title

Think101: Conversations

Think101

0
Followers
0
Plays
Think101: Conversations
Think101: Conversations

Think101: Conversations

Think101

0
Followers
0
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Details

About Us

What’s the most efficient way to become an expert? Is it possible to learn something without trying? How do you use the scientific method in everyday life? Can you “nudge” someone to make more optimal choices? In this series, we offer a variety of tools to help you learn and remember information for longer, avoid self-deception, and value data over personal experience. Learn more at think101.org.

Latest Episodes

Episode 11: Epistemic Modesty

In the final chapter of “Mindware,” Nisbett assures the reader that we’re smarter than we were before started the book, and that we’ll now recognise mistakes in the wild. Are you, dear listener, less likely to make the errors in thinking that we’ve been discussing here? When are you likely to make mistakes? When should you rely on other people’s judgements about a domain? There seems to be an element of politeness when interacting with people who make claims, but is it wrong to, say, ask your doctor how often a diagnosis is wrong? Being sceptical about your own claims and expertise seems to be important in making everyday decisions, so how can we develop this epistemic modesty? Does knowing about experimental methodology help you make better decisions? Does is make you more sceptical? Wouldn’t it be nice if everyone asked to see the evidence before important policy decisions were made? How about an Open Science Framework for public policy? Reading: Mindware by Richard Nisbett...

79 MIN2016 OCT 20
Comments
Episode 11: Epistemic Modesty

Episode 10: Simplicity

If a major goal in science is to “Keep It Simple,” what exactly does “simple” mean in this context? Helpful? Useful? Easy to Understand? Should public money only be spent on research that can be explained to folks down at the local pub? Does simplification naturally lead to overgeneralisation? Should the media “keep it simple” when communicating scientific results to the public? The curse of knowledge is clearly operating here. How much does the average person actually know (or need to know) about seemingly simple everyday objects like a zipper, lock, or toilet? What about cognitive explanations about “simple” species like bees, fish, or birds? Are simple explanations ideal in the judgements and decisions that we make everyday?Reading: Mindware by Richard Nisbett, “KISS and Tell.”Guests: Jason Tangen, Rachel Searston, Ruben Laukkonen, Gianni Ribeiro, Jeremy Nash, and Ryan Metcalfe. Learn more at think101.org.

67 MIN2016 OCT 6
Comments
Episode 10: Simplicity

Episode 9: Logic and Wisdom

Many experiments have demonstrated differences between people who grew up in the Eastern vs Western cultures on a variety of perceptual and cognitive tasks. Is an “object-centric” perspective more useful than a “situation-centric” perspective? Logic and the scientific method grew out of this object-centric approach, and they're pretty useful. There's some real value in treating objects and events abstractly, so we can better appreciate how they operate. But in many of our everyday decisions, we don't need to generate a label to successfully navigate the world, and recognising the context of an argument is clearly important for opinion change. Is dialectical reasoning more like conscious or unconscious processing? How does the notion of “wisdom” relate to these two perspectives?Reading: Mindware by Richard Nisbett, “Logic” and “Dialectical Reasoning.” Guests: Jason Tangen, Rachel Searston, Ruben Laukkonen, Gianni Ribeiro, Jeremy Nash, and Ryan Metcalfe. Learn more at think1...

52 MIN2016 OCT 4
Comments
Episode 9: Logic and Wisdom

Latest Episodes

Episode 11: Epistemic Modesty

In the final chapter of “Mindware,” Nisbett assures the reader that we’re smarter than we were before started the book, and that we’ll now recognise mistakes in the wild. Are you, dear listener, less likely to make the errors in thinking that we’ve been discussing here? When are you likely to make mistakes? When should you rely on other people’s judgements about a domain? There seems to be an element of politeness when interacting with people who make claims, but is it wrong to, say, ask your doctor how often a diagnosis is wrong? Being sceptical about your own claims and expertise seems to be important in making everyday decisions, so how can we develop this epistemic modesty? Does knowing about experimental methodology help you make better decisions? Does is make you more sceptical? Wouldn’t it be nice if everyone asked to see the evidence before important policy decisions were made? How about an Open Science Framework for public policy? Reading: Mindware by Richard Nisbett...

79 MIN2016 OCT 20
Comments
Episode 11: Epistemic Modesty

Episode 10: Simplicity

If a major goal in science is to “Keep It Simple,” what exactly does “simple” mean in this context? Helpful? Useful? Easy to Understand? Should public money only be spent on research that can be explained to folks down at the local pub? Does simplification naturally lead to overgeneralisation? Should the media “keep it simple” when communicating scientific results to the public? The curse of knowledge is clearly operating here. How much does the average person actually know (or need to know) about seemingly simple everyday objects like a zipper, lock, or toilet? What about cognitive explanations about “simple” species like bees, fish, or birds? Are simple explanations ideal in the judgements and decisions that we make everyday?Reading: Mindware by Richard Nisbett, “KISS and Tell.”Guests: Jason Tangen, Rachel Searston, Ruben Laukkonen, Gianni Ribeiro, Jeremy Nash, and Ryan Metcalfe. Learn more at think101.org.

67 MIN2016 OCT 6
Comments
Episode 10: Simplicity

Episode 9: Logic and Wisdom

Many experiments have demonstrated differences between people who grew up in the Eastern vs Western cultures on a variety of perceptual and cognitive tasks. Is an “object-centric” perspective more useful than a “situation-centric” perspective? Logic and the scientific method grew out of this object-centric approach, and they're pretty useful. There's some real value in treating objects and events abstractly, so we can better appreciate how they operate. But in many of our everyday decisions, we don't need to generate a label to successfully navigate the world, and recognising the context of an argument is clearly important for opinion change. Is dialectical reasoning more like conscious or unconscious processing? How does the notion of “wisdom” relate to these two perspectives?Reading: Mindware by Richard Nisbett, “Logic” and “Dialectical Reasoning.” Guests: Jason Tangen, Rachel Searston, Ruben Laukkonen, Gianni Ribeiro, Jeremy Nash, and Ryan Metcalfe. Learn more at think1...

52 MIN2016 OCT 4
Comments
Episode 9: Logic and Wisdom

Listen Now On Himalaya