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Seated in Action

Ryan Sarehkhani/Andrew Cochran

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Seated in Action
Seated in Action

Seated in Action

Ryan Sarehkhani/Andrew Cochran

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About Us

As you may have noticed, we are living in divisive times. We are experiencing sociocultural change at a seemingly faster rate than any other time in recent memory, and these changes manifest in the political realm. These notions are compounded by the way we tend to interface with social media and media at large; as such, your hosts, Ryan and Andrew, have come together to advance a philosophy of pragmatism in an attempt to remedy certain toxic cultural phenomena.

Latest Episodes

Episode 23 — Can Political Violence Ever Be Justified?

Episode 22 — Can Political Violence Ever Be Justified?Disclaimer: The first half of the episode came out a bit tinny and lo-fi. We don’t know why and we aren’t sure what we did wrong, but we will attempt to change things on the backend to ensure the podcast’s quality is as high as it can be. Sorry. Please love us.In the first half of this episode, your hosts spend some time meditating on the issue of violence. Is it ever justified? Obviously, most can agree that there are instances wherein violence is completely justifiable. But, is it ever acceptable in the political realm? To answer this question, Ryan and Andrew each quote Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. as a springboard into a broader conversation about violence as political strategy. The conversation that ensues encompasses violent revolution, non-violent protest, and the subtleties of the nature of violence as a methodology for change. In the second, better produced, half of this episode, Ryan introduces yet another quotation ...

103 MIN2018 OCT 15
Comments
Episode 23 — Can Political Violence Ever Be Justified?

Episode 22 — What is Postmodernism?

Episode 22 — What is Postmodernism?In the first half of this episode, Ryan and Andrew talk about the notion that people on both sides of the aisle, but primarily those on the right, use and misuse the term “postmodernism.” This begs the question, “what is postmodernism?” Is it an epistemology? Is it a theoretical lens? Is it an ideology that, when mixed with Marxism, will bring about the downfall of the West? But, before Ryan and Andrew can answer any of these questions, they must first answer the question, “what is modernism?” Your hosts spend the first half of this episode defining and describing this term. In the second half of this episode, your hosts transition into a deeper analysis of what constitutes “postmodernism.” In doing so, they explore some of the central tenants of the movement and compare them to how the term is used colloquially. By the end of the episode, through their investigation of these deep questions, your hosts return to a basic truth about philoso...

86 MIN2018 OCT 1
Comments
Episode 22 — What is Postmodernism?

Episode 21 - Re-Calibrating the American Collegiate System

In the first half of this episode, your hosts talk about their recent appearance on Steve Zelt's podcast, "A Small Good Thing" (for more information about the podcast, visit https://www.asmallgoodthing.org/). The conversation lasted about two hours, but the content will be redacted to a trim thirty minutes. Within this conversation, your bois and Zelt grappled with the notion of what universities ought to do, though they did not do so thoroughly. So, we decided to devote an entire episode to talking about what we think the purpose of a university ought to be; in doing so, we articulate six principles upon which universities ought to based.First, we argue that colleges ought to challenge students. We do not merely imply that university coursework ought to be difficult; rather, we argue that professors ought to present controversial ideas that challenge students' fundamental suppositions about what they think they know. Secondly, we argue that in order to achieve the first goal, colle...

110 MIN2018 SEP 17
Comments
Episode 21 - Re-Calibrating the American Collegiate System

Episode 20 - SHOCKING: Seated in Action EVISCERATES Libtards and Cuckservatives!

In the first half of the episode, your hosts congratulate themselves for reaching twenty episodes and usher in the new age of "season two." They move on to apologize about the episode's title. From there, they elaborate on the emotional responses that lie beneath the prevalence of clickbait and other such annoying internet attention grabbers. In the second half, Ryan and Andrew discuss how clickbait titles work to create a less informed audience before moving on to some advice that just might fix the internet if enough people get behind it.You can reach out to Seated in Action by email us at seatedinaction@gmail.com Be sure to subscribe to our podcast, check out our website at www.seatedinaction.com, stayed tune for our next episode, and leave us a (preferably favorable!) review on your podcast app of choice.LINKS:Music Notes:“As Colourful as Ever” by Broke for Free: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Broke_For_Free/Layers/As_Colorful_As_EverArticles:“One Amazing Reason Clickbait ...

105 MIN2018 SEP 10
Comments
Episode 20 - SHOCKING: Seated in Action EVISCERATES Libtards and Cuckservatives!

Bonus Episode 2: State of the Podcast & Our First Giveaway

At first, your mindful, forward-thinking hosts wanted to make a state of the union podcast for the 20th episode, but then we realized that we already technically released a 20th episode; so, before releasing the actual 20th episode, we're releasing a state of the podcast episode (as, technically, our 22nd episode...). Are we illogical? We like to think not. Is our podcast scheduling odd? Maybe a little. Is this arbitrary? Absolutely, but you've stuck with us thus far and we really wanted to take the time to talk about our first four months in the podcasting world. In this episode, we talk about things we've done poorly, things we've done well, potential plans for the future, and we let you in on some of the back-end/behind-the-scenes information about how we put this podcast together (and we let you in on our pitiful statistics). And, for the first time, we seek to give a little something back to you, kind listener. We're giving away a copy of Johnathan Haidt's "The Righteous Mind: ...

63 MIN2018 SEP 3
Comments
Bonus Episode 2: State of the Podcast & Our First Giveaway

Episode 19: "Ten Years" & the Road to 2047--Political Eschatology in Hong Kongese Cinema

In this episode, Ryan and Andrew discuss a compilation film called Ten Years. The film is split into five distinct chapters, all of which were written and directed by different auteur Hong Kongese directors. The first episode, Extras, follows two characters (an immigrant from India and a middle-aged failed-Triad) who are caught in a plot to instigate a false flag attack on two public officials; the second episode, Season of the End, explores anthropological taxidermy and the razing of houses at the behest of an ever-encroaching authoritarian government; the third, Dialect, chronicles the day in the life of a Cantonese-speaking taxi-driver who is marginalized due to his inability to speak Madarin (Putonghua) fluently; the fourth episode, Self-Immolator, mixes genres in order to tell a sort of whodunit story about an unknown person who sets themselves ablaze in front of the British consulate; and, finally, the fifth episode, Local Egg, tells the story of Uncle Sam, a Hong Kongese groc...

113 MIN2018 AUG 27
Comments
Episode 19: "Ten Years" & the Road to 2047--Political Eschatology in Hong Kongese Cinema

Episode 18: Populism in America from Donald Trump to Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

In the first half of this episode, Ryan and Andrew attempt to identify the constitutive elements of political populism. Of course, one cannot define populism without first talking about the notion that both left and right populism often manifest as anti-establishment, anti-elite ideologies; however, your hosts attempt to more fully flesh out American populism. In a rare (maybe?) disagreement, Ryan claims that populism is a neutral movement whereas Andrew claims that populism is almost always charged because it is inherently divisive (and therefore moralistic). Your bois, thankfully, adhere to their own conversational advice and, in doing so, they find some common ground. As a supplement to their conversation, Andrew brings up Uri Friedman's article "What Is a Populist?" (which is well worth a read). In the second half of the episode, Ryan and Andrew drill down on left and right wing populism--they use Donald Trump as the embodiment of right wing populism and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez...

90 MIN2018 AUG 20
Comments
Episode 18: Populism in America from Donald Trump to Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

Episode 17 - The Aesthetics of Separation: Hou Hsiao Hsien's THREE TIMES

Episode 17 - The Aesthetics of Separation: Hou Hsiao Hsien's THREE TIMESIn this, our first official film review, episode, your bois discuss Hou Hsiao Hsien's 2005 triptych, THREE TIMES. THREE TIMES is a film divided into three 45-minute sections. Each section is played by the same actors, though the times and characters are different (one takes place in 1966, one in 1911, and one in 2005). In exploring the themes and motifs of THREE TIMES, Ryan and Andrew discuss the cultural and political landscapes of Taiwan during these three eras, and they explore how the characters' identities are shaped by their surroundings and cultural context. This will be the first of three movie reviews as an overview of Chinese cinema (that is, Taiwanese, Hong Kongese, and Mainland Chinese). In a few weeks, we will drop the next episode in the sequence, which will cover a compilation of short films (title: TEN YEARS) from Hong Kong. We will explore the themes in a similar manner in an attempt to understa...

148 MIN2018 AUG 13
Comments
Episode 17 - The Aesthetics of Separation: Hou Hsiao Hsien's THREE TIMES

Episode 16 - What Can We Learn From the Intellectual Dark Web?

In this episode, Andrew and Ryan discuss the lessons that can be taken from the newly coined "Intellectual Dark Web." The hosts cover the ideological connective tissue between the members of the collective, their points of departure, and the limitations of the movement. They move on to the rhetorical strategy of rebranding and manipulating language in order to persuade listeners and give a movement new life. They then grace the audience with their knowledge of photography while critiquing rebranding gone awry. Music Link:http://freemusicarchive.org/music/N_Dropkick/Article Discussion:https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/08/opinion/intellectual-dark-web.htmlHOW TO FIND US:Website: www.seatedinaction.comSpreaker: https://www.spreaker.com/show/seated-in-actioniTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/seated-in-action/id1375517639?mt=2iHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/seated-in-action-29346647/YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_pRDw72eDnL1f5j8oCkLMQSoundcloud: https://so...

109 MIN2018 AUG 6
Comments
Episode 16 - What Can We Learn From the Intellectual Dark Web?

Episode 15: “The Backfire Effect,” Fake News, Russian Bots, & What Russia Wants

We’re talking about Russia today—but first, your hosts talk about a webcomic from The Oatmeal about the Backfire Effect, a psychological phenomenon that tracks the ways in which our brains respond to ideas that challenge our most fundamental ideological suppositions. Studies conducted at the University of Southern California suggest that, when we are faced with such ideas and challenges, our amygdalae fire up and put us in a state of fight or flight—such a phenomenon presents obvious, real world problems. Your hosts use this discussion as a segue into a discussion about memetic theory and the emotional and psychological state of the social media landscape.In the second half of the episode, Ryan and Andrew talk about a tumblr memo that catalogued the expulsion of numerous Russian bot infiltrators on their platform. Ryan points out some of the patterns in the Russian bot names and, in doing so, shows how said pattern functions as a mean to spread discord within the American politic...

105 MIN2018 JUL 30
Comments
Episode 15: “The Backfire Effect,” Fake News, Russian Bots, & What Russia Wants

Latest Episodes

Episode 23 — Can Political Violence Ever Be Justified?

Episode 22 — Can Political Violence Ever Be Justified?Disclaimer: The first half of the episode came out a bit tinny and lo-fi. We don’t know why and we aren’t sure what we did wrong, but we will attempt to change things on the backend to ensure the podcast’s quality is as high as it can be. Sorry. Please love us.In the first half of this episode, your hosts spend some time meditating on the issue of violence. Is it ever justified? Obviously, most can agree that there are instances wherein violence is completely justifiable. But, is it ever acceptable in the political realm? To answer this question, Ryan and Andrew each quote Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. as a springboard into a broader conversation about violence as political strategy. The conversation that ensues encompasses violent revolution, non-violent protest, and the subtleties of the nature of violence as a methodology for change. In the second, better produced, half of this episode, Ryan introduces yet another quotation ...

103 MIN2018 OCT 15
Comments
Episode 23 — Can Political Violence Ever Be Justified?

Episode 22 — What is Postmodernism?

Episode 22 — What is Postmodernism?In the first half of this episode, Ryan and Andrew talk about the notion that people on both sides of the aisle, but primarily those on the right, use and misuse the term “postmodernism.” This begs the question, “what is postmodernism?” Is it an epistemology? Is it a theoretical lens? Is it an ideology that, when mixed with Marxism, will bring about the downfall of the West? But, before Ryan and Andrew can answer any of these questions, they must first answer the question, “what is modernism?” Your hosts spend the first half of this episode defining and describing this term. In the second half of this episode, your hosts transition into a deeper analysis of what constitutes “postmodernism.” In doing so, they explore some of the central tenants of the movement and compare them to how the term is used colloquially. By the end of the episode, through their investigation of these deep questions, your hosts return to a basic truth about philoso...

86 MIN2018 OCT 1
Comments
Episode 22 — What is Postmodernism?

Episode 21 - Re-Calibrating the American Collegiate System

In the first half of this episode, your hosts talk about their recent appearance on Steve Zelt's podcast, "A Small Good Thing" (for more information about the podcast, visit https://www.asmallgoodthing.org/). The conversation lasted about two hours, but the content will be redacted to a trim thirty minutes. Within this conversation, your bois and Zelt grappled with the notion of what universities ought to do, though they did not do so thoroughly. So, we decided to devote an entire episode to talking about what we think the purpose of a university ought to be; in doing so, we articulate six principles upon which universities ought to based.First, we argue that colleges ought to challenge students. We do not merely imply that university coursework ought to be difficult; rather, we argue that professors ought to present controversial ideas that challenge students' fundamental suppositions about what they think they know. Secondly, we argue that in order to achieve the first goal, colle...

110 MIN2018 SEP 17
Comments
Episode 21 - Re-Calibrating the American Collegiate System

Episode 20 - SHOCKING: Seated in Action EVISCERATES Libtards and Cuckservatives!

In the first half of the episode, your hosts congratulate themselves for reaching twenty episodes and usher in the new age of "season two." They move on to apologize about the episode's title. From there, they elaborate on the emotional responses that lie beneath the prevalence of clickbait and other such annoying internet attention grabbers. In the second half, Ryan and Andrew discuss how clickbait titles work to create a less informed audience before moving on to some advice that just might fix the internet if enough people get behind it.You can reach out to Seated in Action by email us at seatedinaction@gmail.com Be sure to subscribe to our podcast, check out our website at www.seatedinaction.com, stayed tune for our next episode, and leave us a (preferably favorable!) review on your podcast app of choice.LINKS:Music Notes:“As Colourful as Ever” by Broke for Free: http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Broke_For_Free/Layers/As_Colorful_As_EverArticles:“One Amazing Reason Clickbait ...

105 MIN2018 SEP 10
Comments
Episode 20 - SHOCKING: Seated in Action EVISCERATES Libtards and Cuckservatives!

Bonus Episode 2: State of the Podcast & Our First Giveaway

At first, your mindful, forward-thinking hosts wanted to make a state of the union podcast for the 20th episode, but then we realized that we already technically released a 20th episode; so, before releasing the actual 20th episode, we're releasing a state of the podcast episode (as, technically, our 22nd episode...). Are we illogical? We like to think not. Is our podcast scheduling odd? Maybe a little. Is this arbitrary? Absolutely, but you've stuck with us thus far and we really wanted to take the time to talk about our first four months in the podcasting world. In this episode, we talk about things we've done poorly, things we've done well, potential plans for the future, and we let you in on some of the back-end/behind-the-scenes information about how we put this podcast together (and we let you in on our pitiful statistics). And, for the first time, we seek to give a little something back to you, kind listener. We're giving away a copy of Johnathan Haidt's "The Righteous Mind: ...

63 MIN2018 SEP 3
Comments
Bonus Episode 2: State of the Podcast & Our First Giveaway

Episode 19: "Ten Years" & the Road to 2047--Political Eschatology in Hong Kongese Cinema

In this episode, Ryan and Andrew discuss a compilation film called Ten Years. The film is split into five distinct chapters, all of which were written and directed by different auteur Hong Kongese directors. The first episode, Extras, follows two characters (an immigrant from India and a middle-aged failed-Triad) who are caught in a plot to instigate a false flag attack on two public officials; the second episode, Season of the End, explores anthropological taxidermy and the razing of houses at the behest of an ever-encroaching authoritarian government; the third, Dialect, chronicles the day in the life of a Cantonese-speaking taxi-driver who is marginalized due to his inability to speak Madarin (Putonghua) fluently; the fourth episode, Self-Immolator, mixes genres in order to tell a sort of whodunit story about an unknown person who sets themselves ablaze in front of the British consulate; and, finally, the fifth episode, Local Egg, tells the story of Uncle Sam, a Hong Kongese groc...

113 MIN2018 AUG 27
Comments
Episode 19: "Ten Years" & the Road to 2047--Political Eschatology in Hong Kongese Cinema

Episode 18: Populism in America from Donald Trump to Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

In the first half of this episode, Ryan and Andrew attempt to identify the constitutive elements of political populism. Of course, one cannot define populism without first talking about the notion that both left and right populism often manifest as anti-establishment, anti-elite ideologies; however, your hosts attempt to more fully flesh out American populism. In a rare (maybe?) disagreement, Ryan claims that populism is a neutral movement whereas Andrew claims that populism is almost always charged because it is inherently divisive (and therefore moralistic). Your bois, thankfully, adhere to their own conversational advice and, in doing so, they find some common ground. As a supplement to their conversation, Andrew brings up Uri Friedman's article "What Is a Populist?" (which is well worth a read). In the second half of the episode, Ryan and Andrew drill down on left and right wing populism--they use Donald Trump as the embodiment of right wing populism and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez...

90 MIN2018 AUG 20
Comments
Episode 18: Populism in America from Donald Trump to Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

Episode 17 - The Aesthetics of Separation: Hou Hsiao Hsien's THREE TIMES

Episode 17 - The Aesthetics of Separation: Hou Hsiao Hsien's THREE TIMESIn this, our first official film review, episode, your bois discuss Hou Hsiao Hsien's 2005 triptych, THREE TIMES. THREE TIMES is a film divided into three 45-minute sections. Each section is played by the same actors, though the times and characters are different (one takes place in 1966, one in 1911, and one in 2005). In exploring the themes and motifs of THREE TIMES, Ryan and Andrew discuss the cultural and political landscapes of Taiwan during these three eras, and they explore how the characters' identities are shaped by their surroundings and cultural context. This will be the first of three movie reviews as an overview of Chinese cinema (that is, Taiwanese, Hong Kongese, and Mainland Chinese). In a few weeks, we will drop the next episode in the sequence, which will cover a compilation of short films (title: TEN YEARS) from Hong Kong. We will explore the themes in a similar manner in an attempt to understa...

148 MIN2018 AUG 13
Comments
Episode 17 - The Aesthetics of Separation: Hou Hsiao Hsien's THREE TIMES

Episode 16 - What Can We Learn From the Intellectual Dark Web?

In this episode, Andrew and Ryan discuss the lessons that can be taken from the newly coined "Intellectual Dark Web." The hosts cover the ideological connective tissue between the members of the collective, their points of departure, and the limitations of the movement. They move on to the rhetorical strategy of rebranding and manipulating language in order to persuade listeners and give a movement new life. They then grace the audience with their knowledge of photography while critiquing rebranding gone awry. Music Link:http://freemusicarchive.org/music/N_Dropkick/Article Discussion:https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/08/opinion/intellectual-dark-web.htmlHOW TO FIND US:Website: www.seatedinaction.comSpreaker: https://www.spreaker.com/show/seated-in-actioniTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/seated-in-action/id1375517639?mt=2iHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/seated-in-action-29346647/YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_pRDw72eDnL1f5j8oCkLMQSoundcloud: https://so...

109 MIN2018 AUG 6
Comments
Episode 16 - What Can We Learn From the Intellectual Dark Web?

Episode 15: “The Backfire Effect,” Fake News, Russian Bots, & What Russia Wants

We’re talking about Russia today—but first, your hosts talk about a webcomic from The Oatmeal about the Backfire Effect, a psychological phenomenon that tracks the ways in which our brains respond to ideas that challenge our most fundamental ideological suppositions. Studies conducted at the University of Southern California suggest that, when we are faced with such ideas and challenges, our amygdalae fire up and put us in a state of fight or flight—such a phenomenon presents obvious, real world problems. Your hosts use this discussion as a segue into a discussion about memetic theory and the emotional and psychological state of the social media landscape.In the second half of the episode, Ryan and Andrew talk about a tumblr memo that catalogued the expulsion of numerous Russian bot infiltrators on their platform. Ryan points out some of the patterns in the Russian bot names and, in doing so, shows how said pattern functions as a mean to spread discord within the American politic...

105 MIN2018 JUL 30
Comments
Episode 15: “The Backfire Effect,” Fake News, Russian Bots, & What Russia Wants
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