title

New Books in Journalism

Marshall Poe

31
Followers
9
Plays
New Books in Journalism
New Books in Journalism

New Books in Journalism

Marshall Poe

31
Followers
9
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

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About Us

Interview with Scholars of Journalism about their New Books

Latest Episodes

Anastasia Denisova, "Internet Memes and Society: Social, Cultural, and Political Contexts" (Routledge, 2019)

How have memes changed politics? In Internet Memes and Society: Social, Cultural, and Political Contexts(Routledge, 2019), Anastasia Denisova, a lecturer in journalism at the University of Westminster, gives both a history of internet memes as well as an analysis of key case studies of their impact on politics and society. Offering a rich and detailed engagement with Russian and American politics, as well as a nuanced and even-handed assessment of specific and well-known memes. In the current complex political moment the book is essential reading across the humanities and social sciences, as well as for anyone seeking to understand how the internet may shape forthcoming elections. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

34 MINSEP 20
Comments
Anastasia Denisova, "Internet Memes and Society: Social, Cultural, and Political Contexts" (Routledge, 2019)

Thomas Aiello, "The Grapevine of the Black South" (U Georgia Press, 2018)

In the summer of 1928, William Alexander Scott began a small four-page weekly with the help of his brother Cornelius. By 1932 the Atlanta World had become a daily paper and the basis of Scott's vision for a massive Southern newspaper chain - the Southern Newspaper Syndicate, later renamed as the Scott Newspaper Syndicate. At its peak, more than 240 papers were associated with the Syndicate, making it one of the largest black press institutions in the country. However, the extent of the Syndicate's reach and its centrality to Black southern life has remained largely overlooked. In The Grapevine of the Black South: The Scott Newspaper Syndicate in the Generation before the Civil Rights Movement (University of Georgia Press, 2018), Thomas Aiello offers the first critical history of this influential newspaper syndicate, tracing its roots in the early 1930s through to its eventual dissolution in the 1950s. During this critically important period preceding the the "civil rights era" usher...

62 MINSEP 19
Comments
Thomas Aiello, "The Grapevine of the Black South" (U Georgia Press, 2018)

Vincent DiGirolamo, "Crying the News: A History of America’s Newsboys" (Oxford UP, 2019)

Crying the News: A History of America’s Newsboys (Oxford University Press, 2019) looks at the legion of children and teenagers who sold newspapers on city streets, moving trains, and even Civil War battlefields in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Author Vincent DiGirolamo, a history professor at Baruch College, is featured in this New Books Network/Gotham Center for New York City History podcast interview with Beth Harpaz, editor of the City University of New York website SUM. A major theme of the book is the way in which the newspaper industry successfully fought efforts to ban newsboys as child labor. Instead, newspapers promoted newsboys as grand examples of the American dream, overcoming poverty through hard work on the road to success. Indeed, many famous Americans got their start as newsboys, from Thomas Edison to Walt Disney. But that may have been more an indication of the job’s ubiquity rather than its efficacy: "It was one of the most common, if not the most common, ch...

29 MINSEP 4
Comments
Vincent DiGirolamo, "Crying the News: A History of America’s Newsboys" (Oxford UP, 2019)

Joseph M. Adelman, "Revolutionary Networks: The Business and Politics of Printing the News, 1763-1789" (Johns Hopkins UP, 2019)

During the American Revolution, printed material, including newspapers, pamphlets, almanacs, and broadsides, played a crucial role as a forum for public debate. In Revolutionary Networks: The Business and Politics of Printing the News, 1763-1789 (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2019), Joseph M. Adelman, Associate Professor of History at Framingham State University, argues that printers—artisans who mingled with the elite but labored in a manual trade—used their commercial and political connections to directly shape Revolutionary political ideology and mass mobilization. Going into the printing offices of colonial America to explore how these documents were produced, Adelman shows how printers balanced their own political beliefs and interests alongside the commercial interests of their businesses, the customs of the printing trade, and the prevailing mood of their communities. Adelman describes how these laborers repackaged oral and manuscript compositions into printed works throu...

59 MINAUG 23
Comments
Joseph M. Adelman, "Revolutionary Networks: The Business and Politics of Printing the News, 1763-1789" (Johns Hopkins UP, 2019)

Anne O’Brien, "Women, Inequality and Media Work" (Routledge, 2019)

How do women experience gender inequality in film and television production industries? In Women, Inequality and Media Work (Routledge, 2019), Dr Anne O’Brien, lecturer in the Department of Media Studies at Maynooth University, answers this question with a case study of the Irish media industry. Blending a critical engagement with feminist and media theory with a wealth of empirical material, the book looks at the barriers to women in media occupations. The book highlights the subjectivities within media industries that resist and are responsible for these inequalities, ultimately demanding change in both Irish and Global modes of media production. The book is an important and essential read across a range of academic readers, and for anyone interested in why we have the media we have, and how we can change it. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

43 MINAUG 2
Comments
Anne O’Brien, "Women, Inequality and Media Work" (Routledge, 2019)

Gregory Borchard, "A Narrative History of the American Press" (Routledge, 2018)

The American press is older than the United States itself. Ever since its catalytic role in the American Revolution, journalism has evolved to meet changing political, economic, and technological demands. Gregory Borchard traces this history in A Narrative History of the American Press (Routledge, 2018). He calls for a better understanding of journalism's past, at a time of acute concern about its future. Borchard is a professor at the Hank Greenspun School of Journalism and Media Studies at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. He is the editor of Journalism History, a quarterly scholarly journal. Nathan Bierma is a writer, instructional designer, and voiceover talent in Grand Rapids, Michigan. His website is www.nathanbierma.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

53 MINJUL 18
Comments
Gregory Borchard, "A Narrative History of the American Press" (Routledge, 2018)

Morgan Marietta, "One Nation, Two Realities: Dueling Facts in American Democracy" (Oxford UP, 2019)

American society is deeply divided at this moment—not just on values and opinions but on basic perceptions of reality. In their latest book, One Nation, Two Realities: Dueling Facts in American Democracy (Oxford University Press, 2019), Morgan Marietta and David Barker attribute such division to the natural human tendency towards having different versions of reality. They introduce the concept of ‘dueling fact perceptions’ based on years of research, and for our interview, Morgan Marietta explains how they arrived at such conclusions and their implications for our country’s future. We have a sobering conversation about how fact-checking and greater education will not fix the problem of dueling fact perceptions, and we address the importance of trust—in our politicians, media, and other information sources—can ultimately shape how we use information to advance our beliefs. This interview is essential for those seeking to making sense of our current political climate and will pr...

47 MINJUN 26
Comments
Morgan Marietta, "One Nation, Two Realities: Dueling Facts in American Democracy" (Oxford UP, 2019)

Amos Mac and Rocco Kayiatos, "Original Plumbing: The Best of Ten Years of Trans Male Culture" (Amethyst Editions, 2019)

When Amos Mac and Rocco Kayiatos first launch Original Plumbing in 2009, they created a magazine the world desperately needed: a creative and celebratory biannual publication about trans men, by trans men. For ten years, OP was an inspired response to the lack of meaningful representation of trans lives and culture. Each issue was filled with gorgeous, moving, hilarious, and sexy narratives that pushed back against marginalizing stereotypes. Taken together, these stories met mainstream media’s violence with self-love, dismissal with determination, and repression with resistance. Collecting the best of the magazine’s entire twenty-issue run, Original Plumbing: The Best Ten Years of Trans Male Culture (Amethyst Editions, 2019) is a remarkable full-color archive that includes interviews with trailblazers like Janet Mock and Silas Howard; cutting-edge artwork and photography; mediations on love, relationships, and family; political essays and personal reflections; and much, much more....

54 MINJUN 25
Comments
Amos Mac and Rocco Kayiatos, "Original Plumbing: The Best of Ten Years of Trans Male Culture" (Amethyst Editions, 2019)

Jeremy Black, "The English Press: A History" (Bloomsbury, 2019)

In this succinct and brilliantly written one-volume account of the rise and fall of the English press, premier historian Jeremy Black, the most prolific historian writing in the Anglophone world, if not on the entire planet, traces the English press’s history from the 17th century to the Internet age. The English Press: A History (Bloomsbury, 2019) focuses on the major developments in the world of print journalism and sets the history of the press in wider currents of English history, political, social, economic and technological. Black takes the reader through a chronological sequence of chapters, with a final chapter exploring possible scenarios for the future of English press. He investigates whether we are witnessing the demise of, or simply a crisis of the English press in the aftermath of the News of the World scandal and Levinson Inquiry. A new title by one of the most eminent historians of Britain and a leading expert on the history of the press, The English Press will appe...

62 MINJUN 13
Comments
Jeremy Black, "The English Press: A History" (Bloomsbury, 2019)

Matt Guardino, "Framing Inequality: News Media, Public Opinion, and the Neoliberal Turn in US Public Policy" (Oxford UP, 2019)

Neoliberal policies have been a primary feature of American political economy for decades. In Framing Inequality: News Media, Public Opinion, and the Neoliberal Turn in US Public Policy (Oxford University Press, 2019), Matt Guardino focuses on the power of corporate news media in shaping how the public understands the key policy debates during this period. Based on a range of evidence from the Reagan Revolution into the Trump administration, he explains how profit pressures in the media have narrowed and trivialized news coverage and influenced public attitudes in the process. Guardino is associate professor of political science at Providence College. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

27 MINJUN 6
Comments
Matt Guardino, "Framing Inequality: News Media, Public Opinion, and the Neoliberal Turn in US Public Policy" (Oxford UP, 2019)

Latest Episodes

Anastasia Denisova, "Internet Memes and Society: Social, Cultural, and Political Contexts" (Routledge, 2019)

How have memes changed politics? In Internet Memes and Society: Social, Cultural, and Political Contexts(Routledge, 2019), Anastasia Denisova, a lecturer in journalism at the University of Westminster, gives both a history of internet memes as well as an analysis of key case studies of their impact on politics and society. Offering a rich and detailed engagement with Russian and American politics, as well as a nuanced and even-handed assessment of specific and well-known memes. In the current complex political moment the book is essential reading across the humanities and social sciences, as well as for anyone seeking to understand how the internet may shape forthcoming elections. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

34 MINSEP 20
Comments
Anastasia Denisova, "Internet Memes and Society: Social, Cultural, and Political Contexts" (Routledge, 2019)

Thomas Aiello, "The Grapevine of the Black South" (U Georgia Press, 2018)

In the summer of 1928, William Alexander Scott began a small four-page weekly with the help of his brother Cornelius. By 1932 the Atlanta World had become a daily paper and the basis of Scott's vision for a massive Southern newspaper chain - the Southern Newspaper Syndicate, later renamed as the Scott Newspaper Syndicate. At its peak, more than 240 papers were associated with the Syndicate, making it one of the largest black press institutions in the country. However, the extent of the Syndicate's reach and its centrality to Black southern life has remained largely overlooked. In The Grapevine of the Black South: The Scott Newspaper Syndicate in the Generation before the Civil Rights Movement (University of Georgia Press, 2018), Thomas Aiello offers the first critical history of this influential newspaper syndicate, tracing its roots in the early 1930s through to its eventual dissolution in the 1950s. During this critically important period preceding the the "civil rights era" usher...

62 MINSEP 19
Comments
Thomas Aiello, "The Grapevine of the Black South" (U Georgia Press, 2018)

Vincent DiGirolamo, "Crying the News: A History of America’s Newsboys" (Oxford UP, 2019)

Crying the News: A History of America’s Newsboys (Oxford University Press, 2019) looks at the legion of children and teenagers who sold newspapers on city streets, moving trains, and even Civil War battlefields in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Author Vincent DiGirolamo, a history professor at Baruch College, is featured in this New Books Network/Gotham Center for New York City History podcast interview with Beth Harpaz, editor of the City University of New York website SUM. A major theme of the book is the way in which the newspaper industry successfully fought efforts to ban newsboys as child labor. Instead, newspapers promoted newsboys as grand examples of the American dream, overcoming poverty through hard work on the road to success. Indeed, many famous Americans got their start as newsboys, from Thomas Edison to Walt Disney. But that may have been more an indication of the job’s ubiquity rather than its efficacy: "It was one of the most common, if not the most common, ch...

29 MINSEP 4
Comments
Vincent DiGirolamo, "Crying the News: A History of America’s Newsboys" (Oxford UP, 2019)

Joseph M. Adelman, "Revolutionary Networks: The Business and Politics of Printing the News, 1763-1789" (Johns Hopkins UP, 2019)

During the American Revolution, printed material, including newspapers, pamphlets, almanacs, and broadsides, played a crucial role as a forum for public debate. In Revolutionary Networks: The Business and Politics of Printing the News, 1763-1789 (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2019), Joseph M. Adelman, Associate Professor of History at Framingham State University, argues that printers—artisans who mingled with the elite but labored in a manual trade—used their commercial and political connections to directly shape Revolutionary political ideology and mass mobilization. Going into the printing offices of colonial America to explore how these documents were produced, Adelman shows how printers balanced their own political beliefs and interests alongside the commercial interests of their businesses, the customs of the printing trade, and the prevailing mood of their communities. Adelman describes how these laborers repackaged oral and manuscript compositions into printed works throu...

59 MINAUG 23
Comments
Joseph M. Adelman, "Revolutionary Networks: The Business and Politics of Printing the News, 1763-1789" (Johns Hopkins UP, 2019)

Anne O’Brien, "Women, Inequality and Media Work" (Routledge, 2019)

How do women experience gender inequality in film and television production industries? In Women, Inequality and Media Work (Routledge, 2019), Dr Anne O’Brien, lecturer in the Department of Media Studies at Maynooth University, answers this question with a case study of the Irish media industry. Blending a critical engagement with feminist and media theory with a wealth of empirical material, the book looks at the barriers to women in media occupations. The book highlights the subjectivities within media industries that resist and are responsible for these inequalities, ultimately demanding change in both Irish and Global modes of media production. The book is an important and essential read across a range of academic readers, and for anyone interested in why we have the media we have, and how we can change it. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

43 MINAUG 2
Comments
Anne O’Brien, "Women, Inequality and Media Work" (Routledge, 2019)

Gregory Borchard, "A Narrative History of the American Press" (Routledge, 2018)

The American press is older than the United States itself. Ever since its catalytic role in the American Revolution, journalism has evolved to meet changing political, economic, and technological demands. Gregory Borchard traces this history in A Narrative History of the American Press (Routledge, 2018). He calls for a better understanding of journalism's past, at a time of acute concern about its future. Borchard is a professor at the Hank Greenspun School of Journalism and Media Studies at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. He is the editor of Journalism History, a quarterly scholarly journal. Nathan Bierma is a writer, instructional designer, and voiceover talent in Grand Rapids, Michigan. His website is www.nathanbierma.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

53 MINJUL 18
Comments
Gregory Borchard, "A Narrative History of the American Press" (Routledge, 2018)

Morgan Marietta, "One Nation, Two Realities: Dueling Facts in American Democracy" (Oxford UP, 2019)

American society is deeply divided at this moment—not just on values and opinions but on basic perceptions of reality. In their latest book, One Nation, Two Realities: Dueling Facts in American Democracy (Oxford University Press, 2019), Morgan Marietta and David Barker attribute such division to the natural human tendency towards having different versions of reality. They introduce the concept of ‘dueling fact perceptions’ based on years of research, and for our interview, Morgan Marietta explains how they arrived at such conclusions and their implications for our country’s future. We have a sobering conversation about how fact-checking and greater education will not fix the problem of dueling fact perceptions, and we address the importance of trust—in our politicians, media, and other information sources—can ultimately shape how we use information to advance our beliefs. This interview is essential for those seeking to making sense of our current political climate and will pr...

47 MINJUN 26
Comments
Morgan Marietta, "One Nation, Two Realities: Dueling Facts in American Democracy" (Oxford UP, 2019)

Amos Mac and Rocco Kayiatos, "Original Plumbing: The Best of Ten Years of Trans Male Culture" (Amethyst Editions, 2019)

When Amos Mac and Rocco Kayiatos first launch Original Plumbing in 2009, they created a magazine the world desperately needed: a creative and celebratory biannual publication about trans men, by trans men. For ten years, OP was an inspired response to the lack of meaningful representation of trans lives and culture. Each issue was filled with gorgeous, moving, hilarious, and sexy narratives that pushed back against marginalizing stereotypes. Taken together, these stories met mainstream media’s violence with self-love, dismissal with determination, and repression with resistance. Collecting the best of the magazine’s entire twenty-issue run, Original Plumbing: The Best Ten Years of Trans Male Culture (Amethyst Editions, 2019) is a remarkable full-color archive that includes interviews with trailblazers like Janet Mock and Silas Howard; cutting-edge artwork and photography; mediations on love, relationships, and family; political essays and personal reflections; and much, much more....

54 MINJUN 25
Comments
Amos Mac and Rocco Kayiatos, "Original Plumbing: The Best of Ten Years of Trans Male Culture" (Amethyst Editions, 2019)

Jeremy Black, "The English Press: A History" (Bloomsbury, 2019)

In this succinct and brilliantly written one-volume account of the rise and fall of the English press, premier historian Jeremy Black, the most prolific historian writing in the Anglophone world, if not on the entire planet, traces the English press’s history from the 17th century to the Internet age. The English Press: A History (Bloomsbury, 2019) focuses on the major developments in the world of print journalism and sets the history of the press in wider currents of English history, political, social, economic and technological. Black takes the reader through a chronological sequence of chapters, with a final chapter exploring possible scenarios for the future of English press. He investigates whether we are witnessing the demise of, or simply a crisis of the English press in the aftermath of the News of the World scandal and Levinson Inquiry. A new title by one of the most eminent historians of Britain and a leading expert on the history of the press, The English Press will appe...

62 MINJUN 13
Comments
Jeremy Black, "The English Press: A History" (Bloomsbury, 2019)

Matt Guardino, "Framing Inequality: News Media, Public Opinion, and the Neoliberal Turn in US Public Policy" (Oxford UP, 2019)

Neoliberal policies have been a primary feature of American political economy for decades. In Framing Inequality: News Media, Public Opinion, and the Neoliberal Turn in US Public Policy (Oxford University Press, 2019), Matt Guardino focuses on the power of corporate news media in shaping how the public understands the key policy debates during this period. Based on a range of evidence from the Reagan Revolution into the Trump administration, he explains how profit pressures in the media have narrowed and trivialized news coverage and influenced public attitudes in the process. Guardino is associate professor of political science at Providence College. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

27 MINJUN 6
Comments
Matt Guardino, "Framing Inequality: News Media, Public Opinion, and the Neoliberal Turn in US Public Policy" (Oxford UP, 2019)