title

Oral Argument

Joe Miller and Christian Turner

10
Followers
17
Plays
Oral Argument
Oral Argument

Oral Argument

Joe Miller and Christian Turner

10
Followers
17
Plays
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About Us

A podcast about law, law school, legal theory, and other nerdy things that interest us.

Latest Episodes

Episode 204: Theocracy

We discuss new calls to integrate church and state. The conversation ranges over liberalism, religion, religious zeal, and, obviously, some nonsense. Micah Schwartzman and Jocelyn Wilson, The Unreasonableness of Catholic Integralism Adrian Vermeule, Integration from Within Christina Deardurff, "The Depths of the Church Are Not to Be Disturbed": An interview with Adrian Vermeule

91 MINOCT 14
Comments
Episode 204: Theocracy

Episode 203: Fifty-Four

On immaturity, defensiveness, art, the intellect, models, and the self. And mailbag on scholarship and practice, Title VII, and Star Trek. It's Joe's birthday.

103 MINSEP 9
Comments
Episode 203: Fifty-Four

Episode 202: Conversations

We discuss dictionaries, up and down on maps, and excellence in seminar conversation. Joseph Miller, Suggestions for Law School Seminars Seminar Skills – Learning Collaboratively

84 MINAUG 24
Comments
Episode 202: Conversations

Episode 201: The Bag

Just Joe and Christian, lumbering into season 2, talking about tipping and fraud in the gig economy, bar exam fiascos, legal scholarship, and fireworks. Andy Newman, DoorDash Changes Tipping Model After Uproar From Customers Donna Hershkowitz, The State Bar of California, Statement on July 2019 Bar Exam Release of General Topics Oral Argument 61: Minimum Competence (guest Derek Muller) The Weeds, Vox's podcast for politics and policy, the episode Dysfunctional Federalism with David Schleicher is accessible within their player or, obv, in your podcast app

105 MINJUL 29
Comments
Episode 201: The Bag

Episode 200: Cite Me, Don't Slight Me

We kick off Season 2 with assorted nonsense before diving into our second SCOTUS round-up, which consists entirely of the Supreme Court's decision on the census citizenship question. Dep't of Commerce v. New York

131 MINJUL 9
Comments
Episode 200: Cite Me, Don't Slight Me

Episode 199: Offended Observer

We discuss items from the mailbag and go ahead and conduct our annual, absurd Supreme Court round-up (fifty minutes in). James Macleod, Ordinary Causation: A Study in Experimental Statutory Interpretation Obriecht v. Splinter Johari Canty, Florida Deputies Find Sign Warning Drivers About Upcoming Speed Trap American Legion v. American Humanist Ass'n Knick v. Township of Scott

131 MINJUN 23
Comments
Episode 199: Offended Observer

Episode 198: The Means of Randomization

How would you feel if you found out you were unwittingly the subject of an experiment testing two alternatives? You got A, and another group got B. Many people object to this. But what if neither A nor B was at all objectionable and in fact each is served up at many other places unilaterally and without reason for preferring one to the other? Why should we object to being randomly given A or B for the purpose of testing, when we would not object to having either uniformly and arbitrarily imposed? We are joined again by Michelle Meyer to discuss this problem, made famous recently by Facebook and other A/B testing entrepreneurs. Michelle Meyer’s web page, faculty profile, and writing Michelle Meyer et al., Objecting to Experiments that Compare Two Unobjectionable Policies or Treatments Oral Argument 72: The Guinea Pig Problem (guest Michelle Meyer) Special Guest: Michelle Meyer.

93 MINMAY 28
Comments
Episode 198: The Means of Randomization

Episode 197: LARPing

We talk about LARPing, emotions, meaning, exam writing, grading, happiness, and other things. Lawrence S. Krieger and Kennon M. Sheldon, What Makes Lawyers Happy? A Data-Driven Prescription to Redefine Professional Success

87 MINMAY 16
Comments
Episode 197: LARPing

Episode 196: It at Least Exists

Is the common law efficient? Richard Posner, among many others, has argued that it is, perhaps even without judges ever themselves focusing on that goal. Daniel Sokol joins us to discuss how understanding law as a platform, like modular and open-source software platforms, helps to see how some areas of the law might indeed become more efficient over time while others might not. Daniel Sokol's faculty profile and writing Daniel Sokol, Rethinking the Efficiency of the Common Law Special Guest: Daniel Sokol.

76 MINAPR 22
Comments
Episode 196: It at Least Exists

Episode 195: Based

We dip back into the mailbag to discuss verdicts, unpublished opinions, "based off," canons and anti-canons, and more.

79 MINAPR 8
Comments
Episode 195: Based

Latest Episodes

Episode 204: Theocracy

We discuss new calls to integrate church and state. The conversation ranges over liberalism, religion, religious zeal, and, obviously, some nonsense. Micah Schwartzman and Jocelyn Wilson, The Unreasonableness of Catholic Integralism Adrian Vermeule, Integration from Within Christina Deardurff, "The Depths of the Church Are Not to Be Disturbed": An interview with Adrian Vermeule

91 MINOCT 14
Comments
Episode 204: Theocracy

Episode 203: Fifty-Four

On immaturity, defensiveness, art, the intellect, models, and the self. And mailbag on scholarship and practice, Title VII, and Star Trek. It's Joe's birthday.

103 MINSEP 9
Comments
Episode 203: Fifty-Four

Episode 202: Conversations

We discuss dictionaries, up and down on maps, and excellence in seminar conversation. Joseph Miller, Suggestions for Law School Seminars Seminar Skills – Learning Collaboratively

84 MINAUG 24
Comments
Episode 202: Conversations

Episode 201: The Bag

Just Joe and Christian, lumbering into season 2, talking about tipping and fraud in the gig economy, bar exam fiascos, legal scholarship, and fireworks. Andy Newman, DoorDash Changes Tipping Model After Uproar From Customers Donna Hershkowitz, The State Bar of California, Statement on July 2019 Bar Exam Release of General Topics Oral Argument 61: Minimum Competence (guest Derek Muller) The Weeds, Vox's podcast for politics and policy, the episode Dysfunctional Federalism with David Schleicher is accessible within their player or, obv, in your podcast app

105 MINJUL 29
Comments
Episode 201: The Bag

Episode 200: Cite Me, Don't Slight Me

We kick off Season 2 with assorted nonsense before diving into our second SCOTUS round-up, which consists entirely of the Supreme Court's decision on the census citizenship question. Dep't of Commerce v. New York

131 MINJUL 9
Comments
Episode 200: Cite Me, Don't Slight Me

Episode 199: Offended Observer

We discuss items from the mailbag and go ahead and conduct our annual, absurd Supreme Court round-up (fifty minutes in). James Macleod, Ordinary Causation: A Study in Experimental Statutory Interpretation Obriecht v. Splinter Johari Canty, Florida Deputies Find Sign Warning Drivers About Upcoming Speed Trap American Legion v. American Humanist Ass'n Knick v. Township of Scott

131 MINJUN 23
Comments
Episode 199: Offended Observer

Episode 198: The Means of Randomization

How would you feel if you found out you were unwittingly the subject of an experiment testing two alternatives? You got A, and another group got B. Many people object to this. But what if neither A nor B was at all objectionable and in fact each is served up at many other places unilaterally and without reason for preferring one to the other? Why should we object to being randomly given A or B for the purpose of testing, when we would not object to having either uniformly and arbitrarily imposed? We are joined again by Michelle Meyer to discuss this problem, made famous recently by Facebook and other A/B testing entrepreneurs. Michelle Meyer’s web page, faculty profile, and writing Michelle Meyer et al., Objecting to Experiments that Compare Two Unobjectionable Policies or Treatments Oral Argument 72: The Guinea Pig Problem (guest Michelle Meyer) Special Guest: Michelle Meyer.

93 MINMAY 28
Comments
Episode 198: The Means of Randomization

Episode 197: LARPing

We talk about LARPing, emotions, meaning, exam writing, grading, happiness, and other things. Lawrence S. Krieger and Kennon M. Sheldon, What Makes Lawyers Happy? A Data-Driven Prescription to Redefine Professional Success

87 MINMAY 16
Comments
Episode 197: LARPing

Episode 196: It at Least Exists

Is the common law efficient? Richard Posner, among many others, has argued that it is, perhaps even without judges ever themselves focusing on that goal. Daniel Sokol joins us to discuss how understanding law as a platform, like modular and open-source software platforms, helps to see how some areas of the law might indeed become more efficient over time while others might not. Daniel Sokol's faculty profile and writing Daniel Sokol, Rethinking the Efficiency of the Common Law Special Guest: Daniel Sokol.

76 MINAPR 22
Comments
Episode 196: It at Least Exists

Episode 195: Based

We dip back into the mailbag to discuss verdicts, unpublished opinions, "based off," canons and anti-canons, and more.

79 MINAPR 8
Comments
Episode 195: Based
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