title

Chinese Literature Podcast

Rob and Lee Moore

10
Followers
34
Plays
Chinese Literature Podcast
Chinese Literature Podcast

Chinese Literature Podcast

Rob and Lee Moore

10
Followers
34
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

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About Us

a podcast five thousand years in the making...

Latest Episodes

Ren the Filial Son

The Fourth in our series on Toxic Masculinity, this is the story of a man whose wife is sleeping around, a man who is not doing a good job of taking care of his father, a man who, at least in a pre-modern Chinese context, is not a man at all. Upon learning that his […]

-1 s1 w ago
Comments
Ren the Filial Son

Jin Ping Mei, Plum in the Golden Vase

Today, in our third podcast in our series on toxic masculinity in Chinese literature, we examine Jin Ping Mei, the most important work of pornography in Chinese fiction. The novel is 100 chapters long, and it is dirty…the title itself refers to an event which is too dirty to discuss too much, but use your […]

-1 sSEP 12
Comments
Jin Ping Mei, Plum in the Golden Vase

The Water Margin

The Water Margin, or the 水浒传 (shui hu zhuan) is one of the novels from the Ming Dynasty that we can point to as the origin of much of the Kung Fu tradition. It is the story of 108 dudes (I’m being technical here). They live outside of the boundaries of the urban Chinese world, […]

-1 sAUG 9
Comments
The Water Margin

Classical Chinese Pornographic Literature

Today Brandon joins Rob and Lee for one of the weirdest stories that they have ever done. The “Biography of Lord As-You-Like-It” 如意君傳 is a work of Ming Dynasty pornographic literature that discusses the only Empress to ever rule China, the Tang empress Wu Zetian. In this pornographic work, the idea of feminine rulership is […]

-1 sJUL 18
Comments
Classical Chinese Pornographic Literature

The Tiananmen Square Massacre and Chinese Rock

We are posting this podcast on June 4th, 2019, the 30th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square Massacre. We have decided to focus on a song (which is just a poem after all) that was performed for the protesters in the Square and that became the anthem for the movement that, thirty years ago, briefly lit […]

-1 sJUN 3
Comments
The Tiananmen Square Massacre and Chinese Rock

The May 4th Movement

Modern Chinese Literature begins with the May 4th Movement. Well, that’s according to the orthodox understanding of Chinese literature promoted by the CCP in China. Either way, May 4th, 1919 was a turning point both in Chinese society and in Chinese literature. It was during and after this date that Lu Xun wrote some of […]

19 MINMAY 3
Comments
The May 4th Movement

Laozi

This work of Daoism is one of the most translated books in the world. But what is it really about? Rob and Lee explore the Laozi (he probably was not a real person, so we call him the Laozi or the Lao tze) and a passage from his Dao De Jing.

17 MINAPR 11
Comments
Laozi

Huainanzi – Old Man on the Border Loses His Horse

This podcast we take a look at a story from a strange Daoist classic, the Huainanzi 淮南子. The tale is called Old Man on the Border Loses his Horse 塞翁失馬. The story title is, itself a chengyu, that means something like you never know if something that seems unfortunate is actually fortunate. Here is the […]

17 MINMAR 15
Comments
Huainanzi – Old Man on the Border Loses His Horse

Dumptruck Poetry – Lei Feng

Today, we look at one of the most popular writers during socialist China (1949-1976). His name is Lei Feng. He wrote poetry about dump trucks, but he was killed when a dump truck backed up into a telephone pole which came crashing down on him. As they were cleaning up the deceased earthly possessions, they […]

24 MINFEB 14
Comments
Dumptruck Poetry – Lei Feng

Li Shangyin – Goodbye Poem

Today, Rob and Lee say goodbye, or, at least, say goodbye to the face to face format of podcasting. Rob has earned a Chateaubriand Scholarship to the Sorbonne in Paris, where he will be researching the nexus of Chinese and French culture in the late Qing. That means Lee and Rob may have to change […]

14 MINJAN 15
Comments
Li Shangyin – Goodbye Poem
the END

Latest Episodes

Ren the Filial Son

The Fourth in our series on Toxic Masculinity, this is the story of a man whose wife is sleeping around, a man who is not doing a good job of taking care of his father, a man who, at least in a pre-modern Chinese context, is not a man at all. Upon learning that his […]

-1 s1 w ago
Comments
Ren the Filial Son

Jin Ping Mei, Plum in the Golden Vase

Today, in our third podcast in our series on toxic masculinity in Chinese literature, we examine Jin Ping Mei, the most important work of pornography in Chinese fiction. The novel is 100 chapters long, and it is dirty…the title itself refers to an event which is too dirty to discuss too much, but use your […]

-1 sSEP 12
Comments
Jin Ping Mei, Plum in the Golden Vase

The Water Margin

The Water Margin, or the 水浒传 (shui hu zhuan) is one of the novels from the Ming Dynasty that we can point to as the origin of much of the Kung Fu tradition. It is the story of 108 dudes (I’m being technical here). They live outside of the boundaries of the urban Chinese world, […]

-1 sAUG 9
Comments
The Water Margin

Classical Chinese Pornographic Literature

Today Brandon joins Rob and Lee for one of the weirdest stories that they have ever done. The “Biography of Lord As-You-Like-It” 如意君傳 is a work of Ming Dynasty pornographic literature that discusses the only Empress to ever rule China, the Tang empress Wu Zetian. In this pornographic work, the idea of feminine rulership is […]

-1 sJUL 18
Comments
Classical Chinese Pornographic Literature

The Tiananmen Square Massacre and Chinese Rock

We are posting this podcast on June 4th, 2019, the 30th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square Massacre. We have decided to focus on a song (which is just a poem after all) that was performed for the protesters in the Square and that became the anthem for the movement that, thirty years ago, briefly lit […]

-1 sJUN 3
Comments
The Tiananmen Square Massacre and Chinese Rock

The May 4th Movement

Modern Chinese Literature begins with the May 4th Movement. Well, that’s according to the orthodox understanding of Chinese literature promoted by the CCP in China. Either way, May 4th, 1919 was a turning point both in Chinese society and in Chinese literature. It was during and after this date that Lu Xun wrote some of […]

19 MINMAY 3
Comments
The May 4th Movement

Laozi

This work of Daoism is one of the most translated books in the world. But what is it really about? Rob and Lee explore the Laozi (he probably was not a real person, so we call him the Laozi or the Lao tze) and a passage from his Dao De Jing.

17 MINAPR 11
Comments
Laozi

Huainanzi – Old Man on the Border Loses His Horse

This podcast we take a look at a story from a strange Daoist classic, the Huainanzi 淮南子. The tale is called Old Man on the Border Loses his Horse 塞翁失馬. The story title is, itself a chengyu, that means something like you never know if something that seems unfortunate is actually fortunate. Here is the […]

17 MINMAR 15
Comments
Huainanzi – Old Man on the Border Loses His Horse

Dumptruck Poetry – Lei Feng

Today, we look at one of the most popular writers during socialist China (1949-1976). His name is Lei Feng. He wrote poetry about dump trucks, but he was killed when a dump truck backed up into a telephone pole which came crashing down on him. As they were cleaning up the deceased earthly possessions, they […]

24 MINFEB 14
Comments
Dumptruck Poetry – Lei Feng

Li Shangyin – Goodbye Poem

Today, Rob and Lee say goodbye, or, at least, say goodbye to the face to face format of podcasting. Rob has earned a Chateaubriand Scholarship to the Sorbonne in Paris, where he will be researching the nexus of Chinese and French culture in the late Qing. That means Lee and Rob may have to change […]

14 MINJAN 15
Comments
Li Shangyin – Goodbye Poem
the END
hmly
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