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City Journal's 10 Blocks

Manhattan Institute

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Followers
106
Plays
City Journal's 10 Blocks

City Journal's 10 Blocks

Manhattan Institute

20
Followers
106
Plays
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About Us

City Journal's 10 Blocks, a weekly podcast hosted by editor Brian C. Anderson, features discussions on urban policy and culture with City Journal editors, contributors, and special guests. Forthcoming episodes will be devoted to topics such as: predictive policing, the Bronx renaissance, reform of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, homelessness in Portland, Oregon, and more. City Journal is a quarterly print and regular online magazine published by the Manhattan Institute.

Latest Episodes

Why Ban Dollar Stores?

Steven MalangajoinsSeth Barronto discuss efforts to restrict dollar stores in cities across the country—the subject of Malanga’s popular story forCity Journal, “Unjust Deserts.” For nearly 20 years, “food deserts”—neighborhoods without supermarkets—have captured the attention of public officials, activists, and the media, who often blame the situation on dollar-discount stores in these areas. These stores, it’s claimed, drive out supermarkets with their low prices and saturate poor neighborhoods with junk food. But are dollar stores really to blame for bad diets?

17 MIN4 d ago
Comments
Why Ban Dollar Stores?

Rent Control: Unjust and Ineffective

Manhattan Institute's Michael Hendrixinterviews Mayer Brown partner Andrew Pincus, the lead attorney in a lawsuit taking on New York State’s sweeping rent-regulation laws. In 2019, New York strengthened its already-strict rent regulations, while state legislatures in Oregon and California approved caps on rent increases. Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Senator Bernie Sanders have even proposed national rent-control policies. Pincus explains what's wrong with rent control, from violating due process and property rights to shutting out newcomers attempting to find housing in cities. If you're interested in learning more about rent control, check out a new report by Michael Hendrix from Manhattan Institute'sIssues 2020 series.

28 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Rent Control: Unjust and Ineffective

Child Welfare in Crisis

Naomi Schaefer RileyjoinsCity JournaleditorBrian Andersonto discuss the state of the American child-welfare services, and describes and what some nonprofits are doing to improve foster care across the country. Nationally, RileynotesinCity Journal,about 444,000 children are in foster-care. And in many states, "officials report a severe shortage of families to take in these children." On top of that, disturbing incidentslike the death of Zymere Perkins in New York highlight the failure of local child-welfare services to intervene in the face of clear evidence of abuse.

15 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Child Welfare in Crisis

Season’s Greetings and a Brief Holiday Update

Merry Christmas from the editors ofCity Journal. In another special episode of 10 Blocks, editorBrian Andersonextends his best wishes to all our listeners during the holiday season, reflects on a year of terrific guests, and more. If you're interested in supporting the Manhattan Institute and City Journal, please visit our website.

4 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Season’s Greetings and a Brief Holiday Update

Faith, Family, and Personal Sacrifice

In a special holiday edition of 10 Blocks, Timothy Goeglein joinsCity Journalassistant editor Charles McElwee to discuss how people of faith can help renew American society—themes explored in his new book,American Restoration: How Faith, Family, and Personal Sacrifice Can Heal Our Nation. Coauthored with Craig Osten,American Restorationcalls for a revival of spiritual values in America and offers a roadmap for people of faith to engage with our modern culture—especially at the local level. Timothy Goeglein is Vice President of External Relations forFocus on the Family. Formerly, he served as a special assistant to President George W. Bush and as a deputy director of the White House Office of Public Liaison.

33 MIN2019 DEC 18
Comments
Faith, Family, and Personal Sacrifice

The Great Society, Reconsidered

Amity Shlaesdiscusses the economic history of the 1960s and the efforts of Presidents Johnson and Nixon to eradicate poverty—the subjects of her just-published book,Great Society: A New History. The 1960s were a momentous period, from the Civil Rights Movement to the Vietnam War, but Shlaes's book focuses on the incredibly ambitious government programs of the era, which expanded the social safety net beyond anything contemplated before. Overall, the Great Society programs, Shlaes writes, came "close enough to socialism to cause economic tragedy." Great Societyis a powerful follow-up to her earlier book,The Forgotten Man, about the Great Depression and the 1930s.

22 MIN2019 DEC 11
Comments
The Great Society, Reconsidered

Bloomberg’s Complicated Legacy

Seth Barron talks with four City Journal contributors—Rafael Mangual, Eric Kober, Ray Domanico, and Steven Malanga—about former New York City mayor and now presidential hopeful Michael Bloomberg's record on crime, education, economic development, and more. After years of teasing a presidential run, Bloomberg has entered the race for the 2020 Democratic nomination. Just a week before his official announcement, he made headlines by reversing his long-standing support of controversial policing practices in New York—commonly known as "stop and frisk." Bloomberg's record on crime will factor heavily in his campaign, but his 12 years as mayor were eventful in numerous other policy areas.

51 MIN2019 DEC 4
Comments
Bloomberg’s Complicated Legacy

Building Civil Society: A Conversation

Howard Husock interviews four remarkable leaders of nonprofit groups who were recently honored as part of Manhattan Institute's Civil Society Awards andCivil Society Fellows Program. Manhattan Institute andCity Journalhave long sought to support and encourage civil-society organizations and leaders who, with the help of volunteers and private philanthropy, do so much to help communities address serious social problems. In this edition of the 10 Blocks podcast, Husock speaks with: Luma Mufleh(2:00) is the founder and CEO ofFugees Family, an award-winning, national nonprofit organization and independent school network with a customized academic approach for refugee children. Mufleh is a2019 Civil Society Fellow. Reid Porter(18:25) is the founder and president ofAct, Advocates for Community Transformation, a group which takes an innovative approach to creating safer neighborhoods in Dallas. Porter is a2019 Civil Society Fellow. Megan Rose(35:00) is the CEO ofBetter Together, an organiz...

70 MIN2019 NOV 27
Comments
Building Civil Society: A Conversation

A Model for Suburban Development?

Charles MarohnjoinsMichael Hendrix to discuss why the current approach to suburban development isn't working—the subject of his new book, Strong Towns: A Bottom-Up Revolution to Rebuild American Prosperity. "Strong Towns," notes Aaron Rennin hisreviewof the book forCity Journal, "resulted from [Marohn's] discovery that the highway projects he designed showed a negative return on investment." Marohn has dedicated his career to helping the country's older suburbs avoid such costly mistakes by founding the book's namesake organization, Strong Towns. "Whether or not one agrees with his many observations and prescriptions," Renn writes, "Marohn provides a valuable analysis of sprawl-based development."

25 MIN2019 NOV 19
Comments
A Model for Suburban Development?

One Trade School’s Path to Success

Kay S. HymowitzjoinsCity JournaleditorBrian Andersonto discuss Pennsylvania’s Williamson College of the Trades, a three-year school for young men offering a debt-free path to high-paying work—and the life skills to help them get there. “Trade schools” have long had a stigma in American culture, but Williamson is no ordinary trade school: students wake up early to the sound of reveille and attend academic classes in coats and ties. As HymowitzwritesinCity Journal’sautumn issue, “With its old-timey rituals, rigorous scheduling, and immersive culture, Williamson has a military-school feel.” But according to the students she interviewed, the prospect of a good-paying career makes the strict rules more than worth it.

18 MIN2019 NOV 13
Comments
One Trade School’s Path to Success

Latest Episodes

Why Ban Dollar Stores?

Steven MalangajoinsSeth Barronto discuss efforts to restrict dollar stores in cities across the country—the subject of Malanga’s popular story forCity Journal, “Unjust Deserts.” For nearly 20 years, “food deserts”—neighborhoods without supermarkets—have captured the attention of public officials, activists, and the media, who often blame the situation on dollar-discount stores in these areas. These stores, it’s claimed, drive out supermarkets with their low prices and saturate poor neighborhoods with junk food. But are dollar stores really to blame for bad diets?

17 MIN4 d ago
Comments
Why Ban Dollar Stores?

Rent Control: Unjust and Ineffective

Manhattan Institute's Michael Hendrixinterviews Mayer Brown partner Andrew Pincus, the lead attorney in a lawsuit taking on New York State’s sweeping rent-regulation laws. In 2019, New York strengthened its already-strict rent regulations, while state legislatures in Oregon and California approved caps on rent increases. Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Senator Bernie Sanders have even proposed national rent-control policies. Pincus explains what's wrong with rent control, from violating due process and property rights to shutting out newcomers attempting to find housing in cities. If you're interested in learning more about rent control, check out a new report by Michael Hendrix from Manhattan Institute'sIssues 2020 series.

28 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Rent Control: Unjust and Ineffective

Child Welfare in Crisis

Naomi Schaefer RileyjoinsCity JournaleditorBrian Andersonto discuss the state of the American child-welfare services, and describes and what some nonprofits are doing to improve foster care across the country. Nationally, RileynotesinCity Journal,about 444,000 children are in foster-care. And in many states, "officials report a severe shortage of families to take in these children." On top of that, disturbing incidentslike the death of Zymere Perkins in New York highlight the failure of local child-welfare services to intervene in the face of clear evidence of abuse.

15 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Child Welfare in Crisis

Season’s Greetings and a Brief Holiday Update

Merry Christmas from the editors ofCity Journal. In another special episode of 10 Blocks, editorBrian Andersonextends his best wishes to all our listeners during the holiday season, reflects on a year of terrific guests, and more. If you're interested in supporting the Manhattan Institute and City Journal, please visit our website.

4 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Season’s Greetings and a Brief Holiday Update

Faith, Family, and Personal Sacrifice

In a special holiday edition of 10 Blocks, Timothy Goeglein joinsCity Journalassistant editor Charles McElwee to discuss how people of faith can help renew American society—themes explored in his new book,American Restoration: How Faith, Family, and Personal Sacrifice Can Heal Our Nation. Coauthored with Craig Osten,American Restorationcalls for a revival of spiritual values in America and offers a roadmap for people of faith to engage with our modern culture—especially at the local level. Timothy Goeglein is Vice President of External Relations forFocus on the Family. Formerly, he served as a special assistant to President George W. Bush and as a deputy director of the White House Office of Public Liaison.

33 MIN2019 DEC 18
Comments
Faith, Family, and Personal Sacrifice

The Great Society, Reconsidered

Amity Shlaesdiscusses the economic history of the 1960s and the efforts of Presidents Johnson and Nixon to eradicate poverty—the subjects of her just-published book,Great Society: A New History. The 1960s were a momentous period, from the Civil Rights Movement to the Vietnam War, but Shlaes's book focuses on the incredibly ambitious government programs of the era, which expanded the social safety net beyond anything contemplated before. Overall, the Great Society programs, Shlaes writes, came "close enough to socialism to cause economic tragedy." Great Societyis a powerful follow-up to her earlier book,The Forgotten Man, about the Great Depression and the 1930s.

22 MIN2019 DEC 11
Comments
The Great Society, Reconsidered

Bloomberg’s Complicated Legacy

Seth Barron talks with four City Journal contributors—Rafael Mangual, Eric Kober, Ray Domanico, and Steven Malanga—about former New York City mayor and now presidential hopeful Michael Bloomberg's record on crime, education, economic development, and more. After years of teasing a presidential run, Bloomberg has entered the race for the 2020 Democratic nomination. Just a week before his official announcement, he made headlines by reversing his long-standing support of controversial policing practices in New York—commonly known as "stop and frisk." Bloomberg's record on crime will factor heavily in his campaign, but his 12 years as mayor were eventful in numerous other policy areas.

51 MIN2019 DEC 4
Comments
Bloomberg’s Complicated Legacy

Building Civil Society: A Conversation

Howard Husock interviews four remarkable leaders of nonprofit groups who were recently honored as part of Manhattan Institute's Civil Society Awards andCivil Society Fellows Program. Manhattan Institute andCity Journalhave long sought to support and encourage civil-society organizations and leaders who, with the help of volunteers and private philanthropy, do so much to help communities address serious social problems. In this edition of the 10 Blocks podcast, Husock speaks with: Luma Mufleh(2:00) is the founder and CEO ofFugees Family, an award-winning, national nonprofit organization and independent school network with a customized academic approach for refugee children. Mufleh is a2019 Civil Society Fellow. Reid Porter(18:25) is the founder and president ofAct, Advocates for Community Transformation, a group which takes an innovative approach to creating safer neighborhoods in Dallas. Porter is a2019 Civil Society Fellow. Megan Rose(35:00) is the CEO ofBetter Together, an organiz...

70 MIN2019 NOV 27
Comments
Building Civil Society: A Conversation

A Model for Suburban Development?

Charles MarohnjoinsMichael Hendrix to discuss why the current approach to suburban development isn't working—the subject of his new book, Strong Towns: A Bottom-Up Revolution to Rebuild American Prosperity. "Strong Towns," notes Aaron Rennin hisreviewof the book forCity Journal, "resulted from [Marohn's] discovery that the highway projects he designed showed a negative return on investment." Marohn has dedicated his career to helping the country's older suburbs avoid such costly mistakes by founding the book's namesake organization, Strong Towns. "Whether or not one agrees with his many observations and prescriptions," Renn writes, "Marohn provides a valuable analysis of sprawl-based development."

25 MIN2019 NOV 19
Comments
A Model for Suburban Development?

One Trade School’s Path to Success

Kay S. HymowitzjoinsCity JournaleditorBrian Andersonto discuss Pennsylvania’s Williamson College of the Trades, a three-year school for young men offering a debt-free path to high-paying work—and the life skills to help them get there. “Trade schools” have long had a stigma in American culture, but Williamson is no ordinary trade school: students wake up early to the sound of reveille and attend academic classes in coats and ties. As HymowitzwritesinCity Journal’sautumn issue, “With its old-timey rituals, rigorous scheduling, and immersive culture, Williamson has a military-school feel.” But according to the students she interviewed, the prospect of a good-paying career makes the strict rules more than worth it.

18 MIN2019 NOV 13
Comments
One Trade School’s Path to Success

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