title

ASCA Podcast

Joseph Coyne

1
Followers
7
Plays
ASCA Podcast
ASCA Podcast

ASCA Podcast

Joseph Coyne

1
Followers
7
Plays
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ASCA | Ensuring excellence in strength and conditioning.

Latest Episodes

ASCA Podcast #40 - Dr. Nick Winkelman

Nick Winkelman is the head of athletic performance & science for the Irish Rugby Football Union. His primary role is to oversee the delivery and development of strength & conditioning and sports science across all national (Men and Women | XV’s and 7’s) and provincial teams (Leinster, Munster, Connacht, and Ulster). Prior to working for Irish Rugby, Nick was the director of education and training systems for EXOS (formerly Athletes' Performance), located in Phoenix, AZ. As the director of education, Nick oversaw the development and execution of all internal and external educational initiatives. As a performance coach, Nick oversaw the speed and assessment component of the EXOS NFL Combine Development Program, and supported many athletes across the NFL, MLB, NBA, National Sport Organizations, and Military. Nick completed his PhD through Rocky Mountain University of Health Professions with a dissertation focus on motor skill learning and sprinting. Nick is an internationally recognized speaker on human performance and coaching science, and has multiple publications through the UKSCA, NSCA, IDEA Health and Fitness, Human Movement Science, and Routledge. Nick’s new book, The Language of Coaching, is scheduled to be released late 2019 by Human Kinetics. QUOTES “There is a ceiling effect with cueing expert performers” “The descriptive language of the WHAT is not the same as coaching language of the HOW” “The cue is matter of facilitating the last idea that goes into an athlete's head before they move” “How can you become a micro storyteller and wire that into your coaching?” “Every cue manifests as a thought and we have to take that responsibility for what that cue says” “How we train has immediate consequences on the thoughts we use when we perform” Show notes 1) Nick’s backstory from college to EXOS to the IRFU 2) The use of language to improve movement skill development and the research on different types of cues. 3) The effect of different cues on the retention of movement skills and psychological familiarity with cues 4) The Describe-Demo-Cue-Do-Debref loop 5) How to come up with cues that fit learning styles using the distance-direction-description paradigm 6) Analogies and inviting the athlete into the story 7) The difference between memory and attention and overloading athletes 8) Pain science and the words we use 9) Flow state, streaking and slumping PEOPLE MENTIONED Mark Vestergen Connor Gleadhill Rob Gray Barbara Tversky James Clear

74 MIN1 days ago
Comments
ASCA Podcast #40 - Dr. Nick Winkelman

ASCA Podcast #39 - John Mitchell and Stephen Bird PhD

The ASCA Board always works to ensure the ASCA provides the support Members and Coaches need to feel confident within their qualifications and standing in the sporting and strength and conditioning industry. Part of this was the development of the ASCA Professional Coach Accreditation Scheme (PCAS). The PCAS was primarily developed for the following reasons: - To recognise coaching experience in addition to education - Delineate the scope of the Strength and Conditioning professional - Create a structured mentoring network - Provide employers and ASCA members with a framework of job competencies and proposed remuneration schedules ASCA Board Member, John Mitchell, was instrumental in the development of the PCAS and has recently shared his experiences in both the industry and the development of the PCAS in a podcast with Dr Stephen Bird, ASCA inaugural Mentor Coach of the Year and Associate Editor of JASC. In this podcast Dr Bird and John Mitchell discuss the establishment of the PCA...

36 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
ASCA Podcast #39 - John Mitchell and Stephen Bird PhD

ASCA Podcast #38 - Jan Legg

Jan Legg has been the lead strength and conditioning coach for the Australian Women’s basketball team, the Opals since 2013 as well as the working with Basketball Australia’s development squad at the Centre of Excellence in Canberra. Jan is an Australian Strength and Conditioning Association (ASCA) accredited Level 3 and Master Pro-Structure coach at the Australian Institute of Sport in Canberra. QUOTES “All these basketball players have a dominant leg and what is an acceptable asymmetry? 10%? 15%? 20%?” “At least 1 to 2 warm ups a week will be barefoot” “Our athletes only have an offseason when they get hurt so my strength levels are all designed to make them robust enough and especially for female athletes we have to make sure the hamstrings are strong enough” “Most of the year I train full body” “Any rehabilitation should be making the overall athlete better than they were before” “While you are studying, volunteer your time and get to know people” SHOWNOTES 1) Jan's background in S&C 2) Benchmarking Physical standards for world class performances in womens basketball 3) Variability in jump kinematics over a season and how jump height does not tell complete story 4) How Jan's warm ups are structured and the benefits of barefoot work 5) What does a strength & conditioning session look like for an international level basketball 6) Programming ESD for court sports and considerations for tall heavy athletes 7) The AIS rehabilitation program 8) What did Jan learn on previous international study tours 9) Females in S&C, differences in coaching male and female athletes and career paths for any S&C coach PEOPLE MENTIONED John Mitchell Martin Bucheitt Matt Wenning Julian Jones Ross Smith

64 MINAUG 17
Comments
ASCA Podcast #38 - Jan Legg

ASCA Podcast #37 - Dr. Justin Keogh

Justin Keogh is an Associate Professor in the School of Health Sciences and Medicine, Bond University where he is the coordinator of the Masters of Sport Science program. He has taught into biomechanics, motor control and performance analysis subjects at an undergraduate and postgraduate level. His primary research interests focus on improving the transfer of strength and conditioning as well as skill-based training to sporting performance and/or reduced risk of injury. Current research projects and HDR supervision include Australian rules football, swimming, BMX, strongman and kettlebell projects. QUOTES “Heavy concentric work (eg sleds) are quite easy to recover from” “Doing work at long muscle lengths or with eccentric emphasis will increase fascicle length” “Research probably isn’t ever going to be able to answer every question S&C coaches will have so we need to use trial and error and our best guess” “The only thing that really matters is the transfer of the training we have our athletes do to the actual competition performance” SHOWNOTES 1) Justin's background and current role at Bond University 2) The application of research on strongman and powerlifting 3) Sled sprinting, motor learning and spinal loading 4) Donor sports for movement, decision-making and tactical improvements 5) Tapering practices for strength sport athletes 6) Posterior chain principles 7) How to combine eccentric and concentric focuses for athletes 8) Motor control learning concepts to maximise transfer 9) Overcoaching and verbal cues 10) Needs analysis and reverse engineering from game stats/KPIs PEOPLE MENTIONED Paul Winwood Lloyd Reynolds Jason Lake Stuart McGill Matt Rossiter Kelvin Giles Hayden Pricthard Tony Shield Dave Opar Daniel Chalkley David Watts Carl Woods Bob Alejo

100 MINJUL 25
Comments
ASCA Podcast #37 - Dr. Justin Keogh

ASCA Podcast #36 - Dr. Mark McKean

Mark has a PhD in Sport Science and is an ASCA Master Coach. Mark is Head of Physical Performance in High Performance Sport at University of the Sunshine Coast Lead working specifically with USC Spartans High Performance Swimming and Sunshine Coast Lightning Netball teams. QUOTES “We have to make sure we build capacity in their strength to allow them the capacity to do the work they need to do” “Perhaps the biggest challenge working with Paralympic athletes is overcoming the history of people being overly protective with them” “One of the things I still like to do is make sure the athletes have a good push:pull ratio in the upper body” “Since I started with the netballers all our work off court has been done off legs on bikes” “Netball is really a deceleration sport” “If your foot is in the air, you are going nowhere with change of direction” “One of the reasons why the coaches think we were able to run out games was we did less rather than more plyometrics in training” SHOWNOTES 1) Marks background as a PE teacher, trainer/strength coach and at USC 2) Training for paddling sports, internal strength versus external strength and tendon management 3) Swimming dry land work 4) Inspiratory muscle training 5) Paralympic Athletes considerations and overcoming challenges 6) Shoulder health, strength ratios in shoulder and tree climibing animal species 7) Working with netballers 8) COD principles and how to blend in agility 9) Testing and monitoring in court sports 10) Key strength lifts in gym for COD 11) Postural and movement screening 12) Managing tendon load and Mark's tickle 13) The value of post graduate work People mentioned Clint Robinson Adam Peaty Jan Prins Blake Cochran Craig Boettcher Tim Brown Kelvin GIles

90 MINJUN 20
Comments
ASCA Podcast #36 - Dr. Mark McKean

ASCA Podcast #35 - Dr. Jan Prins

Jan Prins has been involved in swimming coaching & research for more than 48 years. He is the director of the Aquatic Research Laboratory, and teaches Biomechanics, at the University of Hawaii. For the past 8 years he has been involved with unique swimming research using multiple, high-speed cameras examining the stroke mechanics of elite swimmers. Data collected from competitive swimmers, include Olympic, World champions, and former world record holders. Noting the need for “specificity” as applied to strength training for each respective sport, he continues to examine the applications of his research to improving dry-land programs for competitive swimmers. QUOTES “We are finding things that are very different to what the expectations are (of swimming coaches)” “Elite swimmers are not swimming with their elbows bent a lot” “Swimmers know instinctively that they should be moving fast on dry land” “Focus on the decelerators” “The bottom line is speed of body relative to the side of the pool” “Watch these things because of the research but don’t just do the one thing because the athletes will get fed up over the season” Show notes 1) Jan's background at Indiana and Hawaii as a swim coach and biomechanistic 2) High speed underwater multi-camera videography 3) The importance of measuring body segment velocity and impulse in swimming 4) The key takeaways from the biomechanical analysis and application to dryland training – i) straighter arms ii) lats and medial rotators iii) decelerators of elbow iv) wrist flexors 5) The four aspects of specificity for any sports training 6) The importance of wrist and finger strength and being able to hold that in the water 7) Why you can’t just focus on the “best” exercises for swimming all year round 8) Closed chain pulling and being aware of relative speeds of the body to the side of pool and the arms to thebody 9) The application of Jan's research to Paralympic swimmers 10) Use of hydrotherapy and aquatic physical therapy and how to apply to other athletes People mentioned James Counselman Mark Spitz James Magnussen Emily Seebohm Mack Horton Matt Brown Dennis Cotterill

59 MINMAY 18
Comments
ASCA Podcast #35 - Dr. Jan Prins

ASCA Podcast #34 - Grant Jenkins

With almost 20 years of coaching under his belt, Grant is a proud to be ASCA Master Coach. He is the director of PropelPerform, a high performance training facility that also consults and contracts to schools, clubs, State and National Sporting Organisations. At the moment, most of his athletes compete in action/extreme sports. QUOTES “There are two types of coaches: those that are fired and those about to be fired” “Part of that process of us maturing as coaches is we start to see more and more grey” “I want your theoretical knowledge to be no more than 10% above your practical knowledge” “Sometimes it is better to talk in black and white rather than in grey, especially with novices” “Let’s get practical from the very beginning and go coach” SHOWNOTES 1) Grant's origins in South Africa and work in school and professional settings 2) The value of working in user pay setting for S&C coaches 3) Generalists v specialists and should the name of S&C coaches be changed to perfo...

86 MINAPR 15
Comments
ASCA Podcast #34 - Grant Jenkins

ASCA Podcast #33 - Sally Bailey

Sally Bailey is a physical performance professional who has worked across the spectrum of athletic development from school-aged children to elite athletes in a range of individual and team sports. She is passionate about providing people with a real chance to engage with physical activity in the way they want to. Success comes in the form of happy faces striving to be their best. Sally has taken the lessons learnt through running a business and working with national and international level athletes and tailored her approach within a school environment. This has resulted in building athletic development and physical wellbeing programs from scratch in both a boys and girls school. QUOTES “Make sure it is about play” “Well-being is not an add on to the school curriculum - it is front and center of what we do” “The first question is why am I here (in a school)?” “The idea was to find 15 min 2-3 a week the boys in the whole school could do something to develop them physically” “All the things we do around high performance can be put into a school-based program but make sure there is a learning aspect to it” “You need to take the time to get to know the school and know what the school values” “Boys respond best in rules and structure whereas for girls, they like to be trusted” SHOWNOTES 1) Sally's origins and programming via snail mail for a national team 2) Her work with Brisbane Grammar and setting up a physical performance program in a school 3) How to manage the demands from different sports for student athletes 4) Making sure what we do is fun and has an element of game based play 5) The difference between boys and girls schools and performance vs. wellbeing programs 6) Answering the whys of working in a school program 7) Have an impact early and the top & tail strategy 8) The components of a complete wellness or performance program for a school 9) Logistics around a school day and working with student athletes whose main sport wasn’t a school sport or were involved in representative squads outside of school 10) Considerations with dealing with young female students (not just athletes) 11) What to do with a school that is a blank canvas and key differences with boys and girls People mentioned Vern Gambetta Ranell Hobson

61 MINMAR 20
Comments
ASCA Podcast #33 - Sally Bailey

ASCA Podcast #32 - Dr Paul Comfort

Dr Paul Comfort is a Reader in Strength and Conditioning at the University of Salford, UK, where he leads the Masters Degree in Strength and Conditioning and consults with numerous professional teams in the UK. Paul is a founder member and accredited member of the UKSCA, and part of their editorial board. He is a senior associate editor for the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research,and has authored / co-authored >100 peer reviewed journal articles, numerous book chapters and edited three textbooks. Quotes “No matter what you are trying to do, strength is going to underpin all athletic tasks” “You’re always going to do some power training (no matter how weak a person is) but you’ll get more bang for your buck when you are strong” “Jump height alone is not sensitive enough to identify any form of neuromuscular fatigue” “It can be pointless doing jump testing on a daily basis unless you can react to it” “I use every weightlifting derivative depending on athlete abili...

91 MINFEB 14
Comments
ASCA Podcast #32 - Dr Paul Comfort

ASCA Podcast #31 - Dr Tim Suchomel

Dr Suchomel is an assistant professor in the department of human movement sciences and strength and conditioning coach at Carroll University in Waukesha, Wisconsin, USA. Prior to Carroll University, Dr. Suchomel worked as an assistant strength and conditioning coach and sport scientist during his doctoral work at East Tennessee State University. He is a certified strength and conditioning specialist with distinction through the National Strength and Conditioning Association and a certified Sports Performance Coach through USA Weightlifting. QUOTES “There really isn’t a weightlifting derivative I don’t like” “It’s not just one maybe better than another, its how you load them… “ “Teaching an athlete how to land is one thing, teaching an athlete how to land with a load is another” “Athletes should be as strong as possible in the context of their sport” “Stronger individuals potentiated to a greater extent and faster than weaker individuals” SHOWNOTES 1) Dr Suchomel's jour...

91 MINJAN 31
Comments
ASCA Podcast #31 - Dr Tim Suchomel

Latest Episodes

ASCA Podcast #40 - Dr. Nick Winkelman

Nick Winkelman is the head of athletic performance & science for the Irish Rugby Football Union. His primary role is to oversee the delivery and development of strength & conditioning and sports science across all national (Men and Women | XV’s and 7’s) and provincial teams (Leinster, Munster, Connacht, and Ulster). Prior to working for Irish Rugby, Nick was the director of education and training systems for EXOS (formerly Athletes' Performance), located in Phoenix, AZ. As the director of education, Nick oversaw the development and execution of all internal and external educational initiatives. As a performance coach, Nick oversaw the speed and assessment component of the EXOS NFL Combine Development Program, and supported many athletes across the NFL, MLB, NBA, National Sport Organizations, and Military. Nick completed his PhD through Rocky Mountain University of Health Professions with a dissertation focus on motor skill learning and sprinting. Nick is an internationally recognized speaker on human performance and coaching science, and has multiple publications through the UKSCA, NSCA, IDEA Health and Fitness, Human Movement Science, and Routledge. Nick’s new book, The Language of Coaching, is scheduled to be released late 2019 by Human Kinetics. QUOTES “There is a ceiling effect with cueing expert performers” “The descriptive language of the WHAT is not the same as coaching language of the HOW” “The cue is matter of facilitating the last idea that goes into an athlete's head before they move” “How can you become a micro storyteller and wire that into your coaching?” “Every cue manifests as a thought and we have to take that responsibility for what that cue says” “How we train has immediate consequences on the thoughts we use when we perform” Show notes 1) Nick’s backstory from college to EXOS to the IRFU 2) The use of language to improve movement skill development and the research on different types of cues. 3) The effect of different cues on the retention of movement skills and psychological familiarity with cues 4) The Describe-Demo-Cue-Do-Debref loop 5) How to come up with cues that fit learning styles using the distance-direction-description paradigm 6) Analogies and inviting the athlete into the story 7) The difference between memory and attention and overloading athletes 8) Pain science and the words we use 9) Flow state, streaking and slumping PEOPLE MENTIONED Mark Vestergen Connor Gleadhill Rob Gray Barbara Tversky James Clear

74 MIN1 days ago
Comments
ASCA Podcast #40 - Dr. Nick Winkelman

ASCA Podcast #39 - John Mitchell and Stephen Bird PhD

The ASCA Board always works to ensure the ASCA provides the support Members and Coaches need to feel confident within their qualifications and standing in the sporting and strength and conditioning industry. Part of this was the development of the ASCA Professional Coach Accreditation Scheme (PCAS). The PCAS was primarily developed for the following reasons: - To recognise coaching experience in addition to education - Delineate the scope of the Strength and Conditioning professional - Create a structured mentoring network - Provide employers and ASCA members with a framework of job competencies and proposed remuneration schedules ASCA Board Member, John Mitchell, was instrumental in the development of the PCAS and has recently shared his experiences in both the industry and the development of the PCAS in a podcast with Dr Stephen Bird, ASCA inaugural Mentor Coach of the Year and Associate Editor of JASC. In this podcast Dr Bird and John Mitchell discuss the establishment of the PCA...

36 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
ASCA Podcast #39 - John Mitchell and Stephen Bird PhD

ASCA Podcast #38 - Jan Legg

Jan Legg has been the lead strength and conditioning coach for the Australian Women’s basketball team, the Opals since 2013 as well as the working with Basketball Australia’s development squad at the Centre of Excellence in Canberra. Jan is an Australian Strength and Conditioning Association (ASCA) accredited Level 3 and Master Pro-Structure coach at the Australian Institute of Sport in Canberra. QUOTES “All these basketball players have a dominant leg and what is an acceptable asymmetry? 10%? 15%? 20%?” “At least 1 to 2 warm ups a week will be barefoot” “Our athletes only have an offseason when they get hurt so my strength levels are all designed to make them robust enough and especially for female athletes we have to make sure the hamstrings are strong enough” “Most of the year I train full body” “Any rehabilitation should be making the overall athlete better than they were before” “While you are studying, volunteer your time and get to know people” SHOWNOTES 1) Jan's background in S&C 2) Benchmarking Physical standards for world class performances in womens basketball 3) Variability in jump kinematics over a season and how jump height does not tell complete story 4) How Jan's warm ups are structured and the benefits of barefoot work 5) What does a strength & conditioning session look like for an international level basketball 6) Programming ESD for court sports and considerations for tall heavy athletes 7) The AIS rehabilitation program 8) What did Jan learn on previous international study tours 9) Females in S&C, differences in coaching male and female athletes and career paths for any S&C coach PEOPLE MENTIONED John Mitchell Martin Bucheitt Matt Wenning Julian Jones Ross Smith

64 MINAUG 17
Comments
ASCA Podcast #38 - Jan Legg

ASCA Podcast #37 - Dr. Justin Keogh

Justin Keogh is an Associate Professor in the School of Health Sciences and Medicine, Bond University where he is the coordinator of the Masters of Sport Science program. He has taught into biomechanics, motor control and performance analysis subjects at an undergraduate and postgraduate level. His primary research interests focus on improving the transfer of strength and conditioning as well as skill-based training to sporting performance and/or reduced risk of injury. Current research projects and HDR supervision include Australian rules football, swimming, BMX, strongman and kettlebell projects. QUOTES “Heavy concentric work (eg sleds) are quite easy to recover from” “Doing work at long muscle lengths or with eccentric emphasis will increase fascicle length” “Research probably isn’t ever going to be able to answer every question S&C coaches will have so we need to use trial and error and our best guess” “The only thing that really matters is the transfer of the training we have our athletes do to the actual competition performance” SHOWNOTES 1) Justin's background and current role at Bond University 2) The application of research on strongman and powerlifting 3) Sled sprinting, motor learning and spinal loading 4) Donor sports for movement, decision-making and tactical improvements 5) Tapering practices for strength sport athletes 6) Posterior chain principles 7) How to combine eccentric and concentric focuses for athletes 8) Motor control learning concepts to maximise transfer 9) Overcoaching and verbal cues 10) Needs analysis and reverse engineering from game stats/KPIs PEOPLE MENTIONED Paul Winwood Lloyd Reynolds Jason Lake Stuart McGill Matt Rossiter Kelvin Giles Hayden Pricthard Tony Shield Dave Opar Daniel Chalkley David Watts Carl Woods Bob Alejo

100 MINJUL 25
Comments
ASCA Podcast #37 - Dr. Justin Keogh

ASCA Podcast #36 - Dr. Mark McKean

Mark has a PhD in Sport Science and is an ASCA Master Coach. Mark is Head of Physical Performance in High Performance Sport at University of the Sunshine Coast Lead working specifically with USC Spartans High Performance Swimming and Sunshine Coast Lightning Netball teams. QUOTES “We have to make sure we build capacity in their strength to allow them the capacity to do the work they need to do” “Perhaps the biggest challenge working with Paralympic athletes is overcoming the history of people being overly protective with them” “One of the things I still like to do is make sure the athletes have a good push:pull ratio in the upper body” “Since I started with the netballers all our work off court has been done off legs on bikes” “Netball is really a deceleration sport” “If your foot is in the air, you are going nowhere with change of direction” “One of the reasons why the coaches think we were able to run out games was we did less rather than more plyometrics in training” SHOWNOTES 1) Marks background as a PE teacher, trainer/strength coach and at USC 2) Training for paddling sports, internal strength versus external strength and tendon management 3) Swimming dry land work 4) Inspiratory muscle training 5) Paralympic Athletes considerations and overcoming challenges 6) Shoulder health, strength ratios in shoulder and tree climibing animal species 7) Working with netballers 8) COD principles and how to blend in agility 9) Testing and monitoring in court sports 10) Key strength lifts in gym for COD 11) Postural and movement screening 12) Managing tendon load and Mark's tickle 13) The value of post graduate work People mentioned Clint Robinson Adam Peaty Jan Prins Blake Cochran Craig Boettcher Tim Brown Kelvin GIles

90 MINJUN 20
Comments
ASCA Podcast #36 - Dr. Mark McKean

ASCA Podcast #35 - Dr. Jan Prins

Jan Prins has been involved in swimming coaching & research for more than 48 years. He is the director of the Aquatic Research Laboratory, and teaches Biomechanics, at the University of Hawaii. For the past 8 years he has been involved with unique swimming research using multiple, high-speed cameras examining the stroke mechanics of elite swimmers. Data collected from competitive swimmers, include Olympic, World champions, and former world record holders. Noting the need for “specificity” as applied to strength training for each respective sport, he continues to examine the applications of his research to improving dry-land programs for competitive swimmers. QUOTES “We are finding things that are very different to what the expectations are (of swimming coaches)” “Elite swimmers are not swimming with their elbows bent a lot” “Swimmers know instinctively that they should be moving fast on dry land” “Focus on the decelerators” “The bottom line is speed of body relative to the side of the pool” “Watch these things because of the research but don’t just do the one thing because the athletes will get fed up over the season” Show notes 1) Jan's background at Indiana and Hawaii as a swim coach and biomechanistic 2) High speed underwater multi-camera videography 3) The importance of measuring body segment velocity and impulse in swimming 4) The key takeaways from the biomechanical analysis and application to dryland training – i) straighter arms ii) lats and medial rotators iii) decelerators of elbow iv) wrist flexors 5) The four aspects of specificity for any sports training 6) The importance of wrist and finger strength and being able to hold that in the water 7) Why you can’t just focus on the “best” exercises for swimming all year round 8) Closed chain pulling and being aware of relative speeds of the body to the side of pool and the arms to thebody 9) The application of Jan's research to Paralympic swimmers 10) Use of hydrotherapy and aquatic physical therapy and how to apply to other athletes People mentioned James Counselman Mark Spitz James Magnussen Emily Seebohm Mack Horton Matt Brown Dennis Cotterill

59 MINMAY 18
Comments
ASCA Podcast #35 - Dr. Jan Prins

ASCA Podcast #34 - Grant Jenkins

With almost 20 years of coaching under his belt, Grant is a proud to be ASCA Master Coach. He is the director of PropelPerform, a high performance training facility that also consults and contracts to schools, clubs, State and National Sporting Organisations. At the moment, most of his athletes compete in action/extreme sports. QUOTES “There are two types of coaches: those that are fired and those about to be fired” “Part of that process of us maturing as coaches is we start to see more and more grey” “I want your theoretical knowledge to be no more than 10% above your practical knowledge” “Sometimes it is better to talk in black and white rather than in grey, especially with novices” “Let’s get practical from the very beginning and go coach” SHOWNOTES 1) Grant's origins in South Africa and work in school and professional settings 2) The value of working in user pay setting for S&C coaches 3) Generalists v specialists and should the name of S&C coaches be changed to perfo...

86 MINAPR 15
Comments
ASCA Podcast #34 - Grant Jenkins

ASCA Podcast #33 - Sally Bailey

Sally Bailey is a physical performance professional who has worked across the spectrum of athletic development from school-aged children to elite athletes in a range of individual and team sports. She is passionate about providing people with a real chance to engage with physical activity in the way they want to. Success comes in the form of happy faces striving to be their best. Sally has taken the lessons learnt through running a business and working with national and international level athletes and tailored her approach within a school environment. This has resulted in building athletic development and physical wellbeing programs from scratch in both a boys and girls school. QUOTES “Make sure it is about play” “Well-being is not an add on to the school curriculum - it is front and center of what we do” “The first question is why am I here (in a school)?” “The idea was to find 15 min 2-3 a week the boys in the whole school could do something to develop them physically” “All the things we do around high performance can be put into a school-based program but make sure there is a learning aspect to it” “You need to take the time to get to know the school and know what the school values” “Boys respond best in rules and structure whereas for girls, they like to be trusted” SHOWNOTES 1) Sally's origins and programming via snail mail for a national team 2) Her work with Brisbane Grammar and setting up a physical performance program in a school 3) How to manage the demands from different sports for student athletes 4) Making sure what we do is fun and has an element of game based play 5) The difference between boys and girls schools and performance vs. wellbeing programs 6) Answering the whys of working in a school program 7) Have an impact early and the top & tail strategy 8) The components of a complete wellness or performance program for a school 9) Logistics around a school day and working with student athletes whose main sport wasn’t a school sport or were involved in representative squads outside of school 10) Considerations with dealing with young female students (not just athletes) 11) What to do with a school that is a blank canvas and key differences with boys and girls People mentioned Vern Gambetta Ranell Hobson

61 MINMAR 20
Comments
ASCA Podcast #33 - Sally Bailey

ASCA Podcast #32 - Dr Paul Comfort

Dr Paul Comfort is a Reader in Strength and Conditioning at the University of Salford, UK, where he leads the Masters Degree in Strength and Conditioning and consults with numerous professional teams in the UK. Paul is a founder member and accredited member of the UKSCA, and part of their editorial board. He is a senior associate editor for the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research,and has authored / co-authored >100 peer reviewed journal articles, numerous book chapters and edited three textbooks. Quotes “No matter what you are trying to do, strength is going to underpin all athletic tasks” “You’re always going to do some power training (no matter how weak a person is) but you’ll get more bang for your buck when you are strong” “Jump height alone is not sensitive enough to identify any form of neuromuscular fatigue” “It can be pointless doing jump testing on a daily basis unless you can react to it” “I use every weightlifting derivative depending on athlete abili...

91 MINFEB 14
Comments
ASCA Podcast #32 - Dr Paul Comfort

ASCA Podcast #31 - Dr Tim Suchomel

Dr Suchomel is an assistant professor in the department of human movement sciences and strength and conditioning coach at Carroll University in Waukesha, Wisconsin, USA. Prior to Carroll University, Dr. Suchomel worked as an assistant strength and conditioning coach and sport scientist during his doctoral work at East Tennessee State University. He is a certified strength and conditioning specialist with distinction through the National Strength and Conditioning Association and a certified Sports Performance Coach through USA Weightlifting. QUOTES “There really isn’t a weightlifting derivative I don’t like” “It’s not just one maybe better than another, its how you load them… “ “Teaching an athlete how to land is one thing, teaching an athlete how to land with a load is another” “Athletes should be as strong as possible in the context of their sport” “Stronger individuals potentiated to a greater extent and faster than weaker individuals” SHOWNOTES 1) Dr Suchomel's jour...

91 MINJAN 31
Comments
ASCA Podcast #31 - Dr Tim Suchomel

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