title

Poultry Health Today

Poultry Health Today

1
Followers
0
Plays
Poultry Health Today
Poultry Health Today

Poultry Health Today

Poultry Health Today

1
Followers
0
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Details

About Us

Sponsored By Zoetis

Latest Episodes

Unusual presentation of bacterial septicemia in broilers tied to breeders

An unusual presentation of bacterial septicemia in broilers underscores the importance of obtaining a good history and obtaining input from bird caretakers, David French, DVM, a staff veterinarian with Sanderson Farms, told Poultry Health Today. Broilers in two of the company’s divisions started getting sick at 35 to 40 days of age. There were respiratory signs as well as severe fibrin production in the abdominal cavity, particularly around the heart. “They had a pericarditis, a perihepatitis and a polyserositis that was so dramatic that visiting veterinarians were grabbing their cameras to get pictures of it,” French said. The company’s two divisions are about 120 miles apart, and no connection to the problem could be found regarding movement of birds, people or other epidemiological factors. Two of the breeder flocks were up in age, but another was not, French noted. One company division, however, recognized immediately that the problem was linked to broiler breeder flocks. Th...

8 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Unusual presentation of bacterial septicemia in broilers tied to breeders

Perdue veterinarian seeks answers to inconsistent foodborne pathogen load

Taking a closer look at why incidence of Salmonella and Campylobacter varied widely on farms in the same production system helped to demonstrate the importance of management and communication with growers, Bruce Stewart-Brown, DVM, senior vice president, food safety, quality and live production, Perdue Farms, told Poultry Health Today. In a study of 150 farms over the course of 2 years, Perdue found that for Salmonella, some farms rarely had any, some had a lot and others were in the middle with inconsistent patterns. The company noted similar trends with Campylobacter. “These are [birds from] the same breeder flocks [and] the same breeds, the same feed, coming from the same hatchery, yet they turn out differently” when analyzed for foodborne pathogen trends. “So, there's something about the farm that's significant,” Stewart-Brown said. Fusing NAE, food safety Perdue, which has been at the forefront of “no antibiotics ever” (NAE) production, has found that managing the flock e...

13 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Perdue veterinarian seeks answers to inconsistent foodborne pathogen load

Keys to successful coccidiosis control with a bioshuttle program

Resistance is unlikely to be a problem in coccidiosis bioshuttle programs, Greg Mathis, PhD, Southern Poultry Research, told Poultry Health Today. Bioshuttle programs start with hatchery vaccination against coccidiosis followed by use of an in-feed anticoccidial. Alternative products are also often used, Mathis said. The key to success with bioshuttle programs in no-antibiotics-ever (NAE) production, he said, is allowing immunity to develop after vaccination. Toward that end, Mathis recommended one and a half or two coccidia cycles after vaccination — the coccidial lifecycle being 7 days — before using an in-feed anticoccidial. He cautioned that when an anticoccidial is administered after vaccination, it must not be done too soon because it could kill off vaccinal coccidial oocysts before some immunity has developed. The appropriate time to administer an in-feed anticoccidial is about 14 to 16 days after vaccination, he said. Sensitive oocysts Although coccidial resistance remains...

9 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Keys to successful coccidiosis control with a bioshuttle program

Necrotic enteritis control requires multi-pronged approach in RWA systems

Feeding higher levels of copper and zinc in the diet, managing litter moisture and controlling coccidiosis are keys to stopping necrotic enteritis (NE) in poultry raised without antibiotics (RWA), Dan Moore, PhD, president, Colorado Quality Research, told Poultry Health Today. “We're seeing a very consistent result with copper,” Moore said. Instead of the typical 8 to 10 parts per million inclusion level in the diet, they have used 250 to 275 parts per million in some studies. The combination of copper and zinc in the feed, long used in the swine industry, has also yielded encouraging results in poultry for reducing the incidence of NE, he reported. “We’ve had minerals in the diet for decades, but we’ve used them at fairly low levels, partially because of the form utilized,” Moore added. “Now, with some of the new forms that are coming out and being studied more directly, we can use higher levels and are starting to see some of that difference.” Feed management There is an i...

11 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Necrotic enteritis control requires multi-pronged approach in RWA systems

Avian pathogenic E. coli: Difficult to prevent and control

The bacterium Escherichia coli (E. coli), has re-emerged in broiler operations, said Nicolle Lima Barbieri, researcher at the University of Georgia. The bacterial pathogen’s appearance in broilers seems to coincide with poultry companies’ switch to ‘no antibiotics ever’ (NAE) programs. Avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) is not well understood, she told Poultry Health Today. “Avian pathogenic E. coli gained some genes that we call virulence factors, which make the bacteria able to cause disease,” Barbieri said. “These bacteria in the field can change and virulent genes can transfer from one bacteria to the other.” This is the same E. coli that can cause illness in humans, she added. “Some studies correlate APEC to the same E. coli that causes neonatal meningitis in babies, or urinary tract infections in humans,” she said. Barbieri studied APEC in a project that compared two systems: one utilizing antibiotics in a conventional system; the other in NAE birds. The study compared ...

9 MINOCT 11
Comments
Avian pathogenic E. coli: Difficult to prevent and control

Sentinel broilers, PCR testing help isolate, identify evolving IBV populations in Arkansas

How do you look for new serotypes of a virus that might be circulating in an area? Sentinel birds are a good place to start, according to Abigail Reith, DVM, a technical services veterinarian for Zoetis. In a recent study in Arkansas, she used infectious bronchitis (IB) spires designed to look for serotypes of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), a coronavirus that is a highly infectious respiratory disease in chickens. “We knew that, potentially, we had a new serotype floating around, so we wanted to use the single birds to see if we could isolate [the virus] and identify it in the broiler breeder houses,” she told Poultry Health Today. Sentinel birds are frequently used in the poultry industry to get a better handle on IB serotypes. Reith’s project used 100 sentinel birds that only received a coccidiosis vaccine at the hatchery and then were reared in a facility with no other poultry contact. “At this point, we’re thinking these 28-day-old birds have not been exposed to any sor...

7 MINOCT 8
Comments
Sentinel broilers, PCR testing help isolate, identify evolving IBV populations in Arkansas

Reductions in medically important antimicrobials reflect industry stewardship

Reductions in the use of medically important antimicrobials demonstrate the poultry industry’s commitment to stewardship of these valuable medications, Randall Singer, DVM, MPVM, PhD, told Poultry Health Today. Singer’s comments were based on data reflecting antimicrobial use in poultry from 2013 through 2017. The project is supported by FDA and the US Poultry and Egg Association and has been conducted by Mindwalk Consulting Group, LLC, founded by Singer. Just one example he cited of antimicrobial stewardship is the reduction in the percentage of broilers placed that received an antimicrobial at the hatchery, which dropped from 93% in 2013 to just 17% in 2017, according to an executive summary of the data. “The companies are finding a way to prevent [disease] without that hatchery antimicrobial,” he said, and emphasized that disease prevention should be the goal versus a focus on simply reducing antimicrobial use. Sometimes, Singer pointed out, an antimicrobial administered at t...

19 MINOCT 3
Comments
Reductions in medically important antimicrobials reflect industry stewardship

Helping contract growers transition to no-antibiotics-ever broiler production

Successful transition from conventional to no-antibiotics-ever (NAE) broiler production requires awareness of all the changes needed and lots of advance planning, Tom Tabler. PhD, poultry specialist, Mississippi State University Extension, told Poultry Health Today. Growers particularly need to be on the lookout for potential problems that might arise as a result of changing procedures. One example is the impact of NAE production on the microbial population in litter, Tabler said. “There's good bacteria and bad bacteria that live in the litter inside a chicken house. Whenever someone switches from an antibiotic to an antibiotic-free program…that microbial population is going to shift,” he cautioned. Other changes necessary when transitioning to NAE production include decreasing stocking density and extending downtime between flocks from 14 days to 18 or 20 days. These are measures that will reduce disease pressure, although they will also reduce profitability, Tabler acknowledged...

9 MINSEP 30
Comments
Helping contract growers transition to no-antibiotics-ever broiler production

Better air circulation, moderately lower humidity improve paw quality

Increasing air circulation coupled with moderate reductions in humidity can dramatically improve paw quality, Connie Mou and Michael Czarick, University of Georgia, told Poultry Health Today. By lowering the humidity level to 60% and using circulation fans that increase air movement across the litter to 150 feet per minute, litter dries uniformly across the house. That, in turn, improves paw quality and has the added benefit of reducing ammonia levels, said Mou, graduate research assistant. In one of the studies conducted during winter with three consecutive flocks, this approach to minimizing litter moisture reduced severe footpad lesions by nearly 50%, she said. “We see flock after flock with the same results,” noted Czarick, Extension poultry engineer. Provides compromise Increased ventilation is another way to keep litter drier, but that’s unrealistic due to the expense. “It’s just going to cost too much,” he said. “A little bit of humidity control and some good air movem...

7 MINSEP 24
Comments
Better air circulation, moderately lower humidity improve paw quality

US poultry industry shifting focus to Campylobacter, Salmonella Infantis

The US poultry industry needs to revisit Campylobacter-control strategies in preparation for new performance standards coming from USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS), Ashley Peterson, PhD, senior vice president of scientific and regulatory affairs, National Chicken Council (NCC), told Poultry Health Today. She explained that a few years ago, when FSIS switched to using neutralized buffered peptone water (nBPW) for processing plant detection of pathogens, the numbers for Campylobacter started plummeting. Campylobacter wasn’t surviving the nBPW. That prompted FSIS to change to a more sensitive enrichment testing method, which led to more Campylobacter found in chicken rinsates. Consequently, FSIS has new proposed performance standards for Campylobacter in ground chicken, which it released in August 2019. Will follow suit FSIS is expected to follow suit in late 2019/early 2020 with new proposed Campylobacter performance standards for chicken parts and whole carcasses, P...

13 MINSEP 19
Comments
US poultry industry shifting focus to Campylobacter, Salmonella Infantis

Latest Episodes

Unusual presentation of bacterial septicemia in broilers tied to breeders

An unusual presentation of bacterial septicemia in broilers underscores the importance of obtaining a good history and obtaining input from bird caretakers, David French, DVM, a staff veterinarian with Sanderson Farms, told Poultry Health Today. Broilers in two of the company’s divisions started getting sick at 35 to 40 days of age. There were respiratory signs as well as severe fibrin production in the abdominal cavity, particularly around the heart. “They had a pericarditis, a perihepatitis and a polyserositis that was so dramatic that visiting veterinarians were grabbing their cameras to get pictures of it,” French said. The company’s two divisions are about 120 miles apart, and no connection to the problem could be found regarding movement of birds, people or other epidemiological factors. Two of the breeder flocks were up in age, but another was not, French noted. One company division, however, recognized immediately that the problem was linked to broiler breeder flocks. Th...

8 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Unusual presentation of bacterial septicemia in broilers tied to breeders

Perdue veterinarian seeks answers to inconsistent foodborne pathogen load

Taking a closer look at why incidence of Salmonella and Campylobacter varied widely on farms in the same production system helped to demonstrate the importance of management and communication with growers, Bruce Stewart-Brown, DVM, senior vice president, food safety, quality and live production, Perdue Farms, told Poultry Health Today. In a study of 150 farms over the course of 2 years, Perdue found that for Salmonella, some farms rarely had any, some had a lot and others were in the middle with inconsistent patterns. The company noted similar trends with Campylobacter. “These are [birds from] the same breeder flocks [and] the same breeds, the same feed, coming from the same hatchery, yet they turn out differently” when analyzed for foodborne pathogen trends. “So, there's something about the farm that's significant,” Stewart-Brown said. Fusing NAE, food safety Perdue, which has been at the forefront of “no antibiotics ever” (NAE) production, has found that managing the flock e...

13 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Perdue veterinarian seeks answers to inconsistent foodborne pathogen load

Keys to successful coccidiosis control with a bioshuttle program

Resistance is unlikely to be a problem in coccidiosis bioshuttle programs, Greg Mathis, PhD, Southern Poultry Research, told Poultry Health Today. Bioshuttle programs start with hatchery vaccination against coccidiosis followed by use of an in-feed anticoccidial. Alternative products are also often used, Mathis said. The key to success with bioshuttle programs in no-antibiotics-ever (NAE) production, he said, is allowing immunity to develop after vaccination. Toward that end, Mathis recommended one and a half or two coccidia cycles after vaccination — the coccidial lifecycle being 7 days — before using an in-feed anticoccidial. He cautioned that when an anticoccidial is administered after vaccination, it must not be done too soon because it could kill off vaccinal coccidial oocysts before some immunity has developed. The appropriate time to administer an in-feed anticoccidial is about 14 to 16 days after vaccination, he said. Sensitive oocysts Although coccidial resistance remains...

9 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Keys to successful coccidiosis control with a bioshuttle program

Necrotic enteritis control requires multi-pronged approach in RWA systems

Feeding higher levels of copper and zinc in the diet, managing litter moisture and controlling coccidiosis are keys to stopping necrotic enteritis (NE) in poultry raised without antibiotics (RWA), Dan Moore, PhD, president, Colorado Quality Research, told Poultry Health Today. “We're seeing a very consistent result with copper,” Moore said. Instead of the typical 8 to 10 parts per million inclusion level in the diet, they have used 250 to 275 parts per million in some studies. The combination of copper and zinc in the feed, long used in the swine industry, has also yielded encouraging results in poultry for reducing the incidence of NE, he reported. “We’ve had minerals in the diet for decades, but we’ve used them at fairly low levels, partially because of the form utilized,” Moore added. “Now, with some of the new forms that are coming out and being studied more directly, we can use higher levels and are starting to see some of that difference.” Feed management There is an i...

11 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Necrotic enteritis control requires multi-pronged approach in RWA systems

Avian pathogenic E. coli: Difficult to prevent and control

The bacterium Escherichia coli (E. coli), has re-emerged in broiler operations, said Nicolle Lima Barbieri, researcher at the University of Georgia. The bacterial pathogen’s appearance in broilers seems to coincide with poultry companies’ switch to ‘no antibiotics ever’ (NAE) programs. Avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) is not well understood, she told Poultry Health Today. “Avian pathogenic E. coli gained some genes that we call virulence factors, which make the bacteria able to cause disease,” Barbieri said. “These bacteria in the field can change and virulent genes can transfer from one bacteria to the other.” This is the same E. coli that can cause illness in humans, she added. “Some studies correlate APEC to the same E. coli that causes neonatal meningitis in babies, or urinary tract infections in humans,” she said. Barbieri studied APEC in a project that compared two systems: one utilizing antibiotics in a conventional system; the other in NAE birds. The study compared ...

9 MINOCT 11
Comments
Avian pathogenic E. coli: Difficult to prevent and control

Sentinel broilers, PCR testing help isolate, identify evolving IBV populations in Arkansas

How do you look for new serotypes of a virus that might be circulating in an area? Sentinel birds are a good place to start, according to Abigail Reith, DVM, a technical services veterinarian for Zoetis. In a recent study in Arkansas, she used infectious bronchitis (IB) spires designed to look for serotypes of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), a coronavirus that is a highly infectious respiratory disease in chickens. “We knew that, potentially, we had a new serotype floating around, so we wanted to use the single birds to see if we could isolate [the virus] and identify it in the broiler breeder houses,” she told Poultry Health Today. Sentinel birds are frequently used in the poultry industry to get a better handle on IB serotypes. Reith’s project used 100 sentinel birds that only received a coccidiosis vaccine at the hatchery and then were reared in a facility with no other poultry contact. “At this point, we’re thinking these 28-day-old birds have not been exposed to any sor...

7 MINOCT 8
Comments
Sentinel broilers, PCR testing help isolate, identify evolving IBV populations in Arkansas

Reductions in medically important antimicrobials reflect industry stewardship

Reductions in the use of medically important antimicrobials demonstrate the poultry industry’s commitment to stewardship of these valuable medications, Randall Singer, DVM, MPVM, PhD, told Poultry Health Today. Singer’s comments were based on data reflecting antimicrobial use in poultry from 2013 through 2017. The project is supported by FDA and the US Poultry and Egg Association and has been conducted by Mindwalk Consulting Group, LLC, founded by Singer. Just one example he cited of antimicrobial stewardship is the reduction in the percentage of broilers placed that received an antimicrobial at the hatchery, which dropped from 93% in 2013 to just 17% in 2017, according to an executive summary of the data. “The companies are finding a way to prevent [disease] without that hatchery antimicrobial,” he said, and emphasized that disease prevention should be the goal versus a focus on simply reducing antimicrobial use. Sometimes, Singer pointed out, an antimicrobial administered at t...

19 MINOCT 3
Comments
Reductions in medically important antimicrobials reflect industry stewardship

Helping contract growers transition to no-antibiotics-ever broiler production

Successful transition from conventional to no-antibiotics-ever (NAE) broiler production requires awareness of all the changes needed and lots of advance planning, Tom Tabler. PhD, poultry specialist, Mississippi State University Extension, told Poultry Health Today. Growers particularly need to be on the lookout for potential problems that might arise as a result of changing procedures. One example is the impact of NAE production on the microbial population in litter, Tabler said. “There's good bacteria and bad bacteria that live in the litter inside a chicken house. Whenever someone switches from an antibiotic to an antibiotic-free program…that microbial population is going to shift,” he cautioned. Other changes necessary when transitioning to NAE production include decreasing stocking density and extending downtime between flocks from 14 days to 18 or 20 days. These are measures that will reduce disease pressure, although they will also reduce profitability, Tabler acknowledged...

9 MINSEP 30
Comments
Helping contract growers transition to no-antibiotics-ever broiler production

Better air circulation, moderately lower humidity improve paw quality

Increasing air circulation coupled with moderate reductions in humidity can dramatically improve paw quality, Connie Mou and Michael Czarick, University of Georgia, told Poultry Health Today. By lowering the humidity level to 60% and using circulation fans that increase air movement across the litter to 150 feet per minute, litter dries uniformly across the house. That, in turn, improves paw quality and has the added benefit of reducing ammonia levels, said Mou, graduate research assistant. In one of the studies conducted during winter with three consecutive flocks, this approach to minimizing litter moisture reduced severe footpad lesions by nearly 50%, she said. “We see flock after flock with the same results,” noted Czarick, Extension poultry engineer. Provides compromise Increased ventilation is another way to keep litter drier, but that’s unrealistic due to the expense. “It’s just going to cost too much,” he said. “A little bit of humidity control and some good air movem...

7 MINSEP 24
Comments
Better air circulation, moderately lower humidity improve paw quality

US poultry industry shifting focus to Campylobacter, Salmonella Infantis

The US poultry industry needs to revisit Campylobacter-control strategies in preparation for new performance standards coming from USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS), Ashley Peterson, PhD, senior vice president of scientific and regulatory affairs, National Chicken Council (NCC), told Poultry Health Today. She explained that a few years ago, when FSIS switched to using neutralized buffered peptone water (nBPW) for processing plant detection of pathogens, the numbers for Campylobacter started plummeting. Campylobacter wasn’t surviving the nBPW. That prompted FSIS to change to a more sensitive enrichment testing method, which led to more Campylobacter found in chicken rinsates. Consequently, FSIS has new proposed performance standards for Campylobacter in ground chicken, which it released in August 2019. Will follow suit FSIS is expected to follow suit in late 2019/early 2020 with new proposed Campylobacter performance standards for chicken parts and whole carcasses, P...

13 MINSEP 19
Comments
US poultry industry shifting focus to Campylobacter, Salmonella Infantis
hmly
himalayaプレミアムへようこそ聴き放題のオーディオブックをお楽しみください。