title

All Ruby Podcasts by Devchat.tv

Devchat.tv

13
Followers
4
Plays
All Ruby Podcasts by Devchat.tv
All Ruby Podcasts by Devchat.tv

All Ruby Podcasts by Devchat.tv

Devchat.tv

13
Followers
4
Plays
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About Us

All ruby related podcasts from Devchat.tv, including: - Ruby Rogues - My Ruby Story - Ruby Rants

Latest Episodes

RR 441: Solidus with Alessandro Desantis

Alessandro Desantis is the director of Nebulab and is currently working on Solidus. After talking a little bit about how Nebulab got started, he describes what Solidus is. Solidus is a free, open source eCommerce platform built in Ruby on Rails that gives you complete control over your store. Three things that set it apart from other eCommerce platforms are that it is governed by a single company and that the focus is on quality and backwards compatibility. One of their biggest goals is to make Solidus streamlined, and Alessandro talks about how they handle it with the complex business logic involved in eCommerce. He talks more about the governance of Solidus and the different teams involved. Alessandro admits that Solidus has fewer features than some of its competitors, but this makes it very powerful and customizable. It can be tacked onto any Rails engine and you can pick and choose the things you want. Solidus was made with fewer features because of the unique nature of each eCommerce store. The creators noticed that when people create their stores, they had to adapt their business to suit the eCommerce software they used because the software was not as customizable. Solidus wanted to avoid that, so they provide the foundation and people can customize it. To customize Solidus, the documentation is available on the Solidus website, but the company encourages experimentation. Alessandro regrets that people think eCommerce companies are not technology companies, and so they tend to delegate it to someone else. He and Charles talk about some of the technical aspects of Solidus and what the future holds. In the future, the company plans to emphasize communication and the presentation of Solidus as a tool to help people make the right choice for their business, as well as streamlining the onboarding experience. To contribute to Solidus, you can contribute to the core itself or any of the extensions. There is also an active Slack community where you can ask for the best place to help. The show concludes with Alessandro talking about some of the other projects he’s working on. Panelists Charles Max Wood Guest Alessandro Desantis Sponsors Sentry | Use the code “devchat” for $100 credit Cloud 66 - Pain Free Rails Deployments Try Cloud 66 Rails for FREE & get $100 of free credits with promo code RubyRogues-19 RedisGreen Links Solidus Nebulab Shopify Backbone Solidus Slack community Follow Alessandro on Medium and Alessandro.codes Picks Charles Max Wood: A Christmas Story Alessandro Desantis: London, UK Elixir Phoenix

31 MIN2 d ago
Comments
RR 441: Solidus with Alessandro Desantis

RR 440: Swagger and OpenAPI with Josh Ponelat

Today the panel discusses the difference between Swagger and Open API with Josh Ponelat. Josh details the difference between the two. Swagger is a set of protocols around describing restful APIs. Swagger was taken over by a company called SmartBear, who donated the donated the specification to the Open Linux Foundation, and that became the Open API. Swagger is the tooling surrounding these specifications. Open API is a standardized way to describe a restful API in a YAML file. Once you’ve got a YAML file to describe your API, you can use tooling like Swagger to leverage that and take it to the next level. Using the Open API process is useful for situations where you already have an API in place, but want to codify and document it so that it’s controlled. Then going forward, you won’t introduce contradictions and it remains consistent because it’s documented in a YAML file. The process leaves room for enhancement in the future as well. Josh talks about some of the benefits of sta...

46 MIN1 w ago
Comments
RR 440: Swagger and OpenAPI with Josh Ponelat

RR 439: Human Powered Rails: Automated Crowdsourcing In Your RoR App with Andrew Glass

Andrew Glass is a Brooklyn based Rubyist operating a small independent devshop called Bang Equals. He has held many ‘enrichment jobs’, including being a ball person at US Open for 5 years, traveling for judging Guinness World Record attempts, and will be a balloon holder in the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade this year. Today the panel is discussing his about his 2018 RailsConf talk, Human Powered Rails: Automated Crowdsourcing In Your Ruby on Rails App. In his talk, he shows the audience how to use Amazon Mechanical Turk. Amazon Mechanical Turk lets you post tasks, set a price point, and then people can go and complete the task. This is often done with tasks that can’t be done with machine learning and to train machine learning algorithms. In his talk he goes into What it is, how it’s used, and how we can use Ruby to automate the process. In his apps, he uses it for lead generation, qualification, enrichment, and some video and photo tagging. More specific uses include recording items from a picture of a shopping list, identifying specific things in a video, categorizing businesses and items, sentiment analysis of text or image. Overall, Mechanical Turk is used for things that machine learning can’t handle yet. The panel discusses some different uses for crowdsourcing and how to submit something to Mechanical Turk. There are multiple ways to ensure accuracy in your surveys, including setting up multiple stages to your task, having more than one person complete your task, and creating a qualified worker pool based on tests to determine their aptitude and skill. The panel discusses some of the controversy surrounding Mechanical Turk, citing an article in the New York Times (see links). The big issue is wages and worker rights. Wages can be very low, and it is ripe for abuse by companies as they could easily refuse all work and withhold pay. It is also important for the companies to give an accurate time estimate for the task and a reasonable reimbursement. Mechanical Turk attracts a variety of people, from people that do it for fun to people to actually do it for a living, so it is vital that companies use the tool responsibly. Andrew talks more about how his app works. His apps are built on RTurk, Turkee, and Mechanical Turk, and he talks about how they work. The tricky part is figuring out the logic for what answers they will accept. Andrew talks about how to get started with Mechanical Turk and how to validate the work you get back. To ensure you get accurate information, he suggest that you make it happy for your users, make the UX simple and usable, and use a lot of formatting in your forms so that you get good information in. They preface their results with an accuracy score to help determine what is true. Andrew talks about where he wants to go from he. His Turking days are behind him, but his days of coordinating the efforts of many using software show promise. Panelists Dave Kimura Charles Max Wood Guest Andrew Glass Sponsors Sentry | Use the code “devchat” for $100 credit Cloud 66 - Pain Free Rails Deployments Try Cloud 66 Rails for FREE & get $100 of free credits with promo code RubyRogues-19 RedisGreen Links Human Powered Rails: Automated Crowdsourcing In Your RoR App by Andrew Glass Amazon Mechanical Turk AWS Transcribe I Found Work on an Amazon Website. I Made 97 Cents an Hour. RTurk Turkee AWS SDK Turk Picks Dave Kimura: HatchBox Charles Max Wood: The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job White Christmas Andrew Glass: Foragoodstrftime.com Follow Andrew @andrewglass1 on Twitter and Instagram and andyglass.co

44 MIN2 w ago
Comments
RR 439: Human Powered Rails: Automated Crowdsourcing In Your RoR App with Andrew Glass

The MaxCoders Guide To Finding Your Dream Developer Job

"The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is available on Amazon. Get your copy here today only for $2.99!

14 MIN3 w ago
Comments
The MaxCoders Guide To Finding Your Dream Developer Job

RR 438: Deviating from the Rails Core

Today Charles and Dave are discussing deviating from the Rails core. Dave doesn’t care for JavaScript frameworks or microservices as he believes that they add too much complexity. These things may become necessary when your project gets massive, but otherwise we shouldn’t jump to these as a first option. If you don’t need the frontend powerhouse features, you may want to see how far you can get with Rails and a minimal frontend. React may not always be the solution that you need. They discuss jQuery versus Stimulus. They both preferjQuery over Stimulus as they find it less invasive and clunky, and it’s easier to drop things in. Dave talks about his experience with ElasticSearch and how he simplified it. They discuss using MongoDB and Mongoid. They agree that although these are not Ruby specific, they can help. Dave, however, has not found a need for them, while Charles has found that it gave him more advantages in his schema. He talks about some other advantages of MongoDB. Dave...

43 MIN3 w ago
Comments
RR 438: Deviating from the Rails Core

RR 437: Deploying Rails Onto Kubernetes with Khash Sajadi

Khash and Kasia workfor Cloud 66, a company started in 2012 with a goal to make Rails deployment simple and infrastructure easy to understand for application developers. As the company has moved towards containerization, they have integrated with Kubernetes. Khash talks about what distinguishes Cloud 66 from other platform as a service companies and why the company was started. He begins by talking about the structure of Heroku, how they own the entire stack down to the server, and how they are bound to a data center. Cloud 66 differs because they decided to break that unit economy from a data center to a server, so they don’t own the entire stack. Instead, they deploy what looks like an experience from Heroku onto your own server so you can go anywhere you want to go. They talk to the public API of those cloud providers within the data center that you choose that your account is in, and then provision, deploy, and maintain your application the way that you used to with Heroku, on ...

55 MINNOV 12
Comments
RR 437: Deploying Rails Onto Kubernetes with Khash Sajadi

RR 436: Determining Pricing with Michael Herold

Michael Herold is married to an economist and is a staff engineer at Flywheel where he writes Ruby programs to support PHP programs. He gave a talk at RailsConf 2018 about how to price a product. The frame for the problem is whenever you have a business idea, you eventually have to decide how to price it, and the pricing area is ripe for inefficiency on both customer and business ends. In his talk, he gave a simple framework based on the field of market research that helps give you an idea of what to price your product or service at called the Van Westendorp Price Sensitivity Meter, which is based off of talking with your customers about how they would value your product. He explains the difference between consumer surplus and producer surplus. The panel discusses other ways of determining pricing, such as basing your price off the price of a similar product. They discuss the pros and cons of different complex pricing they’ve seen. While complex pricing can be a turn off for many c...

45 MINNOV 5
Comments
RR 436: Determining Pricing with Michael Herold

MRS 101: Taylor Jones

My Ruby Story this week welcomes Taylor Jones, Support Engineer at Heroku. Charles asks Taylor how he ended up at Heroku. Taylor shares his journey after majoring in Computer Science at Auburn University. Taylor had a lot of downtime in his first job so he started learning Rails online. Then after he graduated he was able to get more chances working full time with Ruby. He then started speaking at conferences such as RailsConf. Charles and Taylor talk about how working at a place you really want to is not a pie in the sky but actually is doable if you position yourself correctly. For example Taylor really wanted to work at Heroku and was friends with the people at Heroku. When there was an opening his friends contacted him and Taylor was able to find a job at Heroku. Charles wonders what drew Taylor to programming and Taylor talks about how he was introduced to developing through video games. Taylor also talks about the concept " if you start out with Ruby you stick with Ruby" and h...

42 MINOCT 29
Comments
MRS 101: Taylor Jones

MRS 100: The Origin and Impact of My Ruby Story

My Ruby Story celebrates its 100th episode. To commemorate the 100th episode host Charles Max Wood talks about how My Ruby Story podcast started and how it progressed. My Ruby Story started off as a spin-off of Ruby Rogues. Acting upon advice from a business coach he was working with at the time, Charles misunderstood her suggestion to double on Ruby Rogues and instead proceeded to create a podcast similar to Ruby Rogues. Over the years, the show proceeded to inspire many developers who are just starting out and the show developed a fan base of its own. Over the years, My Ruby Story has helped people get better jobs, shaped their careers. For those who have been positively affected, Charles requests them to send him an email sharing how My Ruby Story or any other Devchat.tv podcast. If you have any questions or are struggling with how to get a better job, how to talk to your boss, or what steps to take to better your developer career, Charles schedule a call at Schedule a 15 Minute ...

28 MINOCT 22
Comments
MRS 100: The Origin and Impact of My Ruby Story

RR 435: Alternatives to Adding React with Graham Conzett

Graham Conzett has been a developer for 12 years. He has worked with Ruby and Rails for half of that, and currently works for a company that does large format touchscreens. Graham gave a talk at RailsConf 2018 called “Old School JavaScript and Rails” where he talks about the experience of JavaScript fatigue. The world of JavaScript changes very quickly, and sometimes it feels like there’s a new framework every week. Because there is no clear winner among these frameworks, many Rails developers feel compelled to reach for something like React. However, there are many strategies for doing JavaScript in Ruby and in Rails that existed before these frameworks, so you can accomplish what you want to get done without bringing one in. Remember that all of them can coexist side by side, so you don’t have to pick one strategy. The panel discusses the effect that adopting a new technology can have on the team, such as the learning curve and hiring people that specialize in it. To illustrat...

59 MINOCT 22
Comments
RR 435: Alternatives to Adding React with Graham Conzett

Latest Episodes

RR 441: Solidus with Alessandro Desantis

Alessandro Desantis is the director of Nebulab and is currently working on Solidus. After talking a little bit about how Nebulab got started, he describes what Solidus is. Solidus is a free, open source eCommerce platform built in Ruby on Rails that gives you complete control over your store. Three things that set it apart from other eCommerce platforms are that it is governed by a single company and that the focus is on quality and backwards compatibility. One of their biggest goals is to make Solidus streamlined, and Alessandro talks about how they handle it with the complex business logic involved in eCommerce. He talks more about the governance of Solidus and the different teams involved. Alessandro admits that Solidus has fewer features than some of its competitors, but this makes it very powerful and customizable. It can be tacked onto any Rails engine and you can pick and choose the things you want. Solidus was made with fewer features because of the unique nature of each eCommerce store. The creators noticed that when people create their stores, they had to adapt their business to suit the eCommerce software they used because the software was not as customizable. Solidus wanted to avoid that, so they provide the foundation and people can customize it. To customize Solidus, the documentation is available on the Solidus website, but the company encourages experimentation. Alessandro regrets that people think eCommerce companies are not technology companies, and so they tend to delegate it to someone else. He and Charles talk about some of the technical aspects of Solidus and what the future holds. In the future, the company plans to emphasize communication and the presentation of Solidus as a tool to help people make the right choice for their business, as well as streamlining the onboarding experience. To contribute to Solidus, you can contribute to the core itself or any of the extensions. There is also an active Slack community where you can ask for the best place to help. The show concludes with Alessandro talking about some of the other projects he’s working on. Panelists Charles Max Wood Guest Alessandro Desantis Sponsors Sentry | Use the code “devchat” for $100 credit Cloud 66 - Pain Free Rails Deployments Try Cloud 66 Rails for FREE & get $100 of free credits with promo code RubyRogues-19 RedisGreen Links Solidus Nebulab Shopify Backbone Solidus Slack community Follow Alessandro on Medium and Alessandro.codes Picks Charles Max Wood: A Christmas Story Alessandro Desantis: London, UK Elixir Phoenix

31 MIN2 d ago
Comments
RR 441: Solidus with Alessandro Desantis

RR 440: Swagger and OpenAPI with Josh Ponelat

Today the panel discusses the difference between Swagger and Open API with Josh Ponelat. Josh details the difference between the two. Swagger is a set of protocols around describing restful APIs. Swagger was taken over by a company called SmartBear, who donated the donated the specification to the Open Linux Foundation, and that became the Open API. Swagger is the tooling surrounding these specifications. Open API is a standardized way to describe a restful API in a YAML file. Once you’ve got a YAML file to describe your API, you can use tooling like Swagger to leverage that and take it to the next level. Using the Open API process is useful for situations where you already have an API in place, but want to codify and document it so that it’s controlled. Then going forward, you won’t introduce contradictions and it remains consistent because it’s documented in a YAML file. The process leaves room for enhancement in the future as well. Josh talks about some of the benefits of sta...

46 MIN1 w ago
Comments
RR 440: Swagger and OpenAPI with Josh Ponelat

RR 439: Human Powered Rails: Automated Crowdsourcing In Your RoR App with Andrew Glass

Andrew Glass is a Brooklyn based Rubyist operating a small independent devshop called Bang Equals. He has held many ‘enrichment jobs’, including being a ball person at US Open for 5 years, traveling for judging Guinness World Record attempts, and will be a balloon holder in the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade this year. Today the panel is discussing his about his 2018 RailsConf talk, Human Powered Rails: Automated Crowdsourcing In Your Ruby on Rails App. In his talk, he shows the audience how to use Amazon Mechanical Turk. Amazon Mechanical Turk lets you post tasks, set a price point, and then people can go and complete the task. This is often done with tasks that can’t be done with machine learning and to train machine learning algorithms. In his talk he goes into What it is, how it’s used, and how we can use Ruby to automate the process. In his apps, he uses it for lead generation, qualification, enrichment, and some video and photo tagging. More specific uses include recording items from a picture of a shopping list, identifying specific things in a video, categorizing businesses and items, sentiment analysis of text or image. Overall, Mechanical Turk is used for things that machine learning can’t handle yet. The panel discusses some different uses for crowdsourcing and how to submit something to Mechanical Turk. There are multiple ways to ensure accuracy in your surveys, including setting up multiple stages to your task, having more than one person complete your task, and creating a qualified worker pool based on tests to determine their aptitude and skill. The panel discusses some of the controversy surrounding Mechanical Turk, citing an article in the New York Times (see links). The big issue is wages and worker rights. Wages can be very low, and it is ripe for abuse by companies as they could easily refuse all work and withhold pay. It is also important for the companies to give an accurate time estimate for the task and a reasonable reimbursement. Mechanical Turk attracts a variety of people, from people that do it for fun to people to actually do it for a living, so it is vital that companies use the tool responsibly. Andrew talks more about how his app works. His apps are built on RTurk, Turkee, and Mechanical Turk, and he talks about how they work. The tricky part is figuring out the logic for what answers they will accept. Andrew talks about how to get started with Mechanical Turk and how to validate the work you get back. To ensure you get accurate information, he suggest that you make it happy for your users, make the UX simple and usable, and use a lot of formatting in your forms so that you get good information in. They preface their results with an accuracy score to help determine what is true. Andrew talks about where he wants to go from he. His Turking days are behind him, but his days of coordinating the efforts of many using software show promise. Panelists Dave Kimura Charles Max Wood Guest Andrew Glass Sponsors Sentry | Use the code “devchat” for $100 credit Cloud 66 - Pain Free Rails Deployments Try Cloud 66 Rails for FREE & get $100 of free credits with promo code RubyRogues-19 RedisGreen Links Human Powered Rails: Automated Crowdsourcing In Your RoR App by Andrew Glass Amazon Mechanical Turk AWS Transcribe I Found Work on an Amazon Website. I Made 97 Cents an Hour. RTurk Turkee AWS SDK Turk Picks Dave Kimura: HatchBox Charles Max Wood: The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job White Christmas Andrew Glass: Foragoodstrftime.com Follow Andrew @andrewglass1 on Twitter and Instagram and andyglass.co

44 MIN2 w ago
Comments
RR 439: Human Powered Rails: Automated Crowdsourcing In Your RoR App with Andrew Glass

The MaxCoders Guide To Finding Your Dream Developer Job

"The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is available on Amazon. Get your copy here today only for $2.99!

14 MIN3 w ago
Comments
The MaxCoders Guide To Finding Your Dream Developer Job

RR 438: Deviating from the Rails Core

Today Charles and Dave are discussing deviating from the Rails core. Dave doesn’t care for JavaScript frameworks or microservices as he believes that they add too much complexity. These things may become necessary when your project gets massive, but otherwise we shouldn’t jump to these as a first option. If you don’t need the frontend powerhouse features, you may want to see how far you can get with Rails and a minimal frontend. React may not always be the solution that you need. They discuss jQuery versus Stimulus. They both preferjQuery over Stimulus as they find it less invasive and clunky, and it’s easier to drop things in. Dave talks about his experience with ElasticSearch and how he simplified it. They discuss using MongoDB and Mongoid. They agree that although these are not Ruby specific, they can help. Dave, however, has not found a need for them, while Charles has found that it gave him more advantages in his schema. He talks about some other advantages of MongoDB. Dave...

43 MIN3 w ago
Comments
RR 438: Deviating from the Rails Core

RR 437: Deploying Rails Onto Kubernetes with Khash Sajadi

Khash and Kasia workfor Cloud 66, a company started in 2012 with a goal to make Rails deployment simple and infrastructure easy to understand for application developers. As the company has moved towards containerization, they have integrated with Kubernetes. Khash talks about what distinguishes Cloud 66 from other platform as a service companies and why the company was started. He begins by talking about the structure of Heroku, how they own the entire stack down to the server, and how they are bound to a data center. Cloud 66 differs because they decided to break that unit economy from a data center to a server, so they don’t own the entire stack. Instead, they deploy what looks like an experience from Heroku onto your own server so you can go anywhere you want to go. They talk to the public API of those cloud providers within the data center that you choose that your account is in, and then provision, deploy, and maintain your application the way that you used to with Heroku, on ...

55 MINNOV 12
Comments
RR 437: Deploying Rails Onto Kubernetes with Khash Sajadi

RR 436: Determining Pricing with Michael Herold

Michael Herold is married to an economist and is a staff engineer at Flywheel where he writes Ruby programs to support PHP programs. He gave a talk at RailsConf 2018 about how to price a product. The frame for the problem is whenever you have a business idea, you eventually have to decide how to price it, and the pricing area is ripe for inefficiency on both customer and business ends. In his talk, he gave a simple framework based on the field of market research that helps give you an idea of what to price your product or service at called the Van Westendorp Price Sensitivity Meter, which is based off of talking with your customers about how they would value your product. He explains the difference between consumer surplus and producer surplus. The panel discusses other ways of determining pricing, such as basing your price off the price of a similar product. They discuss the pros and cons of different complex pricing they’ve seen. While complex pricing can be a turn off for many c...

45 MINNOV 5
Comments
RR 436: Determining Pricing with Michael Herold

MRS 101: Taylor Jones

My Ruby Story this week welcomes Taylor Jones, Support Engineer at Heroku. Charles asks Taylor how he ended up at Heroku. Taylor shares his journey after majoring in Computer Science at Auburn University. Taylor had a lot of downtime in his first job so he started learning Rails online. Then after he graduated he was able to get more chances working full time with Ruby. He then started speaking at conferences such as RailsConf. Charles and Taylor talk about how working at a place you really want to is not a pie in the sky but actually is doable if you position yourself correctly. For example Taylor really wanted to work at Heroku and was friends with the people at Heroku. When there was an opening his friends contacted him and Taylor was able to find a job at Heroku. Charles wonders what drew Taylor to programming and Taylor talks about how he was introduced to developing through video games. Taylor also talks about the concept " if you start out with Ruby you stick with Ruby" and h...

42 MINOCT 29
Comments
MRS 101: Taylor Jones

MRS 100: The Origin and Impact of My Ruby Story

My Ruby Story celebrates its 100th episode. To commemorate the 100th episode host Charles Max Wood talks about how My Ruby Story podcast started and how it progressed. My Ruby Story started off as a spin-off of Ruby Rogues. Acting upon advice from a business coach he was working with at the time, Charles misunderstood her suggestion to double on Ruby Rogues and instead proceeded to create a podcast similar to Ruby Rogues. Over the years, the show proceeded to inspire many developers who are just starting out and the show developed a fan base of its own. Over the years, My Ruby Story has helped people get better jobs, shaped their careers. For those who have been positively affected, Charles requests them to send him an email sharing how My Ruby Story or any other Devchat.tv podcast. If you have any questions or are struggling with how to get a better job, how to talk to your boss, or what steps to take to better your developer career, Charles schedule a call at Schedule a 15 Minute ...

28 MINOCT 22
Comments
MRS 100: The Origin and Impact of My Ruby Story

RR 435: Alternatives to Adding React with Graham Conzett

Graham Conzett has been a developer for 12 years. He has worked with Ruby and Rails for half of that, and currently works for a company that does large format touchscreens. Graham gave a talk at RailsConf 2018 called “Old School JavaScript and Rails” where he talks about the experience of JavaScript fatigue. The world of JavaScript changes very quickly, and sometimes it feels like there’s a new framework every week. Because there is no clear winner among these frameworks, many Rails developers feel compelled to reach for something like React. However, there are many strategies for doing JavaScript in Ruby and in Rails that existed before these frameworks, so you can accomplish what you want to get done without bringing one in. Remember that all of them can coexist side by side, so you don’t have to pick one strategy. The panel discusses the effect that adopting a new technology can have on the team, such as the learning curve and hiring people that specialize in it. To illustrat...

59 MINOCT 22
Comments
RR 435: Alternatives to Adding React with Graham Conzett
hmly
himalayaプレミアムへようこそ聴き放題のオーディオブックをお楽しみください。