title

Breaking Walls

James Scully

9
Followers
19
Plays
Breaking Walls
Breaking Walls

Breaking Walls

James Scully

9
Followers
19
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Details

About Us

Breaking Walls: The Podcast on the History of American Network Radio.

Latest Episodes

Have You Been Enjoying Breaking Walls?

Have you been enjoying Breaking Walls? If so, give us a quick iTunes rating. The more people who do, the more people who will be able to discover Breaking Walls through the iTunes show algorithms.

13 s23 h ago
Comments
Have You Been Enjoying Breaking Walls?

Vincent Price On How He Got His Radio Start

In late 1972, Vincent Price sat down with Dick Bertel and Ed Corcoran for WTIC's The Golden Age of Radio (full interview here - https://www.goldenage-wtic.org/gaor-32.html). During the course of their conversation, Price spoke about how he became a radio actor even though he wasn't part of any radio stock company. Price acted in numerous dramatic radio productions in both in the United States and Europe.

1 MIN1 d ago
Comments
Vincent Price On How He Got His Radio Start

The Six Shooter: Britt Poncett's Christmas Carol—12/20/1953

The Six Shooter was a weekly old-time radio program in the United States. It was created by Frank Burt, who also wrote many of the episodes, and directed by Jack Johnstone. It starred James Stewart in his only regular radio series. The series lasted only one season of 39 episodes on NBC (Sept. 20, 1953-June 24, 1954). Initially, it was broadcast on Sundays at 9:30 p.m. Eastern Time, through October 11th. Then it was heard at 8:30 p.m. for three weeks. Finally, on November 8, 1953 through March 21, 1954, it was broadcast Sundays at 8 p.m. On December 20th, 1953 they presented a western adaptation of Charles Dickens; "A Christmas Carol."

28 MIN2 d ago
Comments
The Six Shooter: Britt Poncett's Christmas Carol—12/20/1953

Stories From Radio's Christmas Day 1947 Programming

This is a snippet from Breaking Walls Episode 98: Christmas Week 1947 with Radio's Biggest Stars ———————————— At 11:30AM Pacific Time on Christmas Morning in 1947, as families were opening their homes to loved ones, King George VI’s Royal Christmas Message was delivered from England, and broadcast over all CBS stations. King George said "the unity and steadfastness of the British Commonwealth and Empire, saved the liberties of the world." He called on listeners not to doubt their will to win in the face of post-war challenges. In Los Angeles, opposite on Mutual’s affiliate, KHJ in its regular time slot was Queen For a Day. At 1PM Pacific Time over all CBS stations, The Elgin Watch Company broadcast their sixth annual Christmas Special. Like their Thanksgiving special the previous month, it featured a numerous entertainment celebs offering seasons greetings. Opposite NBC broadcast an orchestral Christmas concert featuring Thomas L. Thomas.

36 MIN2 d ago
Comments
Stories From Radio's Christmas Day 1947 Programming

Harry Von Zell On Teaming With Eddie Cantor

On February 19th, 1975 legendary radio announcer Harry Von Zell sat down with Chuck Schaden for a conversation about his life and career (full chat available here -http://www.speakingofradio.com/interviews/von-zell-harry-2/). During the course of the interview, Harry spoke about his long-time partnership with comedian Eddie Cantor.

1 MIN4 d ago
Comments
Harry Von Zell On Teaming With Eddie Cantor

Fibber McGee Loses His Keys and Struggles With Christmas 1947

This is a snippet from Breaking Walls Episode 98: Christmas Week 1947 with Radio's Biggest Stars ———————————— On Tuesday nights in December of 1947, NBC ran four of the top thirteen shows on the air with Amos n’ Andy, Fibber McGee & Molly, The Bob Hope Show, and The Red Skelton Show. Jim and Marion Jordan were in the midst of their ninth consecutive season with a top-three rated show. In December, their show rating was 29.9. Unfortunately for Fibber, he's lost his keys right in the middle of a snowstorm. His key ring contains the key to his hall closet where all the Christmas presents are stored.

6 MIN5 d ago
Comments
Fibber McGee Loses His Keys and Struggles With Christmas 1947

Jackson Beck On His Radio Roles and a Funny Louis Armstrong Story

In March of 1973, Jackson Beck was a guest of Dick Bertel and Ed Corcoran on WTIC's The Golden Age of Radio (full interview here - https://www.goldenage-wtic.org/gaor-36.html). Beck was a New York city native that had, to that point, had a forty year career as a voice actor and announcer in every format from radio (The Adventures of Superman, Philo Vance), commercials, and cartoons (Bluto in Popeye). In this clip, Mr. Beck talks about some of those roles and tells a funny Louis Armstrong story.

1 MIN5 d ago
Comments
Jackson Beck On His Radio Roles and a Funny Louis Armstrong Story

Mel Allen On The Radio Sports Coverage Wars Between CBS and NBC

In July of 1975 legendary sportscaster Mel Allen sat down with WTIC's Dick Bertel and Ed Corcoran for a conversation about his life and career (full interview here - https://goldenage-wtic.org/gaor-64.html). Before Allen became famous for calling baseball he was working as a staff announcer at CBS. In the late 1930s and early 1940s as CBS and NBC were jockeying for position as the nation's number one network, the competitors tried various underhanded tactics to get a leg up in the sportscasting world. Allen shared some of those memories.

3 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Mel Allen On The Radio Sports Coverage Wars Between CBS and NBC

When Milton Berle Finally Established Himself on Radio In December Of 1947

This is a snippet from Breaking Walls Episode 98: Christmas Week 1947 with Radio's Biggest Stars ———————————— For the four major radio networks, 1947 was a year or record business: ABC saw a 7.25% gross billings increase. NBC sold out its entire primetime programming block. CBS had seventeen shows with ratings higher than fifteen. And Mutual Broadcasting had the most affiliates in the country. Total radio revenue was over five-hundred million dollars. There were now more than thirty-six million radio homes, and urban centers accounted for 60% of the US population. It was in this season that Milton Berle finally established himself on radio. The Milton Berle Show was one of a half-dozen titles showcasing Berle in his star-crossed radio career. Until 1946 he was considered radio’s best-known ratings failure. But NBC saw potential in Berle where CBS had failed. In March of 1947 they gave him his own variety show, sponsored by Philip Morris. It featured some of radio’s top...

10 MIN1 w ago
Comments
When Milton Berle Finally Established Himself on Radio In December Of 1947

Jack Benny And Fred Allen Count Down To Christmas 1947

This is a snippet from Breaking Walls Episode 98: Christmas Week 1947 with Radio's Biggest Stars ———————————— Sunday nights at 7PM was appointment radio from the mid 1930s through the end of the 1940s. Why? Because of one man: Jack Benny. It was the monumental success of Jack Benny’s 1945-46 season which led to solo shows for Phil Harris, Mel Blanc, and Dennis Day. In the fall of 1947, Sunday night ratings were dominated by NBC. Their seven to nine PM programming block of Jack Benny, Harris & Faye, Fred Allen, and Bergen & McCarthy all had ratings over 20 points. Jack Benny, and his program, was the network’s linchpin. Meanwhile, at 8:30PM from New York, Fred Allen signed on NBC. The comedian was enjoying the best season of his career. His Sunday night rating was 27.4, third-highest on the air.

26 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Jack Benny And Fred Allen Count Down To Christmas 1947

Latest Episodes

Have You Been Enjoying Breaking Walls?

Have you been enjoying Breaking Walls? If so, give us a quick iTunes rating. The more people who do, the more people who will be able to discover Breaking Walls through the iTunes show algorithms.

13 s23 h ago
Comments
Have You Been Enjoying Breaking Walls?

Vincent Price On How He Got His Radio Start

In late 1972, Vincent Price sat down with Dick Bertel and Ed Corcoran for WTIC's The Golden Age of Radio (full interview here - https://www.goldenage-wtic.org/gaor-32.html). During the course of their conversation, Price spoke about how he became a radio actor even though he wasn't part of any radio stock company. Price acted in numerous dramatic radio productions in both in the United States and Europe.

1 MIN1 d ago
Comments
Vincent Price On How He Got His Radio Start

The Six Shooter: Britt Poncett's Christmas Carol—12/20/1953

The Six Shooter was a weekly old-time radio program in the United States. It was created by Frank Burt, who also wrote many of the episodes, and directed by Jack Johnstone. It starred James Stewart in his only regular radio series. The series lasted only one season of 39 episodes on NBC (Sept. 20, 1953-June 24, 1954). Initially, it was broadcast on Sundays at 9:30 p.m. Eastern Time, through October 11th. Then it was heard at 8:30 p.m. for three weeks. Finally, on November 8, 1953 through March 21, 1954, it was broadcast Sundays at 8 p.m. On December 20th, 1953 they presented a western adaptation of Charles Dickens; "A Christmas Carol."

28 MIN2 d ago
Comments
The Six Shooter: Britt Poncett's Christmas Carol—12/20/1953

Stories From Radio's Christmas Day 1947 Programming

This is a snippet from Breaking Walls Episode 98: Christmas Week 1947 with Radio's Biggest Stars ———————————— At 11:30AM Pacific Time on Christmas Morning in 1947, as families were opening their homes to loved ones, King George VI’s Royal Christmas Message was delivered from England, and broadcast over all CBS stations. King George said "the unity and steadfastness of the British Commonwealth and Empire, saved the liberties of the world." He called on listeners not to doubt their will to win in the face of post-war challenges. In Los Angeles, opposite on Mutual’s affiliate, KHJ in its regular time slot was Queen For a Day. At 1PM Pacific Time over all CBS stations, The Elgin Watch Company broadcast their sixth annual Christmas Special. Like their Thanksgiving special the previous month, it featured a numerous entertainment celebs offering seasons greetings. Opposite NBC broadcast an orchestral Christmas concert featuring Thomas L. Thomas.

36 MIN2 d ago
Comments
Stories From Radio's Christmas Day 1947 Programming

Harry Von Zell On Teaming With Eddie Cantor

On February 19th, 1975 legendary radio announcer Harry Von Zell sat down with Chuck Schaden for a conversation about his life and career (full chat available here -http://www.speakingofradio.com/interviews/von-zell-harry-2/). During the course of the interview, Harry spoke about his long-time partnership with comedian Eddie Cantor.

1 MIN4 d ago
Comments
Harry Von Zell On Teaming With Eddie Cantor

Fibber McGee Loses His Keys and Struggles With Christmas 1947

This is a snippet from Breaking Walls Episode 98: Christmas Week 1947 with Radio's Biggest Stars ———————————— On Tuesday nights in December of 1947, NBC ran four of the top thirteen shows on the air with Amos n’ Andy, Fibber McGee & Molly, The Bob Hope Show, and The Red Skelton Show. Jim and Marion Jordan were in the midst of their ninth consecutive season with a top-three rated show. In December, their show rating was 29.9. Unfortunately for Fibber, he's lost his keys right in the middle of a snowstorm. His key ring contains the key to his hall closet where all the Christmas presents are stored.

6 MIN5 d ago
Comments
Fibber McGee Loses His Keys and Struggles With Christmas 1947

Jackson Beck On His Radio Roles and a Funny Louis Armstrong Story

In March of 1973, Jackson Beck was a guest of Dick Bertel and Ed Corcoran on WTIC's The Golden Age of Radio (full interview here - https://www.goldenage-wtic.org/gaor-36.html). Beck was a New York city native that had, to that point, had a forty year career as a voice actor and announcer in every format from radio (The Adventures of Superman, Philo Vance), commercials, and cartoons (Bluto in Popeye). In this clip, Mr. Beck talks about some of those roles and tells a funny Louis Armstrong story.

1 MIN5 d ago
Comments
Jackson Beck On His Radio Roles and a Funny Louis Armstrong Story

Mel Allen On The Radio Sports Coverage Wars Between CBS and NBC

In July of 1975 legendary sportscaster Mel Allen sat down with WTIC's Dick Bertel and Ed Corcoran for a conversation about his life and career (full interview here - https://goldenage-wtic.org/gaor-64.html). Before Allen became famous for calling baseball he was working as a staff announcer at CBS. In the late 1930s and early 1940s as CBS and NBC were jockeying for position as the nation's number one network, the competitors tried various underhanded tactics to get a leg up in the sportscasting world. Allen shared some of those memories.

3 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Mel Allen On The Radio Sports Coverage Wars Between CBS and NBC

When Milton Berle Finally Established Himself on Radio In December Of 1947

This is a snippet from Breaking Walls Episode 98: Christmas Week 1947 with Radio's Biggest Stars ———————————— For the four major radio networks, 1947 was a year or record business: ABC saw a 7.25% gross billings increase. NBC sold out its entire primetime programming block. CBS had seventeen shows with ratings higher than fifteen. And Mutual Broadcasting had the most affiliates in the country. Total radio revenue was over five-hundred million dollars. There were now more than thirty-six million radio homes, and urban centers accounted for 60% of the US population. It was in this season that Milton Berle finally established himself on radio. The Milton Berle Show was one of a half-dozen titles showcasing Berle in his star-crossed radio career. Until 1946 he was considered radio’s best-known ratings failure. But NBC saw potential in Berle where CBS had failed. In March of 1947 they gave him his own variety show, sponsored by Philip Morris. It featured some of radio’s top...

10 MIN1 w ago
Comments
When Milton Berle Finally Established Himself on Radio In December Of 1947

Jack Benny And Fred Allen Count Down To Christmas 1947

This is a snippet from Breaking Walls Episode 98: Christmas Week 1947 with Radio's Biggest Stars ———————————— Sunday nights at 7PM was appointment radio from the mid 1930s through the end of the 1940s. Why? Because of one man: Jack Benny. It was the monumental success of Jack Benny’s 1945-46 season which led to solo shows for Phil Harris, Mel Blanc, and Dennis Day. In the fall of 1947, Sunday night ratings were dominated by NBC. Their seven to nine PM programming block of Jack Benny, Harris & Faye, Fred Allen, and Bergen & McCarthy all had ratings over 20 points. Jack Benny, and his program, was the network’s linchpin. Meanwhile, at 8:30PM from New York, Fred Allen signed on NBC. The comedian was enjoying the best season of his career. His Sunday night rating was 27.4, third-highest on the air.

26 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Jack Benny And Fred Allen Count Down To Christmas 1947
hmly
himalayaプレミアムへようこそ聴き放題のオーディオブックをお楽しみください。