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Flicks with The Film Snob

Chris Dashiell

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Flicks with The Film Snob
Flicks with The Film Snob

Flicks with The Film Snob

Chris Dashiell

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About Us

Flicks with The Film Snob features a weekly film review focused on new independent releases and old classics. Chris Dashiell knows film, and he knows enough to know what’s worth watching and why. Produced in Tucson Arizona at KXCI Community Radio.

Latest Episodes

Linda Ronstadt: the Sound of My Voice

There’s a new documentary film about a popular singer who was born and raised in my current home town of Tucson, Arizona: Linda Ronstadt. The movie is called Linda Ronstadt: The Sound of My Voice. After a brief intro presenting the arc of her career, the film explores Ronstadt’s childhood and youth, with Linda herself telling how her Michigan-born mother, daughter of a great inventor, went to the University of Arizona in Tucson where she met Linda’s father, the son of a cattle rancher and musician whose own father had come to Tucson in the 19th century from Mexico. Linda’s father, who later became a prominent local merchant, loved singing Mexican folk songs, and serenaded her mother when he courted her. Their four children, of whom Linda was the youngest, were raised in a household immersed in music. In addition to the Mexican influence (in the film Linda says that as a child she thought Spanish was a language used only in singing), her mother loved the popular American standards and

4 MIN4 days ago
Comments
Linda Ronstadt: the Sound of My Voice

Non-Fiction

Olivier Assayas portrays the complex and somewhat devious relationships of a group of Parisian literary types, in a film that poses questions about traditional culture, and the digital world that is threatening to supplant it. The latest offering from prolific French director Olivier Assayas bears the ironic title Non-Fiction, even though it is a fictional portrait of intertwined relationships. It opens with a meeting between a scruffy middle-aged novelist, Léonard Spiegel, played by Vincent Macaigne, and his editor, Alain Danielson, an erudite, genial intellectual played by Guillaume Canet. Alain’s company has published all of Léonard’s novels up until now, but he’s not too happy with the latest one, which he considers just more of the same. Léonard has a tendency of putting actual events and people from his personal life, and his sexual affairs in particular, into his novels, and often in transparent ways. His latest is no exception, but now this habit is getting negative at...

4 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
Non-Fiction

Where’d You Go, Bernadette

Cate Blanchett shines in Richard Linklater’s adaptation of a popular novel about a brilliant, difficult woman having trouble adjusting to domestic life. One of the things you’ll notice about films that are directed by Richard Linklater is that the characters like to talk. They talk about themselves and their lives, but also about issues and ideas. Even his one “action” film, The Newton Boys, from way back in ’98, has more dialogue than the average movie about bank robbers. In case you were wondering, I like this about him. I like how he values thinking, intelligence, and self-awareness as context for his comedies and dramas, and I think it makes him stand out from the crowd in this respect. His latest film is called Where’d You Go, Bernadette. It’s adapted by Linklater, with Holly Gent and Vincent Palmo, Jr., from a bestselling novel by Maria Semple. The title character, Bernadette Fox, is a genius architect who has retreated from the limelight after some setbacks in L.A., and i

4 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
Where’d You Go, Bernadette

Safety Last!

This 1923 thrill comedy, climaxing in a famous climb up a skyscraper, shows silent comedian Harold Lloyd at his very best. There are three names considered the greatest and most important in American silent film comedy. Number one is Charlie Chaplin, one of the first superstars in modern history, whose beloved character of the little tramp delighted the world while symbolizing a kind of rebellion against a society ruled by the pompous rich. The second is Buster Keaton, with his deadpan expression and endlessly amazing spectacles and stunts—he became more popular, a legend in fact, long after his career had effectively ended than he was at that time. The third name may not be as well known to you: Harold Lloyd. Lloyd started out as a Chaplin imitator, with a mustache and a silly outfit. But then he put on a pair of big horn-rimmed glasses and a straw hat, and turned into an American everyman, a person about which the audience might think, “Oh, that could be me!” Fan magazine polls...

4 MIN3 weeks ago
Comments
Safety Last!

The Farewell

A Chinese-American family goes to China to visit the grandmother who is dying, but no one has told her the truth of her condition, in this tender comedy of grief and family. The premise of The Farewell, the second feature from writer/director Lulu Wang, is fairly simple. Billi, a young Chinese American woman, is told by her parents that her grandmother in China, whom she calls Nai Nai, has been diagnosed with a fatal cancer and has only a few months to live. The catch is that no one has told Nai Nai this fact. It is the social custom in Chinese families to keep this knowledge from a family member, in order not to distress her, but in effect take the suffering on their own shoulders instead. And now the American branch of the family will visit China on the pretense of celebrating a hastily arranged marriage of one of Billi’s cousins, but with the real motive of having one last time to see their beloved grandmother. If you saw the previews you might get the impression that this premise

4 MINAUG 20
Comments
The Farewell

The Dead Don’t Die

Jim Jarmusch has crafted a zombie film—a comedy that somehow manages to maintain an almost somber tone—doubling as a portrait of America under Trump. Jim Jarmusch still seems, at least to me, like the daring young innovator of independent film, even though he’s been writing and directing movies for almost forty years. He makes the films he wants to make, without compromise and without interference, and consequently his body of work stands almost alone in the American cinematic landscape, as the vision of one artist. He sometimes likes to adopt a well-known film genre and create a picture that ends up being completely atypical of that genre, for instance, Dead Man, back in ’95, was a western unlike any other you’ve ever seen, and recently in 2013, Only Lovers Left Alive was a vampire film that even I, who generally don’t like vampire films, admired and reviewed on this show. And now, for reasons which will become clear, he’s made a zombie film called The Dead Don’t Die. The s...

4 MINAUG 13
Comments
The Dead Don’t Die

Sunset

In 1913 Budapest, a young woman searches relentlessly for the secrets of her own family, in a film that dramatizes a premonition of the old European world’s collapse. How small an individual seems in the modern era—how insignificant seem the hopes and dreams of one person, dwarfed by gigantic events. By the modern era I mean the last century or so. There have been in that century two world wars—the very idea of a world war would have been considered unthinkable earlier—followed by the awful capability of destroying the human race with nuclear weapons, and now the threat of environmental catastrophe. Powerlessness in this case is a symptom of our historical perception. A person lives his or her life as always—but in our awareness of the vast scope of events in modern times we experience this sense of smallness. Hungarian director LászlóNemes feels this acutely, and puts a spotlight on it in his latest film, Sunset. As the movie opens, we are in Budapest in 1913, watching a young

4 MINAUG 7
Comments
Sunset

In the Aisles

Life on the job—in this case, the night shift at a supermarket box store—forms the background of German director Thomas Stuber’s gentle drama of love and friendship. Most of us spend close to half of our waking adult lives at work, but I would venture to guess that less than five percent of narrative films take work as their subject. And it’s easy to see why—we seek drama and excitement at the movies, and our jobs don’t usually offer that. They’re repetitive and regular, and on film one would think it would be boring. Still, there’s a largely unexplored trove of experience begging for artistic treatment. German director Thomas Stuber has met that challenge with his second feature, In the Aisles. The picture opens in a mood of mellow humor. The strains of Strauss’s The Blue Danube play over shots of motorized pallets and forklifts gliding through the aisles of a big supermarket box store. Ironic echoes from 2001: A Space Odyssey are perhaps intentional. It turns out that the...

3 MINJUL 31
Comments
In the Aisles

Midsommar

Ari Aster’s latest horror film depicts a group of young Americans encountering a strange pagan community in Sweden. In last year’s horror film stand-out Hereditary, director Ari Astor explored the darkness of an abusive family history. Now in his latest film, Midsommar, the horror takes place in full daylight, in a world of sunshine and flowers that is more sinister precisely because of the absence of shadows. As the film begins, Dani, a young American graduate student played by Florence Pugh, suffers an unspeakable family tragedy involving her parents and bipolar sister. In a time of shock and grief she leans on her boyfriend Christian, played by Jack Reynor, and he’s there to hold her as she cries. But some time later, she learns that he’s agreed to go to Sweden for a few months, on the invitation of a friend in the anthropology department named Pelle, whose family is from Halsingland, in the northern part of that country. Pelle has invited another friend, Josh, working on a P

4 MINJUL 24
Comments
Midsommar

The Last Black Man in San Francisco

A young black man yearns to reclaim the old San Francisco house that he grew up in, but which his father lost, in this film about home, friendship, and the city by the Bay. A new film tells a beautiful, tender story about a house and a friendship. It’s director Joe Talbot’s first feature, entitled The Last Black Man in San Francisco. The tale concerns a young African American man named Jimmie Fails, who plays a version of himself in the film, and who dreamed up this story with his old friend Talbot when they were teens. How much of it is strictly autobiographical I don’t know, but the fact that Fails has the same name as his character tells us that this is an intimate personal film. Jimmie grew up in a beautiful old house in San Francisco, with an ornate Victorian architectural style that includes a little tower topped with a roof in the shape of a witch’s hat, as they call it in the film. His father, a bit of a shady character, lost the house somehow, and now Jimmie comes and g...

3 MINJUL 18
Comments
The Last Black Man in San Francisco

Latest Episodes

Linda Ronstadt: the Sound of My Voice

There’s a new documentary film about a popular singer who was born and raised in my current home town of Tucson, Arizona: Linda Ronstadt. The movie is called Linda Ronstadt: The Sound of My Voice. After a brief intro presenting the arc of her career, the film explores Ronstadt’s childhood and youth, with Linda herself telling how her Michigan-born mother, daughter of a great inventor, went to the University of Arizona in Tucson where she met Linda’s father, the son of a cattle rancher and musician whose own father had come to Tucson in the 19th century from Mexico. Linda’s father, who later became a prominent local merchant, loved singing Mexican folk songs, and serenaded her mother when he courted her. Their four children, of whom Linda was the youngest, were raised in a household immersed in music. In addition to the Mexican influence (in the film Linda says that as a child she thought Spanish was a language used only in singing), her mother loved the popular American standards and

4 MIN4 days ago
Comments
Linda Ronstadt: the Sound of My Voice

Non-Fiction

Olivier Assayas portrays the complex and somewhat devious relationships of a group of Parisian literary types, in a film that poses questions about traditional culture, and the digital world that is threatening to supplant it. The latest offering from prolific French director Olivier Assayas bears the ironic title Non-Fiction, even though it is a fictional portrait of intertwined relationships. It opens with a meeting between a scruffy middle-aged novelist, Léonard Spiegel, played by Vincent Macaigne, and his editor, Alain Danielson, an erudite, genial intellectual played by Guillaume Canet. Alain’s company has published all of Léonard’s novels up until now, but he’s not too happy with the latest one, which he considers just more of the same. Léonard has a tendency of putting actual events and people from his personal life, and his sexual affairs in particular, into his novels, and often in transparent ways. His latest is no exception, but now this habit is getting negative at...

4 MIN1 weeks ago
Comments
Non-Fiction

Where’d You Go, Bernadette

Cate Blanchett shines in Richard Linklater’s adaptation of a popular novel about a brilliant, difficult woman having trouble adjusting to domestic life. One of the things you’ll notice about films that are directed by Richard Linklater is that the characters like to talk. They talk about themselves and their lives, but also about issues and ideas. Even his one “action” film, The Newton Boys, from way back in ’98, has more dialogue than the average movie about bank robbers. In case you were wondering, I like this about him. I like how he values thinking, intelligence, and self-awareness as context for his comedies and dramas, and I think it makes him stand out from the crowd in this respect. His latest film is called Where’d You Go, Bernadette. It’s adapted by Linklater, with Holly Gent and Vincent Palmo, Jr., from a bestselling novel by Maria Semple. The title character, Bernadette Fox, is a genius architect who has retreated from the limelight after some setbacks in L.A., and i

4 MIN2 weeks ago
Comments
Where’d You Go, Bernadette

Safety Last!

This 1923 thrill comedy, climaxing in a famous climb up a skyscraper, shows silent comedian Harold Lloyd at his very best. There are three names considered the greatest and most important in American silent film comedy. Number one is Charlie Chaplin, one of the first superstars in modern history, whose beloved character of the little tramp delighted the world while symbolizing a kind of rebellion against a society ruled by the pompous rich. The second is Buster Keaton, with his deadpan expression and endlessly amazing spectacles and stunts—he became more popular, a legend in fact, long after his career had effectively ended than he was at that time. The third name may not be as well known to you: Harold Lloyd. Lloyd started out as a Chaplin imitator, with a mustache and a silly outfit. But then he put on a pair of big horn-rimmed glasses and a straw hat, and turned into an American everyman, a person about which the audience might think, “Oh, that could be me!” Fan magazine polls...

4 MIN3 weeks ago
Comments
Safety Last!

The Farewell

A Chinese-American family goes to China to visit the grandmother who is dying, but no one has told her the truth of her condition, in this tender comedy of grief and family. The premise of The Farewell, the second feature from writer/director Lulu Wang, is fairly simple. Billi, a young Chinese American woman, is told by her parents that her grandmother in China, whom she calls Nai Nai, has been diagnosed with a fatal cancer and has only a few months to live. The catch is that no one has told Nai Nai this fact. It is the social custom in Chinese families to keep this knowledge from a family member, in order not to distress her, but in effect take the suffering on their own shoulders instead. And now the American branch of the family will visit China on the pretense of celebrating a hastily arranged marriage of one of Billi’s cousins, but with the real motive of having one last time to see their beloved grandmother. If you saw the previews you might get the impression that this premise

4 MINAUG 20
Comments
The Farewell

The Dead Don’t Die

Jim Jarmusch has crafted a zombie film—a comedy that somehow manages to maintain an almost somber tone—doubling as a portrait of America under Trump. Jim Jarmusch still seems, at least to me, like the daring young innovator of independent film, even though he’s been writing and directing movies for almost forty years. He makes the films he wants to make, without compromise and without interference, and consequently his body of work stands almost alone in the American cinematic landscape, as the vision of one artist. He sometimes likes to adopt a well-known film genre and create a picture that ends up being completely atypical of that genre, for instance, Dead Man, back in ’95, was a western unlike any other you’ve ever seen, and recently in 2013, Only Lovers Left Alive was a vampire film that even I, who generally don’t like vampire films, admired and reviewed on this show. And now, for reasons which will become clear, he’s made a zombie film called The Dead Don’t Die. The s...

4 MINAUG 13
Comments
The Dead Don’t Die

Sunset

In 1913 Budapest, a young woman searches relentlessly for the secrets of her own family, in a film that dramatizes a premonition of the old European world’s collapse. How small an individual seems in the modern era—how insignificant seem the hopes and dreams of one person, dwarfed by gigantic events. By the modern era I mean the last century or so. There have been in that century two world wars—the very idea of a world war would have been considered unthinkable earlier—followed by the awful capability of destroying the human race with nuclear weapons, and now the threat of environmental catastrophe. Powerlessness in this case is a symptom of our historical perception. A person lives his or her life as always—but in our awareness of the vast scope of events in modern times we experience this sense of smallness. Hungarian director LászlóNemes feels this acutely, and puts a spotlight on it in his latest film, Sunset. As the movie opens, we are in Budapest in 1913, watching a young

4 MINAUG 7
Comments
Sunset

In the Aisles

Life on the job—in this case, the night shift at a supermarket box store—forms the background of German director Thomas Stuber’s gentle drama of love and friendship. Most of us spend close to half of our waking adult lives at work, but I would venture to guess that less than five percent of narrative films take work as their subject. And it’s easy to see why—we seek drama and excitement at the movies, and our jobs don’t usually offer that. They’re repetitive and regular, and on film one would think it would be boring. Still, there’s a largely unexplored trove of experience begging for artistic treatment. German director Thomas Stuber has met that challenge with his second feature, In the Aisles. The picture opens in a mood of mellow humor. The strains of Strauss’s The Blue Danube play over shots of motorized pallets and forklifts gliding through the aisles of a big supermarket box store. Ironic echoes from 2001: A Space Odyssey are perhaps intentional. It turns out that the...

3 MINJUL 31
Comments
In the Aisles

Midsommar

Ari Aster’s latest horror film depicts a group of young Americans encountering a strange pagan community in Sweden. In last year’s horror film stand-out Hereditary, director Ari Astor explored the darkness of an abusive family history. Now in his latest film, Midsommar, the horror takes place in full daylight, in a world of sunshine and flowers that is more sinister precisely because of the absence of shadows. As the film begins, Dani, a young American graduate student played by Florence Pugh, suffers an unspeakable family tragedy involving her parents and bipolar sister. In a time of shock and grief she leans on her boyfriend Christian, played by Jack Reynor, and he’s there to hold her as she cries. But some time later, she learns that he’s agreed to go to Sweden for a few months, on the invitation of a friend in the anthropology department named Pelle, whose family is from Halsingland, in the northern part of that country. Pelle has invited another friend, Josh, working on a P

4 MINJUL 24
Comments
Midsommar

The Last Black Man in San Francisco

A young black man yearns to reclaim the old San Francisco house that he grew up in, but which his father lost, in this film about home, friendship, and the city by the Bay. A new film tells a beautiful, tender story about a house and a friendship. It’s director Joe Talbot’s first feature, entitled The Last Black Man in San Francisco. The tale concerns a young African American man named Jimmie Fails, who plays a version of himself in the film, and who dreamed up this story with his old friend Talbot when they were teens. How much of it is strictly autobiographical I don’t know, but the fact that Fails has the same name as his character tells us that this is an intimate personal film. Jimmie grew up in a beautiful old house in San Francisco, with an ornate Victorian architectural style that includes a little tower topped with a roof in the shape of a witch’s hat, as they call it in the film. His father, a bit of a shady character, lost the house somehow, and now Jimmie comes and g...

3 MINJUL 18
Comments
The Last Black Man in San Francisco