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What Did We Miss?

What Did We Miss? Podcast

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What Did We Miss?
What Did We Miss?

What Did We Miss?

What Did We Miss? Podcast

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Join hosts Tony and Matt as they resolve their pop culture blindspots, one podcast at a time.

Latest Episodes

Archie Comics with Ayla Ahlquist

EDespite recognizing the characters, Matt and Tony have never read a single Archie comic book. This week they fix that by sitting down with classic tales of teenage antics as drawn by Dan DeCarlo, the Archie artist who established the house style and solidified the characters' iconic looks. Joining them is Ayla Ahlquist, a Providence-based comedy writer and performer who was raised on the adventures of the Archie gang. Ayla regularly performs improv comedy at Wage House Comedy Theater in Pawtucket, RI (with Tony no less!) and is a cast member of The Empire Revue, Providence's long-running monthly variety show. The discussion covers Archie's origins and DeCarlo's deceptively simple style, growing up on Archie, Ayla's bias against the CW's modern reimagining of the characters, how Matt and Tony know as little as they do about the characters without ever having read any of the comics before now, and how easily the simple formula of Archie stories allow the gang to crossover with zombies...

73 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Archie Comics with Ayla Ahlquist

Veronica Mars

EBiker gangs, dead tech heiresses, and world-weary young gumshoes: Welcome to Veronica Mars. Veronica Mars has long held a reputation as a cult classic: Matt's long been a fan, but Tony missed it entirely during its initial run. Now, thanks to the recent Hulu revival, star Kristen Bell's higher profile, and an admiration for Raymond Chandler, Tony's got it on his radar and is ready to dive into the seedy underbelly of Neptune High. After discussing a few different TV shows at WDWM, the guys decide to limit their scope and focus on the show's pilot episode. They go beat by beat on the episode's stand-alone mystery, the characters, and the table setting for the world being set up. They also talk big picture about noir, and how the high school experience makes a great template for a lot of the tropes common to hard-boiled detective stories.

71 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Veronica Mars

The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari

E100 years makes a world of difference, especially when it comes to film. But the more things change, the more they stay the same, and even in the century since its release you can still see and feel the macabre influence of Robert Wiene's 1920 classic of the silent era, The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari. When people talk about German Expressionism in film, this is the movie they're talking about. Its DNA appears in everything - from Citizen Kane to Edward Scissorhands, from Dr. Seuss to Rob Zombie - and after years of hearing and reading about its impact on so many artists, Matt and Tony are happy to finally cross this one off their lists.

59 MINOCT 30
Comments
The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari

We Have Always Lived in the Castle

EFor part three of our run of horror episodes, we take their first steps into the New England Gothic world of Shirley Jackson. Jackson, whose The Haunting of Hill House was adapted by Netflix last year, has had a lasting influence on horror. For this episode, we're beginning at the end, with a deep dive into Jackson's final novel, the chilling, 1962 tale of two sisters and a house: We Have Always Lived in the Castle. Joining us this week is Emma Sarconi, Reference Professional for Special Collections at Princeton University's Firestone Library. Emma offers some insight into the world of special collections, including the sorts of artifacts and stories that personally make her work so special, as well as a background of Jackson's life and family to provide some additional context to this eerie tale of otherness and mystery set in small-town Vermont.

94 MINOCT 23
Comments
We Have Always Lived in the Castle

Tales From the Crypt

EWe're in week two of Horror Month, and our guest Jarret Blinkhorn is here to talks us through the HBO horror/comedy anthology, Tales From the Crypt. Based of the EC Comics that scandalized parents and senators in the mid-twentieth century, TFTC ran for seven seasons from 1989-1996 and translated comics into a super stylish, morally-depraved Twilight Zone, swapping out suave and detatched host Rod Serling for a rotting corpse of a Crypt Keeper who seems more interested in his characters getting mangled than learning a lesson. We focus on four episodes - Television Terror, Cutting Cards, And All Through the House, and The Ventriloquist's Dummy - to get a sense of what made the show a wicked delight: great guest directors and stars, a short-and-sweet run time, and a willingness to make big choices to capture the pulpy sleaze and atmosphere that made the comics such a scandal. And puns. Lots and lots of puns.

80 MINOCT 16
Comments
Tales From the Crypt

Texas Chain Saw Massacre

EThis week's episode kicks off Horror Month at What Did We Miss? with four straight weeks of creepy, crawly episodes. Kicking things off is the 1974 slasher classic, Texas Chain Saw Massacre, which introduced to world to director Tobe Hooper and one of cinema's most enduring horror icons, Leatherface. For Matt, this is easily an all-time favorite. For Tony, well, he saw the remake if that counts (it doesn't). In this episode they discuss the origins of the film and Matt's relation to it, the surprising amount of humor, how the remake's excessive grime oversold the idea of the movie's murder house, how a lack of gore does not a PG-rated movie make, and the some of the stunning imagery that - much to Tony's surprise - made this a gorgeous grindhouse slasher flick.

83 MINOCT 9
Comments
Texas Chain Saw Massacre

Barney Miller with Ken Reid, Host of TV Guidance Counselor

EKen Reid is a standup comic from Boston, MA and the host of the podcast TV Guidance Counselor, where he welcomes a guest to flip through an old issue of TV Guide and talk about what would have been watching that week. Ken is a well of TV and pop culture knowledge, making him the perfect guide through the '70s workplace-cop-sitcom, Barney Miller. We discuss, among other things: how Ken collected such a massive collection of TV Guide issues, the grit and grime of '70s TV, Barney Miller and its ability to tackle big, progressive issues head on, Night Court as Barney Miller Jr., and lastly, as we head into October, Ken talks about a few of his favorite Halloween episodes of classic TV. Follow Ken on Twitter and Instagram: @TVGuidance Subscribe to TV Guidance Counselor on Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/ie/podcast/tv-guidance-counselor-podcast/id821665905

81 MINOCT 2
Comments
Barney Miller with Ken Reid, Host of TV Guidance Counselor

Purple Rain with Jodie Vinson, Program Manager of What Cheer Writers Club

EJodie Vinson is a writer and editor, and is the Program Manager of What Cheer Writers Club in Providence, RI, which happens to be where we have the privilege of recording WDWM. When given the open invite to come on, Jodie gave us a list of her pop culture blind spots, but without thinking twice we settled on Purple Rain. Matt knew the album, Tony knew the movie, but Jodie was coming in blind for both. In this week's episode, the three of us gush over the album, the movie, and Prince's singular legacy as a pop star.

112 MINSEP 25
Comments
Purple Rain with Jodie Vinson, Program Manager of What Cheer Writers Club

The X-Files with Brian Raftery, author of Best. Movie. Year. Ever.

EThis week we're joined by Brian Raftery, film writer and author of the book Best. Movie. Year. Ever., which examines the films of 1999. At the time, Brian was just getting started as a writer for Entertainment Weekly, so he was on the front lines of a seminal year for film in a year where everything felt a little apocalyptic (ah, the quaintness of Y2K). What he wasn't doing was watching a lot of TV, so for this week's blind spot we'll be Brian's guides as he sits down with the The X-Files for the first time. In this episode we discuss Brian's book and how we're still having the same conversations they were 20 years later, then we dive into four of our favorite "Monster of the Week" episodes of The X-Files: Clyde Bruckman's Final Repose, Home, Bad Blood, and Drive.

98 MINSEP 11
Comments
The X-Files with Brian Raftery, author of Best. Movie. Year. Ever.

Fun Home

EThis week Matt and Tony discuss Alison Bechdel's 2006 award-winning graphic memoir Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic. For Matt, who discovered the book at a pivotal time in his life, this is a chance to revisit an old favorite with fresh eyes while Tony is going in blind, only knowing Bechdel as the source of The Bechdel Test. They discuss the mainstream praise Fun Home earned upon its release and the universal draw of coming of age stories. They also get into some personal territory as they use Alison's experiences with her parents to examine some of their own life experiences.

59 MINAUG 28
Comments
Fun Home

Latest Episodes

Archie Comics with Ayla Ahlquist

EDespite recognizing the characters, Matt and Tony have never read a single Archie comic book. This week they fix that by sitting down with classic tales of teenage antics as drawn by Dan DeCarlo, the Archie artist who established the house style and solidified the characters' iconic looks. Joining them is Ayla Ahlquist, a Providence-based comedy writer and performer who was raised on the adventures of the Archie gang. Ayla regularly performs improv comedy at Wage House Comedy Theater in Pawtucket, RI (with Tony no less!) and is a cast member of The Empire Revue, Providence's long-running monthly variety show. The discussion covers Archie's origins and DeCarlo's deceptively simple style, growing up on Archie, Ayla's bias against the CW's modern reimagining of the characters, how Matt and Tony know as little as they do about the characters without ever having read any of the comics before now, and how easily the simple formula of Archie stories allow the gang to crossover with zombies...

73 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Archie Comics with Ayla Ahlquist

Veronica Mars

EBiker gangs, dead tech heiresses, and world-weary young gumshoes: Welcome to Veronica Mars. Veronica Mars has long held a reputation as a cult classic: Matt's long been a fan, but Tony missed it entirely during its initial run. Now, thanks to the recent Hulu revival, star Kristen Bell's higher profile, and an admiration for Raymond Chandler, Tony's got it on his radar and is ready to dive into the seedy underbelly of Neptune High. After discussing a few different TV shows at WDWM, the guys decide to limit their scope and focus on the show's pilot episode. They go beat by beat on the episode's stand-alone mystery, the characters, and the table setting for the world being set up. They also talk big picture about noir, and how the high school experience makes a great template for a lot of the tropes common to hard-boiled detective stories.

71 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Veronica Mars

The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari

E100 years makes a world of difference, especially when it comes to film. But the more things change, the more they stay the same, and even in the century since its release you can still see and feel the macabre influence of Robert Wiene's 1920 classic of the silent era, The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari. When people talk about German Expressionism in film, this is the movie they're talking about. Its DNA appears in everything - from Citizen Kane to Edward Scissorhands, from Dr. Seuss to Rob Zombie - and after years of hearing and reading about its impact on so many artists, Matt and Tony are happy to finally cross this one off their lists.

59 MINOCT 30
Comments
The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari

We Have Always Lived in the Castle

EFor part three of our run of horror episodes, we take their first steps into the New England Gothic world of Shirley Jackson. Jackson, whose The Haunting of Hill House was adapted by Netflix last year, has had a lasting influence on horror. For this episode, we're beginning at the end, with a deep dive into Jackson's final novel, the chilling, 1962 tale of two sisters and a house: We Have Always Lived in the Castle. Joining us this week is Emma Sarconi, Reference Professional for Special Collections at Princeton University's Firestone Library. Emma offers some insight into the world of special collections, including the sorts of artifacts and stories that personally make her work so special, as well as a background of Jackson's life and family to provide some additional context to this eerie tale of otherness and mystery set in small-town Vermont.

94 MINOCT 23
Comments
We Have Always Lived in the Castle

Tales From the Crypt

EWe're in week two of Horror Month, and our guest Jarret Blinkhorn is here to talks us through the HBO horror/comedy anthology, Tales From the Crypt. Based of the EC Comics that scandalized parents and senators in the mid-twentieth century, TFTC ran for seven seasons from 1989-1996 and translated comics into a super stylish, morally-depraved Twilight Zone, swapping out suave and detatched host Rod Serling for a rotting corpse of a Crypt Keeper who seems more interested in his characters getting mangled than learning a lesson. We focus on four episodes - Television Terror, Cutting Cards, And All Through the House, and The Ventriloquist's Dummy - to get a sense of what made the show a wicked delight: great guest directors and stars, a short-and-sweet run time, and a willingness to make big choices to capture the pulpy sleaze and atmosphere that made the comics such a scandal. And puns. Lots and lots of puns.

80 MINOCT 16
Comments
Tales From the Crypt

Texas Chain Saw Massacre

EThis week's episode kicks off Horror Month at What Did We Miss? with four straight weeks of creepy, crawly episodes. Kicking things off is the 1974 slasher classic, Texas Chain Saw Massacre, which introduced to world to director Tobe Hooper and one of cinema's most enduring horror icons, Leatherface. For Matt, this is easily an all-time favorite. For Tony, well, he saw the remake if that counts (it doesn't). In this episode they discuss the origins of the film and Matt's relation to it, the surprising amount of humor, how the remake's excessive grime oversold the idea of the movie's murder house, how a lack of gore does not a PG-rated movie make, and the some of the stunning imagery that - much to Tony's surprise - made this a gorgeous grindhouse slasher flick.

83 MINOCT 9
Comments
Texas Chain Saw Massacre

Barney Miller with Ken Reid, Host of TV Guidance Counselor

EKen Reid is a standup comic from Boston, MA and the host of the podcast TV Guidance Counselor, where he welcomes a guest to flip through an old issue of TV Guide and talk about what would have been watching that week. Ken is a well of TV and pop culture knowledge, making him the perfect guide through the '70s workplace-cop-sitcom, Barney Miller. We discuss, among other things: how Ken collected such a massive collection of TV Guide issues, the grit and grime of '70s TV, Barney Miller and its ability to tackle big, progressive issues head on, Night Court as Barney Miller Jr., and lastly, as we head into October, Ken talks about a few of his favorite Halloween episodes of classic TV. Follow Ken on Twitter and Instagram: @TVGuidance Subscribe to TV Guidance Counselor on Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/ie/podcast/tv-guidance-counselor-podcast/id821665905

81 MINOCT 2
Comments
Barney Miller with Ken Reid, Host of TV Guidance Counselor

Purple Rain with Jodie Vinson, Program Manager of What Cheer Writers Club

EJodie Vinson is a writer and editor, and is the Program Manager of What Cheer Writers Club in Providence, RI, which happens to be where we have the privilege of recording WDWM. When given the open invite to come on, Jodie gave us a list of her pop culture blind spots, but without thinking twice we settled on Purple Rain. Matt knew the album, Tony knew the movie, but Jodie was coming in blind for both. In this week's episode, the three of us gush over the album, the movie, and Prince's singular legacy as a pop star.

112 MINSEP 25
Comments
Purple Rain with Jodie Vinson, Program Manager of What Cheer Writers Club

The X-Files with Brian Raftery, author of Best. Movie. Year. Ever.

EThis week we're joined by Brian Raftery, film writer and author of the book Best. Movie. Year. Ever., which examines the films of 1999. At the time, Brian was just getting started as a writer for Entertainment Weekly, so he was on the front lines of a seminal year for film in a year where everything felt a little apocalyptic (ah, the quaintness of Y2K). What he wasn't doing was watching a lot of TV, so for this week's blind spot we'll be Brian's guides as he sits down with the The X-Files for the first time. In this episode we discuss Brian's book and how we're still having the same conversations they were 20 years later, then we dive into four of our favorite "Monster of the Week" episodes of The X-Files: Clyde Bruckman's Final Repose, Home, Bad Blood, and Drive.

98 MINSEP 11
Comments
The X-Files with Brian Raftery, author of Best. Movie. Year. Ever.

Fun Home

EThis week Matt and Tony discuss Alison Bechdel's 2006 award-winning graphic memoir Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic. For Matt, who discovered the book at a pivotal time in his life, this is a chance to revisit an old favorite with fresh eyes while Tony is going in blind, only knowing Bechdel as the source of The Bechdel Test. They discuss the mainstream praise Fun Home earned upon its release and the universal draw of coming of age stories. They also get into some personal territory as they use Alison's experiences with her parents to examine some of their own life experiences.

59 MINAUG 28
Comments
Fun Home
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