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TED Talks Science and Medicine

TED

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TED Talks Science and Medicine
TED Talks Science and Medicine

TED Talks Science and Medicine

TED

717
Followers
1.0K
Plays
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About Us

Some of the world's greatest scientists, doctors and medical researchers share their discoveries and visions onstage at the TED conference, TEDx events and partner events around the world. You can also download these and many other videos free on TED.com, with an interactive English transcript and subtitles in up to 80 languages. TED is a nonprofit devoted to Ideas Worth Spreading.

Latest Episodes

Clues to prehistoric times, found in blind cavefish | Prosanta Chakrabarty

TED Fellow Prosanta Chakrabarty explores hidden parts of the world in search of new species of cave-dwelling fish. These subterranean creatures have developed fascinating adaptations, and they provide biological insights into blindness as well as geological clues about how the continents broke apart million of years ago. Contemplate deep time in this short talk.

4 MIN2016 JUN 30
Comments
Clues to prehistoric times, found in blind cavefish | Prosanta Chakrabarty

How a blind astronomer found a way to hear the stars | Wanda Diaz Merced

Wanda Diaz Merced studies the light emitted by gamma-ray bursts, the most energetic events in the universe. When she lost her sight and was left without a way to do her science, she had a revelatory insight: the light curves she could no longer see could be translated into sound. Through sonification, she regained mastery over her work, and now she's advocating for a more inclusive scientific community. "Science is for everyone," she says. "It has to be available to everyone, because we are all natural explorers."

11 MIN2016 JUN 27
Comments
How a blind astronomer found a way to hear the stars | Wanda Diaz Merced

Why genetic research must be more diverse | Keolu Fox

Ninety-six percent of genome studies are based on people of European descent. The rest of the world is virtually unrepresented -- and this is dangerous, says geneticist and TED Fellow Keolu Fox, because we react to drugs differently based on our genetic makeup. Fox is working to democratize genome sequencing, specifically by advocating for indigenous populations to get involved in research, with the goal of eliminating health disparities. "The research community needs to immerse itself in indigenous culture," he says, "or die trying."

6 MIN2016 JUN 21
Comments
Why genetic research must be more diverse | Keolu Fox

This scientist makes ears out of apples | Andrew Pelling

TED Fellow Andrew Pelling is a biohacker, and nature is his hardware. His favorite materials are the simplest ones (and oftentimes he finds them in the garbage). Building on the cellulose structure that gives an apple its shape, he "grows" lifelike human ears, pioneering a process that might someday be used to repair body parts safely and cheaply. And he has some even wilder ideas to share ... "What I'm really curious about is if one day it will be possible to repair, rebuild and augment our own bodies with stuff we make in the kitchen," he says.

7 MIN2016 JUN 15
Comments
This scientist makes ears out of apples | Andrew Pelling

A smarter, more precise way to think about public health | Sue Desmond-Hellmann

Sue Desmond-Hellmann is using precision public health -- an approach that incorporates big data, consumer monitoring, gene sequencing and other innovative tools -- to solve the world's most difficult medical problems. It's already helped cut HIV transmission from mothers to babies by nearly half in sub-Saharan Africa, and now it's being used to address alarming infant mortality rates all over the world. The goal: to save lives by bringing the right interventions to the right populations at the right time.

14 MIN2016 MAY 31
Comments
A smarter, more precise way to think about public health | Sue Desmond-Hellmann

This tiny particle could roam your body to find tumors | Sangeeta Bhatia

What if we could find cancerous tumors years before they can harm us -- without expensive screening facilities or even steady electricity? Physician, bioengineer and entrepreneur Sangeeta Bhatia leads a multidisciplinary lab that searches for novel ways to understand, diagnose and treat human disease. Her target: the two-thirds of deaths due to cancer that she says are fully preventable. With remarkable clarity, she breaks down complex nanoparticle science and shares her dream for a radical new cancer test that could save millions of lives.

10 MIN2016 MAY 12
Comments
This tiny particle could roam your body to find tumors | Sangeeta Bhatia

Gene editing can now change an entire species -- forever | Jennifer Kahn

CRISPR gene drives allow scientists to change sequences of DNA and guarantee that the resulting edited genetic trait is inherited by future generations, opening up the possibility of altering entire species forever. More than anything, the technology has led to questions: How will this new power affect humanity? What are we going to use it to change? Are we gods now? Join journalist Jennifer Kahn as she ponders these questions and shares a potentially powerful application of gene drives: the development of disease-resistant mosquitoes that could knock out malaria and Zika.

12 MIN2016 MAY 9
Comments
Gene editing can now change an entire species -- forever | Jennifer Kahn

How to read the genome and build a human being | Riccardo Sabatini

Secrets, disease and beauty are all written in the human genome, the complete set of genetic instructions needed to build a human being. Now, as scientist and entrepreneur Riccardo Sabatini shows us, we have the power to read this complex code, predicting things like height, eye color, age and even facial structure -- all from a vial of blood. And soon, Sabatini says, our new understanding of the genome will allow us to personalize treatments for diseases like cancer. We have the power to change life as we know it. How will we use it?

15 MIN2016 APR 29
Comments
How to read the genome and build a human being | Riccardo Sabatini

Hunting for dinosaurs showed me our place in the universe | Kenneth Lacovara

What happens when you discover a dinosaur? Paleontologist Kenneth Lacovara details his unearthing of Dreadnoughtus -- a 77-million-year-old sauropod that was as tall as a two-story house and as heavy as a jumbo jet -- and considers how amazingly improbable it is that a tiny mammal living in the cracks of the dinosaur world could evolve into a sentient being capable of understanding these magnificent creatures. Join him in a celebration of the Earth's geological history and contemplate our place in deep time.

15 MIN2016 APR 22
Comments
Hunting for dinosaurs showed me our place in the universe | Kenneth Lacovara

We can reprogram life. How to do it wisely | Juan Enriquez

For four billion years, what lived and died on Earth depended on two principles: natural selection and random mutation. Then humans came along and changed everything — hybridizing plants, breeding animals, altering the environment and even purposefully evolving ourselves. Juan Enriquez provides five guidelines for a future where this ability to program life rapidly accelerates. "This is the single most exciting adventure human beings have been on," Enriquez says. "This is the single greatest superpower humans have ever had."

14 MIN2016 APR 20
Comments
We can reprogram life. How to do it wisely | Juan Enriquez

Latest Episodes

Clues to prehistoric times, found in blind cavefish | Prosanta Chakrabarty

TED Fellow Prosanta Chakrabarty explores hidden parts of the world in search of new species of cave-dwelling fish. These subterranean creatures have developed fascinating adaptations, and they provide biological insights into blindness as well as geological clues about how the continents broke apart million of years ago. Contemplate deep time in this short talk.

4 MIN2016 JUN 30
Comments
Clues to prehistoric times, found in blind cavefish | Prosanta Chakrabarty

How a blind astronomer found a way to hear the stars | Wanda Diaz Merced

Wanda Diaz Merced studies the light emitted by gamma-ray bursts, the most energetic events in the universe. When she lost her sight and was left without a way to do her science, she had a revelatory insight: the light curves she could no longer see could be translated into sound. Through sonification, she regained mastery over her work, and now she's advocating for a more inclusive scientific community. "Science is for everyone," she says. "It has to be available to everyone, because we are all natural explorers."

11 MIN2016 JUN 27
Comments
How a blind astronomer found a way to hear the stars | Wanda Diaz Merced

Why genetic research must be more diverse | Keolu Fox

Ninety-six percent of genome studies are based on people of European descent. The rest of the world is virtually unrepresented -- and this is dangerous, says geneticist and TED Fellow Keolu Fox, because we react to drugs differently based on our genetic makeup. Fox is working to democratize genome sequencing, specifically by advocating for indigenous populations to get involved in research, with the goal of eliminating health disparities. "The research community needs to immerse itself in indigenous culture," he says, "or die trying."

6 MIN2016 JUN 21
Comments
Why genetic research must be more diverse | Keolu Fox

This scientist makes ears out of apples | Andrew Pelling

TED Fellow Andrew Pelling is a biohacker, and nature is his hardware. His favorite materials are the simplest ones (and oftentimes he finds them in the garbage). Building on the cellulose structure that gives an apple its shape, he "grows" lifelike human ears, pioneering a process that might someday be used to repair body parts safely and cheaply. And he has some even wilder ideas to share ... "What I'm really curious about is if one day it will be possible to repair, rebuild and augment our own bodies with stuff we make in the kitchen," he says.

7 MIN2016 JUN 15
Comments
This scientist makes ears out of apples | Andrew Pelling

A smarter, more precise way to think about public health | Sue Desmond-Hellmann

Sue Desmond-Hellmann is using precision public health -- an approach that incorporates big data, consumer monitoring, gene sequencing and other innovative tools -- to solve the world's most difficult medical problems. It's already helped cut HIV transmission from mothers to babies by nearly half in sub-Saharan Africa, and now it's being used to address alarming infant mortality rates all over the world. The goal: to save lives by bringing the right interventions to the right populations at the right time.

14 MIN2016 MAY 31
Comments
A smarter, more precise way to think about public health | Sue Desmond-Hellmann

This tiny particle could roam your body to find tumors | Sangeeta Bhatia

What if we could find cancerous tumors years before they can harm us -- without expensive screening facilities or even steady electricity? Physician, bioengineer and entrepreneur Sangeeta Bhatia leads a multidisciplinary lab that searches for novel ways to understand, diagnose and treat human disease. Her target: the two-thirds of deaths due to cancer that she says are fully preventable. With remarkable clarity, she breaks down complex nanoparticle science and shares her dream for a radical new cancer test that could save millions of lives.

10 MIN2016 MAY 12
Comments
This tiny particle could roam your body to find tumors | Sangeeta Bhatia

Gene editing can now change an entire species -- forever | Jennifer Kahn

CRISPR gene drives allow scientists to change sequences of DNA and guarantee that the resulting edited genetic trait is inherited by future generations, opening up the possibility of altering entire species forever. More than anything, the technology has led to questions: How will this new power affect humanity? What are we going to use it to change? Are we gods now? Join journalist Jennifer Kahn as she ponders these questions and shares a potentially powerful application of gene drives: the development of disease-resistant mosquitoes that could knock out malaria and Zika.

12 MIN2016 MAY 9
Comments
Gene editing can now change an entire species -- forever | Jennifer Kahn

How to read the genome and build a human being | Riccardo Sabatini

Secrets, disease and beauty are all written in the human genome, the complete set of genetic instructions needed to build a human being. Now, as scientist and entrepreneur Riccardo Sabatini shows us, we have the power to read this complex code, predicting things like height, eye color, age and even facial structure -- all from a vial of blood. And soon, Sabatini says, our new understanding of the genome will allow us to personalize treatments for diseases like cancer. We have the power to change life as we know it. How will we use it?

15 MIN2016 APR 29
Comments
How to read the genome and build a human being | Riccardo Sabatini

Hunting for dinosaurs showed me our place in the universe | Kenneth Lacovara

What happens when you discover a dinosaur? Paleontologist Kenneth Lacovara details his unearthing of Dreadnoughtus -- a 77-million-year-old sauropod that was as tall as a two-story house and as heavy as a jumbo jet -- and considers how amazingly improbable it is that a tiny mammal living in the cracks of the dinosaur world could evolve into a sentient being capable of understanding these magnificent creatures. Join him in a celebration of the Earth's geological history and contemplate our place in deep time.

15 MIN2016 APR 22
Comments
Hunting for dinosaurs showed me our place in the universe | Kenneth Lacovara

We can reprogram life. How to do it wisely | Juan Enriquez

For four billion years, what lived and died on Earth depended on two principles: natural selection and random mutation. Then humans came along and changed everything — hybridizing plants, breeding animals, altering the environment and even purposefully evolving ourselves. Juan Enriquez provides five guidelines for a future where this ability to program life rapidly accelerates. "This is the single most exciting adventure human beings have been on," Enriquez says. "This is the single greatest superpower humans have ever had."

14 MIN2016 APR 20
Comments
We can reprogram life. How to do it wisely | Juan Enriquez