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Sheffield Doc/Fest Podcast

Sheffield Doc/Fest

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Sheffield Doc/Fest Podcast
Sheffield Doc/Fest Podcast

Sheffield Doc/Fest Podcast

Sheffield Doc/Fest

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About Us

Sheffield Doc/Fest is a world leading and the UK’s premier documentary festival, celebrating the art and business of documentary.We’re a hub for all documentary and factual content across all platforms, from feature length to shorts, and including interactive and virtual reality projects. www.sheffdocfest.com

Latest Episodes

Vicky McClure: Dementia & Music

We welcomed BAFTA-winning actor Vicky McClure, star of This is England (produced by Sheffield based Warp Films), as well as Line of Duty and Broadchurch, to Sheffield Doc/Fest for the first time in 2018, to discuss her new BBC series, Vicky McClure: My Dementia Choir, produced by Curve, a deeply personal journey to discover the extent of music's power to fight dementia. For the series, Nottingham born Vicky, who has close personal experience of dementia through caring for her grandmother, joined forces with the University of Nottingham to form a unique choir for one unforgettable performance. Vicky discusses the making of the programmes, her role with the Alzheimer's Society and the ambition to leave a lasting legacy in our understanding of how music therapy can help people with dementia. Supported by BBC

42 MINMAY 24
Comments
Vicky McClure: Dementia & Music

Brian Reed & Richard Miron in Conversation

Brian Reed (Host and co-creator of S-Town) and Richard Miron (Director/Producer of For the Birds) explore the real life mysteries and strange tales that inspired their work. Chaired by Lyndon Saunders (University of Salford). This talk was part of the 2018 Doc/Fest Exchange: Head Space programme of special talks, films and activity, with a focus on mental health, supported by Wellcome.

43 MINMAY 10
Comments
Brian Reed & Richard Miron in Conversation

Whose Story: Authentic Voices in Storytelling

From the Syrian conflict to Black Lives Matter; now more than ever there is an urgency for stories told by less represented and authentic voices emerging from affected communities. Getting access to a community not your own, to spend a few days filming on the ground, is widely considered ‘extractive’ storytelling. Can extended integration with protagonists truly embed a filmmaker with their subject's experience? What does it take to tell an ‘authentic’ story? A panel of filmmakers at Sheffield Doc/Fest 2018 share their own experiences of extractive vs authentic storytelling. Chaired by Anca Dimofte (Frontline Club) with filmmakers Molly Dineen, Leon Oldstrong and Deeyah Khan. Filmed by Sheffield Hallam University students and edited by Matthew Sturdy (Cosmic Joke).

44 MINAPR 5
Comments
Whose Story: Authentic Voices in Storytelling

Times Up: The Industry Response to Bullying & Harassment

Allegations against Harvey Weinstein and numerous others exposed a deeply troubling side to the film and TV industry. Following the birth of the ground-breaking anti-sexual assault and women's empowerment movements #MeToo and #TimesUp, we debate how the industry is responding. Chaired by Natasha Moore (Directors UK) with Tim Hunter (BAFTA), Jane Merkin, Billie JD Porter, Natasha Dack (Tigerlily) and Fiona Campbell (BBC). Supported by Directors UK

51 MINMAR 22
Comments
Times Up: The Industry Response to Bullying & Harassment

The BBC Interview: Mary Beard

One of our favourite talks from the 2018 festival: Charlotte Moore, Director of Content at the BBC, interviews public intellectual, feminist, author and television presenter Mary Beard. In her trademark accessible style, Britain's best-known classicist discusses her broadcasting career as well as her most recent book, Women & Power: A Manifesto, hailed as a modern feminist classic.

57 MINMAR 8
Comments
The BBC Interview: Mary Beard

Documenting Grenfell: a Problem in Plain Sight?

In 2017 the Grenfell Tower tragedy shook the nation: claims of gross negligence, government cuts, and lack of political action angered communities, and the demand for justice and call for change began. For many the tragedy highlighted the deep divide in society, and a local story missed by the media elite disconnected from the ‘real world’. A panel of journalists, filmmakers and activists from Sheffield Doc/Fest 2018 discuss their own responses to disaster. The panel is chaired by Siobhan Sinnerton (Channel 4) with Jonathan Rudd (Parable), Simon Hattenstone (Guardian) and Nendie Pinto-Duschinsky.

53 MINFEB 22
Comments
Documenting Grenfell: a Problem in Plain Sight?

Poverty in the UK: New Approaches to Storytelling

Poverty in the UK is increasing for the first time in two decades. We are seeing more people struggling to make ends meet. Does television set out accurately the complexities of living in poverty, or too crudely as either a deserving economic victim or undeserving ‘scrounger’? How can we tell more accurate stories of poverty to skeptical audiences, for a fuller debate and actions? A panel from Sheffield Doc/Fest 2018 debate these questions and more. Chaired by Poppy Noor (The Guardian) with the writer Jack Monroe, the filmmakers Mark Raphael and Daisy-May Hudson and Chief Executive of the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, Campbell Robb. Supported by JRF and Guardian

55 MINFEB 8
Comments
Poverty in the UK: New Approaches to Storytelling

Jamal Edwards MBE: SBTV, Music & Mental Health

Britain's hottest young entrepreneur Jamal Edwards, founded YouTube-based SBTV in 2006 with a self-recorded grainy rap battle. Now hailed as one of the most important digital youth culture platforms, SBTV boasts over 950,000 subscribers and 600+ million views and has launched the careers of countless UK grime and hip-hop artists. On a mission to break the stigma around mental illness, Jamal talks to Jolyon Rubinstein (The Revolution Will Be Televised) about his influential career, his recent documentary exploring mental health and his future plans for SBTV and beyond.

39 MINJAN 25
Comments
Jamal Edwards MBE: SBTV, Music & Mental Health

Craft Summit 2018: Documentary Subjects How Close Do You Go

This interactive and probing session uses the experience of a psychologist to gain insight into the art of directing actuality, the portrayal of character and examine whether we can ever get too close to the subject in documentaries. Moderated by Krishan Arora with Sean Mcallister, Bernadett Tuza-Ritter, Geoff Beattie and Stephen Arnott. Part of the 2018 Craft Summit at Sheffield Doc/Fest presented by Documentary Campus. Visit our website: sheffdocfest.com

38 MINJAN 11
Comments
Craft Summit 2018: Documentary Subjects How Close Do You Go

Khalik Allah: Exploring a New Film Language

Self-taught photographer and filmmaker, Khalik Allah's profoundly personal work has been described as "street opera"; visceral, haunting and honest. Having previously worked with Wu-Tang Clan and Mobb Deep, Khalik's feature debut Field Niggas, garnered critical acclaim from the cultural press and his follow up Black Mother received its UK premier at Sheffield Doc/Fest. Khalik talks to film programmer Ashley Clark, about his work as an artist and the creation of a unique and daring film language and aesthetic.

51 MIN2018 DEC 7
Comments
Khalik Allah: Exploring a New Film Language

Latest Episodes

Vicky McClure: Dementia & Music

We welcomed BAFTA-winning actor Vicky McClure, star of This is England (produced by Sheffield based Warp Films), as well as Line of Duty and Broadchurch, to Sheffield Doc/Fest for the first time in 2018, to discuss her new BBC series, Vicky McClure: My Dementia Choir, produced by Curve, a deeply personal journey to discover the extent of music's power to fight dementia. For the series, Nottingham born Vicky, who has close personal experience of dementia through caring for her grandmother, joined forces with the University of Nottingham to form a unique choir for one unforgettable performance. Vicky discusses the making of the programmes, her role with the Alzheimer's Society and the ambition to leave a lasting legacy in our understanding of how music therapy can help people with dementia. Supported by BBC

42 MINMAY 24
Comments
Vicky McClure: Dementia & Music

Brian Reed & Richard Miron in Conversation

Brian Reed (Host and co-creator of S-Town) and Richard Miron (Director/Producer of For the Birds) explore the real life mysteries and strange tales that inspired their work. Chaired by Lyndon Saunders (University of Salford). This talk was part of the 2018 Doc/Fest Exchange: Head Space programme of special talks, films and activity, with a focus on mental health, supported by Wellcome.

43 MINMAY 10
Comments
Brian Reed & Richard Miron in Conversation

Whose Story: Authentic Voices in Storytelling

From the Syrian conflict to Black Lives Matter; now more than ever there is an urgency for stories told by less represented and authentic voices emerging from affected communities. Getting access to a community not your own, to spend a few days filming on the ground, is widely considered ‘extractive’ storytelling. Can extended integration with protagonists truly embed a filmmaker with their subject's experience? What does it take to tell an ‘authentic’ story? A panel of filmmakers at Sheffield Doc/Fest 2018 share their own experiences of extractive vs authentic storytelling. Chaired by Anca Dimofte (Frontline Club) with filmmakers Molly Dineen, Leon Oldstrong and Deeyah Khan. Filmed by Sheffield Hallam University students and edited by Matthew Sturdy (Cosmic Joke).

44 MINAPR 5
Comments
Whose Story: Authentic Voices in Storytelling

Times Up: The Industry Response to Bullying & Harassment

Allegations against Harvey Weinstein and numerous others exposed a deeply troubling side to the film and TV industry. Following the birth of the ground-breaking anti-sexual assault and women's empowerment movements #MeToo and #TimesUp, we debate how the industry is responding. Chaired by Natasha Moore (Directors UK) with Tim Hunter (BAFTA), Jane Merkin, Billie JD Porter, Natasha Dack (Tigerlily) and Fiona Campbell (BBC). Supported by Directors UK

51 MINMAR 22
Comments
Times Up: The Industry Response to Bullying & Harassment

The BBC Interview: Mary Beard

One of our favourite talks from the 2018 festival: Charlotte Moore, Director of Content at the BBC, interviews public intellectual, feminist, author and television presenter Mary Beard. In her trademark accessible style, Britain's best-known classicist discusses her broadcasting career as well as her most recent book, Women & Power: A Manifesto, hailed as a modern feminist classic.

57 MINMAR 8
Comments
The BBC Interview: Mary Beard

Documenting Grenfell: a Problem in Plain Sight?

In 2017 the Grenfell Tower tragedy shook the nation: claims of gross negligence, government cuts, and lack of political action angered communities, and the demand for justice and call for change began. For many the tragedy highlighted the deep divide in society, and a local story missed by the media elite disconnected from the ‘real world’. A panel of journalists, filmmakers and activists from Sheffield Doc/Fest 2018 discuss their own responses to disaster. The panel is chaired by Siobhan Sinnerton (Channel 4) with Jonathan Rudd (Parable), Simon Hattenstone (Guardian) and Nendie Pinto-Duschinsky.

53 MINFEB 22
Comments
Documenting Grenfell: a Problem in Plain Sight?

Poverty in the UK: New Approaches to Storytelling

Poverty in the UK is increasing for the first time in two decades. We are seeing more people struggling to make ends meet. Does television set out accurately the complexities of living in poverty, or too crudely as either a deserving economic victim or undeserving ‘scrounger’? How can we tell more accurate stories of poverty to skeptical audiences, for a fuller debate and actions? A panel from Sheffield Doc/Fest 2018 debate these questions and more. Chaired by Poppy Noor (The Guardian) with the writer Jack Monroe, the filmmakers Mark Raphael and Daisy-May Hudson and Chief Executive of the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, Campbell Robb. Supported by JRF and Guardian

55 MINFEB 8
Comments
Poverty in the UK: New Approaches to Storytelling

Jamal Edwards MBE: SBTV, Music & Mental Health

Britain's hottest young entrepreneur Jamal Edwards, founded YouTube-based SBTV in 2006 with a self-recorded grainy rap battle. Now hailed as one of the most important digital youth culture platforms, SBTV boasts over 950,000 subscribers and 600+ million views and has launched the careers of countless UK grime and hip-hop artists. On a mission to break the stigma around mental illness, Jamal talks to Jolyon Rubinstein (The Revolution Will Be Televised) about his influential career, his recent documentary exploring mental health and his future plans for SBTV and beyond.

39 MINJAN 25
Comments
Jamal Edwards MBE: SBTV, Music & Mental Health

Craft Summit 2018: Documentary Subjects How Close Do You Go

This interactive and probing session uses the experience of a psychologist to gain insight into the art of directing actuality, the portrayal of character and examine whether we can ever get too close to the subject in documentaries. Moderated by Krishan Arora with Sean Mcallister, Bernadett Tuza-Ritter, Geoff Beattie and Stephen Arnott. Part of the 2018 Craft Summit at Sheffield Doc/Fest presented by Documentary Campus. Visit our website: sheffdocfest.com

38 MINJAN 11
Comments
Craft Summit 2018: Documentary Subjects How Close Do You Go

Khalik Allah: Exploring a New Film Language

Self-taught photographer and filmmaker, Khalik Allah's profoundly personal work has been described as "street opera"; visceral, haunting and honest. Having previously worked with Wu-Tang Clan and Mobb Deep, Khalik's feature debut Field Niggas, garnered critical acclaim from the cultural press and his follow up Black Mother received its UK premier at Sheffield Doc/Fest. Khalik talks to film programmer Ashley Clark, about his work as an artist and the creation of a unique and daring film language and aesthetic.

51 MIN2018 DEC 7
Comments
Khalik Allah: Exploring a New Film Language