title

The Partially Examined Life

Mark Linsenmayer

533
Followers
1.6K
Plays
The Partially Examined Life
The Partially Examined Life

The Partially Examined Life

Mark Linsenmayer

533
Followers
1.6K
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

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About Us

The Partially Examined Life is a philosophy podcast by some guys who were at one point set on doing philosophy for a living but then thought better of it. Each episode, we pick a short text and chat about it with some balance between insight and flippancy. You don't have to know any philosophy, or even to have read the text we're talking about to (mostly) follow and (hopefully) enjoy the discussion. For links to the texts we discuss and other info, check out www.partiallyexaminedlife.com.We also feature episodes from other podcasts by our hosts to round out your partially examined life, including Pretty Much Pop (prettymuchpop.com, covering all media), Nakedly Examined Music (nakedlyexaminedmusic.com, deconstructing songs), and (sub)Text (lit, film, psychoanalysis). Learn about more network podcasts at partiallyexaminedlife.com.

Latest Episodes

Ep. 228: Social Construction of Race (Appiah, Mills) (Part One)

On Kwame Anthony Appiah's "Race, Culture, Identity: Misunderstood Connections" (1994), Charles Mills's "But What Are You Really?, The Metaphysics of Race" (1998), and Neven Sesardic's "Race: A Social Destruction of a Biological Concept" (2010). With guest Coleman Hughes. Don't wait for part two; get your full, ad-free Citizen Edition now. Please support PEL! Sponsors: NativeDeodorant.com (code PEL for 20% off), $15/month wireless at mintmobile.com/PEL, HempFusion.com(code PEL for 20% off/free shipping).

42 MIN10 h ago
Comments
Ep. 228: Social Construction of Race (Appiah, Mills) (Part One)

Ep. 227: What Is Social Construction? (Hacking, Berger) (Part Two)

Continuing Ian Hacking’s The Social Construction of What (1999) and Peter Berger's “Religion and World Construction" (1967). We break down Hacking's typology of construction arguments: Are they exploring where our ideas came from or trying to change things? Are they trying to state facts about nature vs. nurture or essentially political solicitations for us to reconceptualize in healthier ways? Plus, more about thesupposed divide between science wars and the culture wars and Berger's picture of the nomos (custom) defining what it is for us to live a meaningful life. Start withpart one, or get the full, ad freeCitizen Edition.Please support PEL! End song: "The ConstruKction of Light, Part 1" by King Crimson; listen to Mark with Trey Gunn on Nakedly Examined Music #21. Sponsors: Visit thegreatcoursesplus.com/PEL for a free month of learning andhempfusion.com w/ promo code PEL for 20% off your first order & free shipping.

66 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Ep. 227: What Is Social Construction? (Hacking, Berger) (Part Two)

NEM#107: Barry Andrews (Shriekback): Objectifications of Groove

EBarry started in '77 playing keys with XTC and after two albums started his own band Shriekback in '81, with whom he's had 14 releases plus some solo albums. He's known for inventive soundscapes placed over solid grooves and philosophical lyrics delivered in a low chant. We discuss three Shriekback tunes: "Such, Such Are the Joys" from Why Anything? Why This? (2018), "Amaryllis in the Sprawl" from Glory Bumps (2007), and "Stimulate the Beaded Hamster"/"Pond Life" from Naked Apes and Pond Life (2000). We conclude by listening to a solo tune, "Virgin of the Ladder" by Barry Andrews from Contaminated Pop (2019). Intro: "Nemesis" from Oil & Gold (1985). For more, see shriekback.com. Sponsor: Visit masterclass.com/EXAMINED for $30 off a MasterClass All-Access Pass. Hear more Nakedly Examined Music. Like our Facebook page. Support us on Patreon.

74 MIN1 w ago
Comments
NEM#107: Barry Andrews (Shriekback): Objectifications of Groove

Pretty Much Pop #14: UFOs on TV with Investigative Journalist Paul Beban

TV news reporter Paul Beban (ABC, Al Jazeera, Yahoo, and now featured on the Discovery Network's Contact) joins Mark, Erica, and Brian to discuss the appeal of UFO narratives. Do you have to believe to be entertained? What's the connection to humor, religion, and anti-government venom? For more, visit prettymuchpop.com.Hear bonus content for this episode atpatreon.com/prettymuchpop. This podcast is part of the Partially Examined Life podcast network and is curated by openculture.com.

38 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Pretty Much Pop #14: UFOs on TV with Investigative Journalist Paul Beban

Ep. 227: What Is Social Construction? (Hacking, Berger) (Part One)

EOn Ian Hacking’s The Social Construction of What (1999) and Peter Berger's “Religion and World Construction" (1967). Guest Coleman Hughes from Dilemma joins us to survey the types of social construction arguments: the "culture wars" (e.g. race, gender) and the "science wars" (scientific findings are not read off the world but emerge from history). Something can be constructed, yet still be an objective truth we have to deal with. Don't wait for part two; get the full, ad free Citizen Edition now. Please support PEL! Sponsor: Visit hempfusion.com w/ promo code PEL for 20% off & free shipping.

45 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Ep. 227: What Is Social Construction? (Hacking, Berger) (Part One)

Pretty Much Pop #13: TV Revivals Revived!

Revivals (not to be confused with reboots) can bring us back to the comfort of old friends, who are now really old. But is reviving a show really ever a good idea? Mark, Erica, and Brian consider some successes, failures, and hypotheticals. For more, visit prettymuchpop.com.Hear bonus content for this episode atpatreon.com/prettymuchpop. This podcast is part of the Partially Examined Life podcast network and is curated by openculture.com.

39 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Pretty Much Pop #13: TV Revivals Revived!

Ep. 226: Francis Bacon Invents Science (Part Two)

Continuing on Sir Francis Bacon's New Organon (1620). We cover more of Bacon's "idols" and how Bacon divides religion from science (and what this means politically). We then move on to book 2, including Bacon's novel update of the term "form," and take a look at Bacon's method of doing science by filling out tables before actually doing experiments. Start with part one or get the full, unbroken Citizen Edition. Please support PEL, like, getPatreon's feed for a mere $1/month. End song: "Stuck in a Cave" by Chrome Cranks; hear Mark talk to singer/songwriter Peter Aaron on Nakedly Examined Music #93. Sponsor: Get three months of unlimited access to The Great Courses Plus at thegreatcoursesplus.com/PEL.

63 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Ep. 226: Francis Bacon Invents Science (Part Two)

Pretty Much Pop #12: Once Upon a Tarantino Film

Wes Alwan joins Mark, Erica, and Brianto discuss Quentin Tarantino's Once Upon a Time... In Hollywood in the context of Tarantino's other films. We consider T'sstrange sense of pacing, his comic violence, his historical revisionism, and casting choices.Is this a brilliant film or a fundamentally misguided idea badly in need of an editor? For more, visit prettymuchpop.com.Hear bonus content for this episode atpatreon.com/prettymuchpop. This podcast is part of the Partially Examined Life podcast network and is curated by openculture.com.

47 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Pretty Much Pop #12: Once Upon a Tarantino Film

Ep. 226: Francis Bacon Invents Science (Part One)

On Sir Francis Bacon's New Organon (1620). Bacon claims to have developed a new toolset that will open up nature to inquiry in a way that wasn't possible for ancient and modern natural philosophy. Mark, Wes, and Dylan consider how much what Bacon describes resembles modern scientific method, talk through Bacon's "four idols" that interfere with impartial inquiry, and consider how Bacon's method fits in with his larger political-ethical-religious views. Don't wait for part two; get the full, unbroken Citizen Edition now. Please support PEL!

43 MINSEP 23
Comments
Ep. 226: Francis Bacon Invents Science (Part One)

Pretty Much Pop #11: The Live Music Experience

Dave Hamilton (from Gig Gab) joinsMark, Erica, and Brian to weigh concert-going (and theater-going) against the technological alternatives. Why are tickets so pricey? Do tribute bands fulfill our needs? Should audiences ideally be on drugs? These are but a few of the questions we breeze through. For more, visit prettymuchpop.com.Hear bonus content for this episode atpatreon.com/prettymuchpop. This podcast is part of the Partially Examined Life podcast network and is curated by openculture.com.

49 MINSEP 17
Comments
Pretty Much Pop #11: The Live Music Experience

Latest Episodes

Ep. 228: Social Construction of Race (Appiah, Mills) (Part One)

On Kwame Anthony Appiah's "Race, Culture, Identity: Misunderstood Connections" (1994), Charles Mills's "But What Are You Really?, The Metaphysics of Race" (1998), and Neven Sesardic's "Race: A Social Destruction of a Biological Concept" (2010). With guest Coleman Hughes. Don't wait for part two; get your full, ad-free Citizen Edition now. Please support PEL! Sponsors: NativeDeodorant.com (code PEL for 20% off), $15/month wireless at mintmobile.com/PEL, HempFusion.com(code PEL for 20% off/free shipping).

42 MIN10 h ago
Comments
Ep. 228: Social Construction of Race (Appiah, Mills) (Part One)

Ep. 227: What Is Social Construction? (Hacking, Berger) (Part Two)

Continuing Ian Hacking’s The Social Construction of What (1999) and Peter Berger's “Religion and World Construction" (1967). We break down Hacking's typology of construction arguments: Are they exploring where our ideas came from or trying to change things? Are they trying to state facts about nature vs. nurture or essentially political solicitations for us to reconceptualize in healthier ways? Plus, more about thesupposed divide between science wars and the culture wars and Berger's picture of the nomos (custom) defining what it is for us to live a meaningful life. Start withpart one, or get the full, ad freeCitizen Edition.Please support PEL! End song: "The ConstruKction of Light, Part 1" by King Crimson; listen to Mark with Trey Gunn on Nakedly Examined Music #21. Sponsors: Visit thegreatcoursesplus.com/PEL for a free month of learning andhempfusion.com w/ promo code PEL for 20% off your first order & free shipping.

66 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Ep. 227: What Is Social Construction? (Hacking, Berger) (Part Two)

NEM#107: Barry Andrews (Shriekback): Objectifications of Groove

EBarry started in '77 playing keys with XTC and after two albums started his own band Shriekback in '81, with whom he's had 14 releases plus some solo albums. He's known for inventive soundscapes placed over solid grooves and philosophical lyrics delivered in a low chant. We discuss three Shriekback tunes: "Such, Such Are the Joys" from Why Anything? Why This? (2018), "Amaryllis in the Sprawl" from Glory Bumps (2007), and "Stimulate the Beaded Hamster"/"Pond Life" from Naked Apes and Pond Life (2000). We conclude by listening to a solo tune, "Virgin of the Ladder" by Barry Andrews from Contaminated Pop (2019). Intro: "Nemesis" from Oil & Gold (1985). For more, see shriekback.com. Sponsor: Visit masterclass.com/EXAMINED for $30 off a MasterClass All-Access Pass. Hear more Nakedly Examined Music. Like our Facebook page. Support us on Patreon.

74 MIN1 w ago
Comments
NEM#107: Barry Andrews (Shriekback): Objectifications of Groove

Pretty Much Pop #14: UFOs on TV with Investigative Journalist Paul Beban

TV news reporter Paul Beban (ABC, Al Jazeera, Yahoo, and now featured on the Discovery Network's Contact) joins Mark, Erica, and Brian to discuss the appeal of UFO narratives. Do you have to believe to be entertained? What's the connection to humor, religion, and anti-government venom? For more, visit prettymuchpop.com.Hear bonus content for this episode atpatreon.com/prettymuchpop. This podcast is part of the Partially Examined Life podcast network and is curated by openculture.com.

38 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Pretty Much Pop #14: UFOs on TV with Investigative Journalist Paul Beban

Ep. 227: What Is Social Construction? (Hacking, Berger) (Part One)

EOn Ian Hacking’s The Social Construction of What (1999) and Peter Berger's “Religion and World Construction" (1967). Guest Coleman Hughes from Dilemma joins us to survey the types of social construction arguments: the "culture wars" (e.g. race, gender) and the "science wars" (scientific findings are not read off the world but emerge from history). Something can be constructed, yet still be an objective truth we have to deal with. Don't wait for part two; get the full, ad free Citizen Edition now. Please support PEL! Sponsor: Visit hempfusion.com w/ promo code PEL for 20% off & free shipping.

45 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Ep. 227: What Is Social Construction? (Hacking, Berger) (Part One)

Pretty Much Pop #13: TV Revivals Revived!

Revivals (not to be confused with reboots) can bring us back to the comfort of old friends, who are now really old. But is reviving a show really ever a good idea? Mark, Erica, and Brian consider some successes, failures, and hypotheticals. For more, visit prettymuchpop.com.Hear bonus content for this episode atpatreon.com/prettymuchpop. This podcast is part of the Partially Examined Life podcast network and is curated by openculture.com.

39 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Pretty Much Pop #13: TV Revivals Revived!

Ep. 226: Francis Bacon Invents Science (Part Two)

Continuing on Sir Francis Bacon's New Organon (1620). We cover more of Bacon's "idols" and how Bacon divides religion from science (and what this means politically). We then move on to book 2, including Bacon's novel update of the term "form," and take a look at Bacon's method of doing science by filling out tables before actually doing experiments. Start with part one or get the full, unbroken Citizen Edition. Please support PEL, like, getPatreon's feed for a mere $1/month. End song: "Stuck in a Cave" by Chrome Cranks; hear Mark talk to singer/songwriter Peter Aaron on Nakedly Examined Music #93. Sponsor: Get three months of unlimited access to The Great Courses Plus at thegreatcoursesplus.com/PEL.

63 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Ep. 226: Francis Bacon Invents Science (Part Two)

Pretty Much Pop #12: Once Upon a Tarantino Film

Wes Alwan joins Mark, Erica, and Brianto discuss Quentin Tarantino's Once Upon a Time... In Hollywood in the context of Tarantino's other films. We consider T'sstrange sense of pacing, his comic violence, his historical revisionism, and casting choices.Is this a brilliant film or a fundamentally misguided idea badly in need of an editor? For more, visit prettymuchpop.com.Hear bonus content for this episode atpatreon.com/prettymuchpop. This podcast is part of the Partially Examined Life podcast network and is curated by openculture.com.

47 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Pretty Much Pop #12: Once Upon a Tarantino Film

Ep. 226: Francis Bacon Invents Science (Part One)

On Sir Francis Bacon's New Organon (1620). Bacon claims to have developed a new toolset that will open up nature to inquiry in a way that wasn't possible for ancient and modern natural philosophy. Mark, Wes, and Dylan consider how much what Bacon describes resembles modern scientific method, talk through Bacon's "four idols" that interfere with impartial inquiry, and consider how Bacon's method fits in with his larger political-ethical-religious views. Don't wait for part two; get the full, unbroken Citizen Edition now. Please support PEL!

43 MINSEP 23
Comments
Ep. 226: Francis Bacon Invents Science (Part One)

Pretty Much Pop #11: The Live Music Experience

Dave Hamilton (from Gig Gab) joinsMark, Erica, and Brian to weigh concert-going (and theater-going) against the technological alternatives. Why are tickets so pricey? Do tribute bands fulfill our needs? Should audiences ideally be on drugs? These are but a few of the questions we breeze through. For more, visit prettymuchpop.com.Hear bonus content for this episode atpatreon.com/prettymuchpop. This podcast is part of the Partially Examined Life podcast network and is curated by openculture.com.

49 MINSEP 17
Comments
Pretty Much Pop #11: The Live Music Experience