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My Peace Corps Story

Tyler Lloyd

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My Peace Corps Story
My Peace Corps Story

My Peace Corps Story

Tyler Lloyd

0
Followers
1
Plays
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Peace Corps Volunteer Stories Podcast – Every volunteer has a story. Whats yours?

Latest Episodes

Back to the Beginning – Episode 1 Rebroadcast

On this Episode: * My friend Jordan Wicker, co-host ofthe Speaking Easy Podcast, joins the show to interview me * I talk a little about my Peace Corps service and my new book, Service Disrupted * We discuss the Peace Corps, storytelling, and devel into why I started My Peace Corps Story My Peace Corps Story Where and when did you serve? What did you do? I served as an agriculture and small business volunteer in Burkina Faso from 2012 – 2014. For my primary assignment, I worked with a women’s cooperative that processed and packaged locally harvested rice. What is one of your favorite Peace Corps memories? More than the food I ate or things I saw in West Africa, my most valuable memories were the conversations. It was through the many long hours of conversations that I built friendships and began to see into another culture. In my journals, I recorded one-liners that stood out during the day. To me, these single sentences underscored how my new friends, family, and acquaintances viewed themselves, the world, and me. What do you miss about the Peace Corps? Community, conversations, and connection. As a Peace Corps Volunteer, large portions of my days were spent talking to people in my village. People regularly came over to my house for no other purpose than to say ‘hello’ and make sure everything was well. It was not foreign to spend long hours seated, talking face-to-face. Sometimes, those hours weren’t even spent talking, but rathermerelybeingalongside others. Burkinabé valued conversations and greetings. They were not locked away in their private lives. While smartphones, social media, and a culture of individualism were taking hold in Burkina cities, villages still clung to earnest human connection. At first, the innumerable greetings, salutations, and customary conversations annoyed me. As an American, I didn’t understand why I needed to ask how a person was doing, how their work was going, how their health was, their family, their husband and their kids, before buying tomatoes. The first time I found myself trapped sitting in silence with another person for an hour, simplybeing, I mentally reviewed the long list of ‘better things’ I could be doing instead. Soon, I learned to love these conversations. Love the silence. Love thebeing. Do you have a favorite quote or local saying that you’d like to share? In Dioula, they say, “Jirikurun men o men ji la, a te ke bama ye” or “No matter how long a log stays in the water, it doesn’t become a crocodile.” As a volunteer, I had to recognize that I would always be slightly out of place in Burkina Faso. Rather than fight it, it was much better to come to terms with and accept the fact that I was different—a lesson applicable beyond the Peace Corps. Enjoy this episode? Then be sure toleave a 5-star review on Apple Podcastand help others discover this show.

41 MIN6 days ago
Comments
Back to the Beginning – Episode 1 Rebroadcast

Leaving her Fiancé for the Peace Corps – Jane Hale, Chad 1970-72

Jane Hale served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Chad from 1970 to 1972. She was already proficient in French before applying to the Peace Corps. She began training in Quebec at Sainte-Anne-de-la-Pocatiere, and continued training in Niamey, Niger. Her preparation included teacher training, student teaching, and instruction in Chadian Arabic. In Chad, Hale was stationed in Abéché, where she taught English as a foreign language (TEFL) in a lycée (secondary school) that provided no text books. The interview includes a thoughtful discussion of “cross-cultural training,” as well as a description of the delicate role of a Peace Corps volunteer in an area where there were many European workers. Photos from Jane’s Service Interviewed and recorded by Phyllis Noble, August 8, 2016, as part of the JFK RPCV Oral History Project. Enjoy this episode? Then be sure toleave a 5-star review on Apple Podcastand help others discover this show.

132 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
Leaving her Fiancé for the Peace Corps – Jane Hale, Chad 1970-72

Not all Green Hills and Fresh Coffee – Jane Haines, Colombia 2018-Present

Americans have a lot of preconceived thoughts about Colombia, which range from drug running narcos deep in the jungle to rolling verdant hills filled with coffee plantations. Yet, as with many things, Colombia is far more complex and dynamic than you may think. On this week’s episode, Jane Haines talks about her service as community economic development (CED) volunteer in the Caribbean coast of Colombia. Photos from Jane’s Service Jane Haines’s Peace Corps Story Where and when did you serve? What did you do? I am a community economic development (CED) volunteer in the Caribbean coast of Colombia. I live in a pueblo of about 10,000 located an hour outside of the country’s third largest city of Barranquilla. I’m currently 8.5 months into my service and almost a year into living in Colombia. As CED volunteers, we work with a variety of groups on personal money management, business advising, and entrepreneurship projects. In my site, I’ve worked with agricultural associations, an artisan association, and a small sausage-making business. We also work in the high schools using a curriculum called “Construye Tus Sueños” that was originally created by volunteers in the Dominican Republic and is adapted to the Colombian context. We co-teach the course with local teachers, and at the end of the year students walk away with full-fledged business plans they can execute in their pueblo. I also have a GLOW (Girls Leading Our World) club. I’m currently working with a nearby volunteer to organize a meet up of LGBTQ individuals from our sites. We both realized there are active LGBTQ communities in our towns but they don’t get a lot of formal recognition or funding for activities like other groups. Many also suppress their identities to be more accepted in their communities. When you don’t leave the pueblo very often, it’s hard to realize that there are individuals that share your identity and face similar challenges. So the aim of the project is to start building a network of LGBTQ activists and see what they can accomplish together. I’m really excited about this project, and I think it’s a great example of how PCVs can use an outside perspective to introduce new ideas. What is one of your favorite Peace Corps memories? Right around New Years, a group of my university-aged friends decided to take advantage of their time off from school and do something fun. They held a kite-flying competition on one of the highest hills in our pueblo. December and January are really breezy months, and the wind is extra strong in my site because we’re close to the ocean. Everyone came with handmade kites and some were awarded prizes for creativity and how high they could fly them. It was such a picture perfect moment as the sun was setting over the town with all the kits flying and the community coming together like that. That night, we returned to the hilltop for an evening of stargazing. We made “tinto” (black instant coffee loaded with sugar) and a big pot of popcorn. We spent the whole night up there and it is the only time I’ve ever truly been cold on the coast of Colombia. The wind blew the entire night and we all huddled together in blankets and sweatshirts with droopy eyes. I was so relieved to see the sun finally come up so I could descend the mountain and go home and sleep. It was just such a classic Peace Corps memory that made me feel really integrated and happy to be living here. Another favorite memory has been getting to know a family that lives in one of the rural towns where I work. They have three daughters who are all so bright and amazing. They really took me in like another daughter, inviting me to the beach with them and cooking for me and checking up to see how I’m doing, despite living pretty far from the town where I live. On my birthday, they were the first ones to call at 8 AM (before...

48 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
Not all Green Hills and Fresh Coffee – Jane Haines, Colombia 2018-Present

Latest Episodes

Back to the Beginning – Episode 1 Rebroadcast

On this Episode: * My friend Jordan Wicker, co-host ofthe Speaking Easy Podcast, joins the show to interview me * I talk a little about my Peace Corps service and my new book, Service Disrupted * We discuss the Peace Corps, storytelling, and devel into why I started My Peace Corps Story My Peace Corps Story Where and when did you serve? What did you do? I served as an agriculture and small business volunteer in Burkina Faso from 2012 – 2014. For my primary assignment, I worked with a women’s cooperative that processed and packaged locally harvested rice. What is one of your favorite Peace Corps memories? More than the food I ate or things I saw in West Africa, my most valuable memories were the conversations. It was through the many long hours of conversations that I built friendships and began to see into another culture. In my journals, I recorded one-liners that stood out during the day. To me, these single sentences underscored how my new friends, family, and acquaintances viewed themselves, the world, and me. What do you miss about the Peace Corps? Community, conversations, and connection. As a Peace Corps Volunteer, large portions of my days were spent talking to people in my village. People regularly came over to my house for no other purpose than to say ‘hello’ and make sure everything was well. It was not foreign to spend long hours seated, talking face-to-face. Sometimes, those hours weren’t even spent talking, but rathermerelybeingalongside others. Burkinabé valued conversations and greetings. They were not locked away in their private lives. While smartphones, social media, and a culture of individualism were taking hold in Burkina cities, villages still clung to earnest human connection. At first, the innumerable greetings, salutations, and customary conversations annoyed me. As an American, I didn’t understand why I needed to ask how a person was doing, how their work was going, how their health was, their family, their husband and their kids, before buying tomatoes. The first time I found myself trapped sitting in silence with another person for an hour, simplybeing, I mentally reviewed the long list of ‘better things’ I could be doing instead. Soon, I learned to love these conversations. Love the silence. Love thebeing. Do you have a favorite quote or local saying that you’d like to share? In Dioula, they say, “Jirikurun men o men ji la, a te ke bama ye” or “No matter how long a log stays in the water, it doesn’t become a crocodile.” As a volunteer, I had to recognize that I would always be slightly out of place in Burkina Faso. Rather than fight it, it was much better to come to terms with and accept the fact that I was different—a lesson applicable beyond the Peace Corps. Enjoy this episode? Then be sure toleave a 5-star review on Apple Podcastand help others discover this show.

41 MIN6 days ago
Comments
Back to the Beginning – Episode 1 Rebroadcast

Leaving her Fiancé for the Peace Corps – Jane Hale, Chad 1970-72

Jane Hale served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Chad from 1970 to 1972. She was already proficient in French before applying to the Peace Corps. She began training in Quebec at Sainte-Anne-de-la-Pocatiere, and continued training in Niamey, Niger. Her preparation included teacher training, student teaching, and instruction in Chadian Arabic. In Chad, Hale was stationed in Abéché, where she taught English as a foreign language (TEFL) in a lycée (secondary school) that provided no text books. The interview includes a thoughtful discussion of “cross-cultural training,” as well as a description of the delicate role of a Peace Corps volunteer in an area where there were many European workers. Photos from Jane’s Service Interviewed and recorded by Phyllis Noble, August 8, 2016, as part of the JFK RPCV Oral History Project. Enjoy this episode? Then be sure toleave a 5-star review on Apple Podcastand help others discover this show.

132 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
Leaving her Fiancé for the Peace Corps – Jane Hale, Chad 1970-72

Not all Green Hills and Fresh Coffee – Jane Haines, Colombia 2018-Present

Americans have a lot of preconceived thoughts about Colombia, which range from drug running narcos deep in the jungle to rolling verdant hills filled with coffee plantations. Yet, as with many things, Colombia is far more complex and dynamic than you may think. On this week’s episode, Jane Haines talks about her service as community economic development (CED) volunteer in the Caribbean coast of Colombia. Photos from Jane’s Service Jane Haines’s Peace Corps Story Where and when did you serve? What did you do? I am a community economic development (CED) volunteer in the Caribbean coast of Colombia. I live in a pueblo of about 10,000 located an hour outside of the country’s third largest city of Barranquilla. I’m currently 8.5 months into my service and almost a year into living in Colombia. As CED volunteers, we work with a variety of groups on personal money management, business advising, and entrepreneurship projects. In my site, I’ve worked with agricultural associations, an artisan association, and a small sausage-making business. We also work in the high schools using a curriculum called “Construye Tus Sueños” that was originally created by volunteers in the Dominican Republic and is adapted to the Colombian context. We co-teach the course with local teachers, and at the end of the year students walk away with full-fledged business plans they can execute in their pueblo. I also have a GLOW (Girls Leading Our World) club. I’m currently working with a nearby volunteer to organize a meet up of LGBTQ individuals from our sites. We both realized there are active LGBTQ communities in our towns but they don’t get a lot of formal recognition or funding for activities like other groups. Many also suppress their identities to be more accepted in their communities. When you don’t leave the pueblo very often, it’s hard to realize that there are individuals that share your identity and face similar challenges. So the aim of the project is to start building a network of LGBTQ activists and see what they can accomplish together. I’m really excited about this project, and I think it’s a great example of how PCVs can use an outside perspective to introduce new ideas. What is one of your favorite Peace Corps memories? Right around New Years, a group of my university-aged friends decided to take advantage of their time off from school and do something fun. They held a kite-flying competition on one of the highest hills in our pueblo. December and January are really breezy months, and the wind is extra strong in my site because we’re close to the ocean. Everyone came with handmade kites and some were awarded prizes for creativity and how high they could fly them. It was such a picture perfect moment as the sun was setting over the town with all the kits flying and the community coming together like that. That night, we returned to the hilltop for an evening of stargazing. We made “tinto” (black instant coffee loaded with sugar) and a big pot of popcorn. We spent the whole night up there and it is the only time I’ve ever truly been cold on the coast of Colombia. The wind blew the entire night and we all huddled together in blankets and sweatshirts with droopy eyes. I was so relieved to see the sun finally come up so I could descend the mountain and go home and sleep. It was just such a classic Peace Corps memory that made me feel really integrated and happy to be living here. Another favorite memory has been getting to know a family that lives in one of the rural towns where I work. They have three daughters who are all so bright and amazing. They really took me in like another daughter, inviting me to the beach with them and cooking for me and checking up to see how I’m doing, despite living pretty far from the town where I live. On my birthday, they were the first ones to call at 8 AM (before...

48 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
Not all Green Hills and Fresh Coffee – Jane Haines, Colombia 2018-Present

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