title

The Partially Examined Life

Mark Linsenmayer

665
Followers
2.2K
Plays
The Partially Examined Life
The Partially Examined Life

The Partially Examined Life

Mark Linsenmayer

665
Followers
2.2K
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

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About Us

The Partially Examined Life is a philosophy podcast by some guys who were at one point set on doing philosophy for a living but then thought better of it. Each episode, we pick a short text and chat about it with some balance between insight and flippancy. You don't have to know any philosophy, or even to have read the text we're talking about to (mostly) follow and (hopefully) enjoy the discussion. For links to the texts we discuss and other info, check out www.partiallyexaminedlife.com.We also feature episodes from other podcasts by our hosts to round out your partially examined life, including Pretty Much Pop (prettymuchpop.com, covering all media), Nakedly Examined Music (nakedlyexaminedmusic.com, deconstructing songs), and (sub)Text (lit, film, psychoanalysis). Learn about more network podcasts at partiallyexaminedlife.com.

Latest Episodes

Ep. 229: Descartes's Rules for Thinking (Part Three)

Concluding René Descartes's Rules for Direction of the Mind (1628). We finish rule 12 through the end, talking about simples, the faculties of intuition and judgment, perception and imagination, necessary vs. contingent truths, and how to do Cartesian science, including what constitutes a "perfectly understood problem." Start with part one, or get the full, ad-free Citizen Edition.Please support PEL! End song: "Perfect Design" by Ian Moore, as interviewed on Nakedly Examined Music #94. Sponsors: Get 20% off at nativedeodorant.com (code PEL), $10 off at skylightframe.com (code PEL), 20% off at hempfusion.com (code PEL), and learn about St. John's College at sjc.edu. Boston-area listeners can see Wes live talking Joker on 11/22; see partiallyexaminedlife.com/joker.

57 MIN16 h ago
Comments
Ep. 229: Descartes's Rules for Thinking (Part Three)

Ep. 229: Descartes's Rules for Thinking (Part Two)

Continuing on René Descartes's Rules for Direction of the Mind (1628), covering rules 7 through the first part of the lengthy rule 12. We try to figure out what he means by "enumeration;" the faculties of imagination, sense and memory; the virtues of perspicacity and sagacity; his psychology of the senses, the "common sense" where all sense data comes together, and the understanding; how Descartes recommends we do scientific investigation; why syllogisms stink; and whether some people are just better at philosophy than others. Start with part 1. You don't need to wait for part 3; get the full, Citizen Edition now. Citizen Edition now? Please support PEL! Sponsor: Get 3 months of unlimited learning for $30 at thegreatcoursesplus.com/PEL.

53 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Ep. 229: Descartes's Rules for Thinking (Part Two)

NEM#109: Producer Guy Sigsworth (Seal, Björk, etc.) Goes Solo

Guy has been a highly sought-after British producer/keyboardist since the early '90s and is just now releasing his debut album, STET. We discuss "Mono No Aware" and "Dorian" from that album and "Unravel" from Björk's Homogenic (1997). End song: "Let's Go" by Frou Frou from Details (2002). Intro: "Crazy," co-written with Seal from his debut album (1991). Hear more Nakedly Examined Music. Like our Facebook page. Support us on Patreon. Sponsor: Visit masterclass.com/EXAMINED for 15% off a MasterClass All-Access Pass.

76 MIN1 w ago
Comments
NEM#109: Producer Guy Sigsworth (Seal, Björk, etc.) Goes Solo

Pretty Much Pop #18: Stephen King's Media Empire

Is the most popular writer of our time actually a good writer? Or maybe he used to be good? While you've been thinking about those questions, King already wrote another book, so ha! Mark, Erica, and Brian share their experiences with and opinions about King's oeuvre and the films and shows that have come out of it. For more, visit prettymuchpop.com. Hear bonus content for this episode at patreon.com/prettymuchpop. This podcast is part of the Partially Examined Life network and is curated by openculture.com.

54 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Pretty Much Pop #18: Stephen King's Media Empire

Ep. 229: Descartes's Rules for Thinking (Part One)

On René Descartes's Rules for Direction of the Mind (1628). Is there a careful way to approach problems that will ensure that you'll always be right? What if you just never assert anything you can't be sure of? This is Descartes's strategy, modeled on mathematics. We likewise carefully move step-by-step through this text. This is part 1 of 3; get the whole discussion now via theCitizen Edition now? Please support PEL! Sponsor: VisitHempFusion.comfor CBD supplements and use code PEL at check-out for 20% off/free shipping.

50 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Ep. 229: Descartes's Rules for Thinking (Part One)

Pretty Much Pop #17: Comedy as Philosophy w/ Daniel Lobell

Are stand-up comedians the Modern Day Philosophers? This is the premise of Daniel's podcast, but really, only some comedians express original claims; many just tell jokes. Are those exceptional comics philosophizing? Does telling the whole, tragic truth rule out being funny? Daniel, Mark, Erica, and Brian consider Carlin, Gadsby, Chappelle, and others. For more, visit prettymuchpop.com.Hear bonus content for this episode atpatreon.com/prettymuchpop. This podcast is part of the Partially Examined Life podcast network and is curated by openculture.com. Sponsor:Visit Keeps.com/EXAMINED for a free month of hair loss treatment.

45 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Pretty Much Pop #17: Comedy as Philosophy w/ Daniel Lobell

Ep. 228: Social Construction of Race (Appiah, Mills) (Part Two)

EContinuing on Kwame Anthony Appiah's "Race, Culture, Identity: Misunderstood Connections" (1994), Charles Mills's "But What Are You Really?, The Metaphysics of Race" (1998), and Neven Sesardic's "Race: A Social Destruction of a Biological Concept" (2010) with guest Coleman Hughes. Racial classifications vary geographically, therefore race is socially constructed. Given this, can we retain the positive aspects of group-identification without hierarchies and what Appiah calls "imperialism of identity?" Start with part one or get the full, ad-free Citizen Edition. Please support PEL! End song: "Tired Skin" by Alejandro Escovedo, as interviewed on Nakedly Examined Music #60. Sponsors: Get 3 months of unlimited learning for $30 at thegreatcoursesplus.com/PEL. Don't get left behind the now: subscribe to Pretty Much Pop.

47 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Ep. 228: Social Construction of Race (Appiah, Mills) (Part Two)

Pretty Much Pop #16: 25 Years After FRIENDS

Mark, Erica, and Brianexamine the conventions, techniques, and staying power of the beloved '90s sitcom. Are we supposed to identify with, or idolize, or merely like these people? What makes the formula work, did it sustain itself over its 10-year run, was it successfully replicated, and what parts haven't aged well? For more, visit prettymuchpop.com.Hear bonus content for this episode atpatreon.com/prettymuchpop. This podcast is part of the Partially Examined Life podcast network and is curated by openculture.com. Sponsor: Visit mackweldon.com and enter the promo code POP for 20% off.

43 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Pretty Much Pop #16: 25 Years After FRIENDS

Ep. 228: Social Construction of Race (Appiah, Mills) (Part One)

On Kwame Anthony Appiah's "Race, Culture, Identity: Misunderstood Connections" (1994), Charles Mills's "But What Are You Really?, The Metaphysics of Race" (1998), and Neven Sesardic's "Race: A Social Destruction of a Biological Concept" (2010). With guest Coleman Hughes. Don't wait for part two; get your full, ad-free Citizen Edition now. Please support PEL! Sponsors: NativeDeodorant.com (code PEL for 20% off), $15/month wireless at mintmobile.com/PEL, HempFusion.com(code PEL for 20% off/free shipping).

42 MINOCT 21
Comments
Ep. 228: Social Construction of Race (Appiah, Mills) (Part One)

Pretty Much Pop #15: Opera as Pop

Opera used to be a central part of European pop culture, Pavarotti was as big a pop star as they come. But still, it's now the quintessential art-form of the wealthy and snobbish. What gives? Guest Sean Spyres from Springfield Regional Opera joins his sister Erica along with Mark and Brian to discuss opera's place in culture (including its film appearances), how it's different from music theater, the challenges it faces and how it might become more relevant. For more, visit prettymuchpop.com.Hear bonus content for this episode atpatreon.com/prettymuchpop. This podcast is part of the Partially Examined Life podcast network and is curated by openculture.com.

41 MINOCT 16
Comments
Pretty Much Pop #15: Opera as Pop

Latest Episodes

Ep. 229: Descartes's Rules for Thinking (Part Three)

Concluding René Descartes's Rules for Direction of the Mind (1628). We finish rule 12 through the end, talking about simples, the faculties of intuition and judgment, perception and imagination, necessary vs. contingent truths, and how to do Cartesian science, including what constitutes a "perfectly understood problem." Start with part one, or get the full, ad-free Citizen Edition.Please support PEL! End song: "Perfect Design" by Ian Moore, as interviewed on Nakedly Examined Music #94. Sponsors: Get 20% off at nativedeodorant.com (code PEL), $10 off at skylightframe.com (code PEL), 20% off at hempfusion.com (code PEL), and learn about St. John's College at sjc.edu. Boston-area listeners can see Wes live talking Joker on 11/22; see partiallyexaminedlife.com/joker.

57 MIN16 h ago
Comments
Ep. 229: Descartes's Rules for Thinking (Part Three)

Ep. 229: Descartes's Rules for Thinking (Part Two)

Continuing on René Descartes's Rules for Direction of the Mind (1628), covering rules 7 through the first part of the lengthy rule 12. We try to figure out what he means by "enumeration;" the faculties of imagination, sense and memory; the virtues of perspicacity and sagacity; his psychology of the senses, the "common sense" where all sense data comes together, and the understanding; how Descartes recommends we do scientific investigation; why syllogisms stink; and whether some people are just better at philosophy than others. Start with part 1. You don't need to wait for part 3; get the full, Citizen Edition now. Citizen Edition now? Please support PEL! Sponsor: Get 3 months of unlimited learning for $30 at thegreatcoursesplus.com/PEL.

53 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Ep. 229: Descartes's Rules for Thinking (Part Two)

NEM#109: Producer Guy Sigsworth (Seal, Björk, etc.) Goes Solo

Guy has been a highly sought-after British producer/keyboardist since the early '90s and is just now releasing his debut album, STET. We discuss "Mono No Aware" and "Dorian" from that album and "Unravel" from Björk's Homogenic (1997). End song: "Let's Go" by Frou Frou from Details (2002). Intro: "Crazy," co-written with Seal from his debut album (1991). Hear more Nakedly Examined Music. Like our Facebook page. Support us on Patreon. Sponsor: Visit masterclass.com/EXAMINED for 15% off a MasterClass All-Access Pass.

76 MIN1 w ago
Comments
NEM#109: Producer Guy Sigsworth (Seal, Björk, etc.) Goes Solo

Pretty Much Pop #18: Stephen King's Media Empire

Is the most popular writer of our time actually a good writer? Or maybe he used to be good? While you've been thinking about those questions, King already wrote another book, so ha! Mark, Erica, and Brian share their experiences with and opinions about King's oeuvre and the films and shows that have come out of it. For more, visit prettymuchpop.com. Hear bonus content for this episode at patreon.com/prettymuchpop. This podcast is part of the Partially Examined Life network and is curated by openculture.com.

54 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Pretty Much Pop #18: Stephen King's Media Empire

Ep. 229: Descartes's Rules for Thinking (Part One)

On René Descartes's Rules for Direction of the Mind (1628). Is there a careful way to approach problems that will ensure that you'll always be right? What if you just never assert anything you can't be sure of? This is Descartes's strategy, modeled on mathematics. We likewise carefully move step-by-step through this text. This is part 1 of 3; get the whole discussion now via theCitizen Edition now? Please support PEL! Sponsor: VisitHempFusion.comfor CBD supplements and use code PEL at check-out for 20% off/free shipping.

50 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Ep. 229: Descartes's Rules for Thinking (Part One)

Pretty Much Pop #17: Comedy as Philosophy w/ Daniel Lobell

Are stand-up comedians the Modern Day Philosophers? This is the premise of Daniel's podcast, but really, only some comedians express original claims; many just tell jokes. Are those exceptional comics philosophizing? Does telling the whole, tragic truth rule out being funny? Daniel, Mark, Erica, and Brian consider Carlin, Gadsby, Chappelle, and others. For more, visit prettymuchpop.com.Hear bonus content for this episode atpatreon.com/prettymuchpop. This podcast is part of the Partially Examined Life podcast network and is curated by openculture.com. Sponsor:Visit Keeps.com/EXAMINED for a free month of hair loss treatment.

45 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Pretty Much Pop #17: Comedy as Philosophy w/ Daniel Lobell

Ep. 228: Social Construction of Race (Appiah, Mills) (Part Two)

EContinuing on Kwame Anthony Appiah's "Race, Culture, Identity: Misunderstood Connections" (1994), Charles Mills's "But What Are You Really?, The Metaphysics of Race" (1998), and Neven Sesardic's "Race: A Social Destruction of a Biological Concept" (2010) with guest Coleman Hughes. Racial classifications vary geographically, therefore race is socially constructed. Given this, can we retain the positive aspects of group-identification without hierarchies and what Appiah calls "imperialism of identity?" Start with part one or get the full, ad-free Citizen Edition. Please support PEL! End song: "Tired Skin" by Alejandro Escovedo, as interviewed on Nakedly Examined Music #60. Sponsors: Get 3 months of unlimited learning for $30 at thegreatcoursesplus.com/PEL. Don't get left behind the now: subscribe to Pretty Much Pop.

47 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Ep. 228: Social Construction of Race (Appiah, Mills) (Part Two)

Pretty Much Pop #16: 25 Years After FRIENDS

Mark, Erica, and Brianexamine the conventions, techniques, and staying power of the beloved '90s sitcom. Are we supposed to identify with, or idolize, or merely like these people? What makes the formula work, did it sustain itself over its 10-year run, was it successfully replicated, and what parts haven't aged well? For more, visit prettymuchpop.com.Hear bonus content for this episode atpatreon.com/prettymuchpop. This podcast is part of the Partially Examined Life podcast network and is curated by openculture.com. Sponsor: Visit mackweldon.com and enter the promo code POP for 20% off.

43 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Pretty Much Pop #16: 25 Years After FRIENDS

Ep. 228: Social Construction of Race (Appiah, Mills) (Part One)

On Kwame Anthony Appiah's "Race, Culture, Identity: Misunderstood Connections" (1994), Charles Mills's "But What Are You Really?, The Metaphysics of Race" (1998), and Neven Sesardic's "Race: A Social Destruction of a Biological Concept" (2010). With guest Coleman Hughes. Don't wait for part two; get your full, ad-free Citizen Edition now. Please support PEL! Sponsors: NativeDeodorant.com (code PEL for 20% off), $15/month wireless at mintmobile.com/PEL, HempFusion.com(code PEL for 20% off/free shipping).

42 MINOCT 21
Comments
Ep. 228: Social Construction of Race (Appiah, Mills) (Part One)

Pretty Much Pop #15: Opera as Pop

Opera used to be a central part of European pop culture, Pavarotti was as big a pop star as they come. But still, it's now the quintessential art-form of the wealthy and snobbish. What gives? Guest Sean Spyres from Springfield Regional Opera joins his sister Erica along with Mark and Brian to discuss opera's place in culture (including its film appearances), how it's different from music theater, the challenges it faces and how it might become more relevant. For more, visit prettymuchpop.com.Hear bonus content for this episode atpatreon.com/prettymuchpop. This podcast is part of the Partially Examined Life podcast network and is curated by openculture.com.

41 MINOCT 16
Comments
Pretty Much Pop #15: Opera as Pop
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