manure, land management, (BUT NOT UNLESS NEEDED, if you don’t NEED manure in your life it’s not brown gold) Sales - selling excess How much do you charge above your costs? Accountant Mike suggests a MINIMUM of 10%!

78 MINJUL 9
Comments
10 Factors to Growing a PROFITABLE HOMESTEAD - with Accountant Mike

THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY YEAR 1 AT OUR NEW HOMESTEAD

We are settled into our new homestead. Finally. But it was a LOT of work getting to this point. When our homestead in CT went onto the market to be sold things moved quickly. In just 10 days we had an offer on the place and accepted it. Suddenly we needed a place to live in PA WAY FASTER than we expected. We needed to figure out what we were going to live in. We have wanted to live in a Yurt for almost as long as we have been married. The dream of the yurt resurfaced. We needed a inexpensive structure that could house us for at least a few months, that we could put up quickly. The yurt seemed like a perfect idea. But a harder look at the yurt, and the expense, made us decide otherwise. On the family farm there was already a Pole Barn build, with insulated walls and electricity run to it. The shell was done, and upstairs above the pole barn was 1000 square feet of unfinished space. It was a no brainer. The yurt dream had to die… once again. Maybe someday K and I will wind up as empty nesters, living our days withinthe round cozy walls of a yurt. But for now, that remains just a dream. Work began on the pole barn.Turning an unfinished pole barn into a home takes a LOT of materials! The upstairs space was wide open. The floors were plywood, and the walls and ceilings metal. There was big LED lights on the ceiling and electric already run, but the rest of what we needed to put into the house we needed to buy or scrounge. We purchased lumber, sheetrock, flooring, paint, and all the hardware and supplies needed to build the interior. In addition to those supplies we needed to buy a toilett, 2 sinks, and bathtub. We put in a washer, dryer, and dishwasher. Also we added an electric hot water heater and 2 heat/AC units. The kitchen cabinets were a steal for us, as we had a family member who was turning a home into a salon and was getting rid of an entire kitchen, cabinets, stove and fridge. That we got for FREE and it was a big savings to us! The only added expense to the kitchen was the counter tops that needed to be made to match the new layout. We couldn’t DIY the entire project, we would need to hire some contractors. We wanted to finish the space all ourself, but unfortunately we still had a farm in CT to run (until move out day) and so we could only dedicate 1 week to working on turning the pole barn upstairs into a living space. We spent about $30,000 turning this unfinished space into a beautiful little living space for our large family. When the dust settled, about 12,000 was spent on supplies and materials for the space, and between the carpenters, electricians, and plumbers we spent about 18,000 on labor. All and all it was worth it. Our family had a great space to live in for the last year while the second house on the family farm was being built, and now that we are out of the pole barn, we have a great guest space for visitors, and I have a awesome office to run my business out of. Once the place we need to live in was built we could move onto the new homestead. Since we had moved onto a homestead once before we had a good idea of what NOT to do and what we should spend our time doing on our new homestead. 3 Things You Don’t Want To Do On Your New Homestead DON’T Invest a Whole Bunch Of Time and Money On Infrastructure. DON’T Get New Animals Right Away. DON’T Expect to Make Money Right Away. You are going to make mistakes the first year. Mistakes are a natural way we learn. The first time you burned your hand on something hot you learned not to touch hot things in the future. If you avoid these 3 mistakes you will be ahead of us when we were new homesteaders, and you will get to learn your own lessons the hard way So what should you spend time doing on your new homestead? Take walks daily on your new property. Get to know it. Spend some time learning it. Whatever you see on those walks… capture it. Photos, journals, videos, whatever way you can capture what you are observing on your walks. Setup temporary movabl

69 MINMAY 6
Comments
THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY YEAR 1 AT OUR NEW HOMESTEAD

Selling and Moving Away from Our Beloved Homestead was Hard

A year ago this podcast disappeared. We announced we were moving, selling our homestead in CT, and headed to a new farm in PA. We said that you would be getting updates from us as we went on this journey to our new home in the state of PA. Then silence. In our official Season 2 of Homesteady, we start to fill you in on what happened, where we went, and what is going to happen going forward. In this first episode, brought to you by the Homesteady Pioneers (BECOME ONE HERE) we talk about selling Squash Hollow Farm, our farm in CT and Moving to PA. The truth is we have been talking about doing this for years. K's Dad has been trying to get us to move to PA for the last decade. K grew up on the 100 acre family farm, and her dad wanted us to take it over. K loved the land, the location, and was excited about the idea of being close to her family again. I was the hold out. My entire life was spent in CT. My friends, family, all my roots were there. The older a tree gets the HARDER it is t...

69 MINAPR 5
Comments
Selling and Moving Away from Our Beloved Homestead was Hard

THE PODCAST IS COMING BACK! AND YOU CAN BE ON IT...

WHAT HAPPENED TO THE HOMESTEADY PODCAST? It has been almost 1 year since we released a podcast. What happened? We talk about that in this little announcement episode... I have been busy working on our Podcast studio! The studio is almost done, and now we are taking submissions to get you on our show! Do you have a homesteading story to share? Want to discuss a topic with us on the podcast? Submit an application to get on our show by CLICKING HERE --- https://www.thisishomesteady.com/guest-application/

7 MINFEB 19
Comments
THE PODCAST IS COMING BACK! AND YOU CAN BE ON IT...

We Are Leaving Our Homestead...

A very big announcement on todays episode of the podcast! K and Aust sit down and share with you some very big news that you don't want to miss out on... Sign up to our email list so you don't miss any of our videos here - https://www.thisishomesteady.com/join-homesteady-movement/ In Friday’s Video we announced our big move. https://youtu.be/pMufdfVZN-A You had a lot of questions, so we address those, and hopefully more, in todays episode! SUBSCRIBE to our PODCAST HERE - iTunes - https://goo.gl/oWorJB Stitcher - https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/homesteady LOVE HOMESTEADY? Help us keep it going! Becoming a Pioneer - You get instant access to the new forum, discounts, and homesteading classes and podcasts! https://www.thisishomesteady.com/head-west-become-pioneer/ Shopping at Amazon through our Amsteady Link - http://www.amsteady.com Just click that link then do your regular shopping, we get a bonus!

27 MIN2018 MAR 12
Comments
We Are Leaving Our Homestead...

Goats - Evil Gremlins or Big Money Makers?

On this episode of Homesteady, we continue our Homestead Business Side Hustle Series and interview Dan Arms, of the Arms Family Homestead (Find him here and here). Dan's successful business? Goats. Would you believe that a goat solved the problems of an entire country? Believe it, and learn all about it here. We meet Dan through the story of the loss of his mom. He cites it as a strong influence in his first career as a state trooper. He was raised by his dad on a homestead with a small cattle herd, hunting, fishing, and spending his days outside. Growing up as a homesteader was a confidence building experience for Dan, and as an adult he took over the family farm after his dad's passing. After ending his cow raising days due to cost, Dan went back to the land as a hobby gardener. Unexpectedly, the garden grew into a small homestead business, as Dan's community started asking him for fresh fruits and vegetables from his garden.However, Dan's business growth was stymied when his work...

59 MIN2018 FEB 26
Comments
Goats - Evil Gremlins or Big Money Makers?

How To Make $10,000 From Your Homestead This Year

On this episode of Homesteady, we meet Elaine Vandiver of Old Homestead Alpacas. Elaine's journey to her purpose began on 9/11. A college student at the time, She felt the right thing for her to do was the join the army and serve her country. Now, she's an alpaca farmer. Wait, what? Let's back up. We met Elaine in the Homesteady Launchpad business course hosted by Aust and Accountant Mike. Elaine is currently finding success in agrotourism- giving tourists an "on-farm" experience that is projected to net $11,000 this year. Elaine isn't from Walla Walla Washington. Originally from Indiana, Elaine completed a successful military career and followed her then boyfriend (now husband) to Washington State. Falling in love with the beautiful landscape, they put down their roots. Elaine credits her time in the military for giving her invaluable perspective, and assisting her success in homesteading. Elaine felt that the time she spent as a solider helped her become a stronger person and put ...

62 MIN2018 FEB 5
Comments
How To Make $10,000 From Your Homestead This Year

Using a Homestead Business to Design the Life You Want

Sometimes the most obvious way of solving a problem is not the best way. On this episode of Homesteady, we explore our most valuable non-renewable resource: time. Beginning with the story of the Village on the Hill, we see that looking outside the box for a different solution may be the best way for us to achieve our goals. In part two of our ten part Homestead Business Series (miss part one? Listen here) we head to North Idaho to meet Dan Ohmann on his grassfed homestead. How did this police-officer-turned-stay-at-home-dad-and-farmer do it? On the surface, we see a couple and a child living on a homestead raising lamb and pastured poultry. Dan's spouse still works a traditional job in the software industry, and they gross approximately $2,250 from their meaty side hustle. Like so many of us, the arrival of his first child inspired Dan and his wife to escape their HOA-ruled suburb for something different. Dan decided he needed to take a lot more responsibility for his resources-name...

66 MIN2018 JAN 15
Comments
Using a Homestead Business to Design the Life You Want