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National Gallery of Art | Audio

National Gallery of Art, Washington

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Followers
49
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National Gallery of Art | Audio
National Gallery of Art | Audio

National Gallery of Art | Audio

National Gallery of Art, Washington

35
Followers
49
Plays
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About Us

This audio series offers entertaining, informative discussions about the arts and events at the National Gallery of Art. These podcasts give access to special Gallery talks by well-known artists, authors, curators, and historians. Included in this podcast listing are established series: The Diamonstein-Spielvogel Lecture Series, The Sydney J. Freedberg Lecture in Italian Art, Elson Lecture Series, A. W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts, Conversationricans with Artists Series, Conversations with Collectors Series, and Wyeth Lectures in Ame Art Series. Download the programs, then visit us on the National Mall or at www.nga.gov, where you can explore many of the works of art mentioned. New podcasts are released every Tuesday.

Latest Episodes

Celebrating the Old Master Collections of the National Gallery of Art: American Painting, 1700–1900

Heidi Applegate, guest lecturer The 2019 Summer Sunday Lecture Series takes a closer look at the many treasures housed in the Gallery’s permanent collection. Works by Italian, French, Dutch, and American artists are featured in this visual tour. New insights and surprising discoveries await, featuring Gallery favorites and recently acquired works. In this fourth lecture in the series, presented on August 4, 2019 guest lecturer Heidi Applegate discusses the Gallery’s collection of American paintings. The American collection has grown from 10 paintings when the West Building opened in 1941 to become the largest of the paintings departments in the museum. Dr. Heidi Applegate gives an overview of how the collection has been assembled over the past seven decades, underscoring the transformative addition in 2014 of paintings from the Corcoran Gallery of Art.

51 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Celebrating the Old Master Collections of the National Gallery of Art: American Painting, 1700–1900

2019 Summer Sunday Lecture Series: Celebrating the Old Masters of the NGA: British Painting

Heidi Applegate, guest lecturer The 2019 Summer Sunday Lecture Series takes a closer look at the many treasures housed in the Gallery’s permanent collection. Works by Italian, French, Dutch, and American artists are featured in this visual tour. New insights and surprising discoveries await, featuring Gallery favorites and recently acquired works. In this third lecture in the series, presented on July 28, guest lecturer Heidi Applegate discusses the Gallery’s collection of British paintings, known for its “Grand Manner” portraits by Sir Joshua Reynolds and Thomas Gainsborough, landscapes by John Constable, and seascapes by J. M. W. Turner. Applegate discusses the history of the collection, paintings that have changed over time, and recent acquisitions by John Martin, Richard Parkes Bonington, and John Ward of Hull.

51 MIN2 w ago
Comments
2019 Summer Sunday Lecture Series: Celebrating the Old Masters of the NGA: British Painting

The End of the Sixties: Kerry James Marshall’s “Mementos”

James Meyer, curator of modern art, National Gallery of Art In his book The Art of Return: The Sixties and Contemporary Culture, introduced at the National Gallery of Art on September 8, 2019, James Meyer turns to art criticism, theory, memoir, and fiction to examine the fascination with this period and expressions of cultural memories across the globe. He draws on a diverse range of cultural objects that reimagine the “long” 1960s―a revolutionary era stretching from the mid-1950s to the mid-1970s―including reenactments of civil rights, antiwar, and feminist marches; paintings; sculptures; photographs; novels; and films. Many of these works are by artists and writers born during this period who are driven to understand a monumental era that they missed. These cases show us that the past becomes significant only in relation to our present, and our remembered history never perfectly replicates time past. This, Meyer argues, is precisely what makes our contemporary attachment to th...

51 MIN2 w ago
Comments
The End of the Sixties: Kerry James Marshall’s “Mementos”

Conversations with Artists: Oliver Lee Jackson

Oliver Lee Jackson, artist, in conversation with Harry Cooper, senior curator and head of modern art, National Gallery of Art American painter, printmaker, and sculptor Oliver Lee Jackson (b. 1935) has created a complex body of work which masterfully weaves together visual influences ranging from the Renaissance to modernism with principles of rhythm and improvisation drawn from his study of African cultures and American jazz. Held on September 15, 2019, this conversation between the artist and Harry Cooper, senior curator and head of modern art, marked the last day of the exhibition Oliver Lee Jackson: Recent Paintings. The exhibition presented some 25 paintings created over the past 15 years, many of which were seen publicly for the first time. Jackson’s often large-scale paintings blend figural elements of bodies pointing, kneeling, drawing, and playing instruments with colorful abstract compositions and vigorously worked surfaces. Each painting creates a space and world of its ...

51 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Conversations with Artists: Oliver Lee Jackson

Celebrating the Old Master Collections of the National Gallery of Art: British Painting, 1700–1850

Heidi Applegate, guest lecturer The 2019 Summer Sunday Lecture Series takes a closer look at the many treasures housed in the Gallery’s permanent collection. Works by Italian, French, Dutch, and American artists are featured in this visual tour. New insights and surprising discoveries await, featuring Gallery favorites and recently acquired works. In this third lecture in the series, presented on July 28, guest lecturer Heidi Applegate discusses the Gallery’s collection of British paintings, known for its “Grand Manner” portraits by Sir Joshua Reynolds and Thomas Gainsborough, landscapes by John Constable, and seascapes by J. M. W. Turner. Applegate discusses the history of the collection, paintings that have changed over time, and recent acquisitions by John Martin, Richard Parkes Bonington, and John Ward of Hull.

51 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Celebrating the Old Master Collections of the National Gallery of Art: British Painting, 1700–1850

Celebrating the Old Master Collections of the National Gallery of Art: French Art of the 18th Century

David Gariff, senior lecturer, National Gallery of Art The 2019 Summer Sunday Lecture Series focuses on the outstanding collections of old master paintings in the National Gallery of Art, and also includes a discussion of the extraordinary American furniture from the Kaufman Collection, currently on view on the ground floor of the West Building. Over the decades, appreciation of French eighteenth-century art has fluctuated between preference for the alluring decorative canvases of rococo artists such as François Boucher and Jean-Honoré Fragonard to admiration for the sober neoclassicism championed by Jacques-Louis David and his pupils. In this final lecture in the series, presented on August 25, David Gariff, senior lecturer, surveys the history of French art in the eighteenth century from the time of Louis XIV to the French Revolution. In addition to works by Boucher, Fragonard, and David, scenes of daily life by Antoine Watteau, Jean-Siméon Chardin, and Jean-Baptiste Greuze are...

51 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Celebrating the Old Master Collections of the National Gallery of Art: French Art of the 18th Century

American Pre-Raphaelitism through the Lens and on the Canvas

Sophie Lynford, doctoral candidate in the history of art, Yale University; Diane Waggoner, curator of 19th-century photographs, National Gallery of Art In celebration of the 200th anniversary of the birth of John Ruskin (1819–1900), the most influential art critic of the Victorian era, the Gallery presents The American Pre-Raphaelites: Radical Realists, an exhibition of some 90 artworks created by American artists who were profoundly influenced by Ruskin’s call for a revolutionary change in the practice of art. A group of artists, architects, scientists, critics, and collectors sympathetic to Ruskin’s ideas formed the Association for the Advancement of Truth in Art, which sought reform not only in artistic practices, but also in the broader political arena. In a paired lecture delivered at the National Gallery of Art on June 16, 2019, Sophie Lynford and Diane Waggoner described further what Lynford has called the American Pre-Raphaelites’ “comprehensive, multipronged agenda.” ...

51 MINSEP 24
Comments
American Pre-Raphaelitism through the Lens and on the Canvas

FAPE 2019: Ken Burns and the American Story

Ken Burns, filmmaker, in conversation with David M. Rubenstein, co-founder and co-CEO of The Carlyle Group, chairman of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, trustee of the National Gallery of Art, and chairman of the Smithsonian Institution In documentaries such as The Civil War, Baseball, Jazz, and The West, filmmaker Ken Burns has spent 40 years investigating American history and culture. His films tell the American story not only in terms of victories and major historical flashpoints, but also through the lives of individuals and relationships. Burns’s films have been honored with dozens of major awards, including 16 Emmy Awards, 2 Grammy Awards, and 2 Oscar nominations; in September 2008, he was honored by the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences with a Lifetime Achievement Award. The National Gallery of Art, in collaboration with the Foundation for Art and Preservation in Embassies (FAPE), hosted Burns for a conversation with David Rubenstein on April 28, 2019.

51 MINSEP 10
Comments
FAPE 2019: Ken Burns and the American Story

The Art and Literature of the Great War

David Gariff, senior lecturer, National Gallery of Art. The First World War, known as the Great War, was also the first modern war, claiming millions of lives, in part, by newly invented weapons such as the machine gun, tank, aircraft, and poison gas. The arts of the period present a portrait of the terrible price paid by humanity—the carnage and suffering caused by the war were documented in paintings, sculptures, novels, memoirs, and poems produced both during, and immediately after, the struggle. In this presentation on March 27, 2019, senior lecturer David Gariff explores the responses of artists and writers to the trauma of the First World War, which transcended national boundaries. Paintings, sculptures, and prints by Otto Dix, Wilhelm Lehmbruck, Käthe Kollwitz, Fernand Léger, John Singer Sargent, and Natalija Goncharova; poems by Siegfried Sassoon, Wilfred Owen, and Anna Akhmatova; and memoirs and novels by Ernest Hemingway, Erich Maria Remarque, and Robert Graves are disc...

51 MINSEP 3
Comments
The Art and Literature of the Great War

Two Writers on Art, Music, and Modality

Paul Carter Harrison, playwright and expert in African American theatre, and Quincy Troupe, poet, in conversation with Harry Cooper, senior curator and head of modern art, National Gallery of Art American painter, printmaker, and sculptor Oliver Lee Jackson (b. 1935) has created a complex body of work which masterfully weaves together visual influences ranging from the Renaissance to modernism with principles of rhythm and improvisation drawn from his study of African cultures and American jazz. In a paired talk on May 19, 2019 at the National Gallery of Art, Paul Carter Harrison and Quincy Troupe, both writers and friends of Jackson, discussed their parallel pursuits of new avenues for creative thought and action. Harrison shared anecdotes from late-night studio discussions with Jackson, along with explanations of Jackson’s understanding of how his heritage factors into his work. Troupe read from his poetry and talked about the social and artistic environment in St. Louis, Missour...

51 MINSEP 3
Comments
Two Writers on Art, Music, and Modality

Latest Episodes

Celebrating the Old Master Collections of the National Gallery of Art: American Painting, 1700–1900

Heidi Applegate, guest lecturer The 2019 Summer Sunday Lecture Series takes a closer look at the many treasures housed in the Gallery’s permanent collection. Works by Italian, French, Dutch, and American artists are featured in this visual tour. New insights and surprising discoveries await, featuring Gallery favorites and recently acquired works. In this fourth lecture in the series, presented on August 4, 2019 guest lecturer Heidi Applegate discusses the Gallery’s collection of American paintings. The American collection has grown from 10 paintings when the West Building opened in 1941 to become the largest of the paintings departments in the museum. Dr. Heidi Applegate gives an overview of how the collection has been assembled over the past seven decades, underscoring the transformative addition in 2014 of paintings from the Corcoran Gallery of Art.

51 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Celebrating the Old Master Collections of the National Gallery of Art: American Painting, 1700–1900

2019 Summer Sunday Lecture Series: Celebrating the Old Masters of the NGA: British Painting

Heidi Applegate, guest lecturer The 2019 Summer Sunday Lecture Series takes a closer look at the many treasures housed in the Gallery’s permanent collection. Works by Italian, French, Dutch, and American artists are featured in this visual tour. New insights and surprising discoveries await, featuring Gallery favorites and recently acquired works. In this third lecture in the series, presented on July 28, guest lecturer Heidi Applegate discusses the Gallery’s collection of British paintings, known for its “Grand Manner” portraits by Sir Joshua Reynolds and Thomas Gainsborough, landscapes by John Constable, and seascapes by J. M. W. Turner. Applegate discusses the history of the collection, paintings that have changed over time, and recent acquisitions by John Martin, Richard Parkes Bonington, and John Ward of Hull.

51 MIN2 w ago
Comments
2019 Summer Sunday Lecture Series: Celebrating the Old Masters of the NGA: British Painting

The End of the Sixties: Kerry James Marshall’s “Mementos”

James Meyer, curator of modern art, National Gallery of Art In his book The Art of Return: The Sixties and Contemporary Culture, introduced at the National Gallery of Art on September 8, 2019, James Meyer turns to art criticism, theory, memoir, and fiction to examine the fascination with this period and expressions of cultural memories across the globe. He draws on a diverse range of cultural objects that reimagine the “long” 1960s―a revolutionary era stretching from the mid-1950s to the mid-1970s―including reenactments of civil rights, antiwar, and feminist marches; paintings; sculptures; photographs; novels; and films. Many of these works are by artists and writers born during this period who are driven to understand a monumental era that they missed. These cases show us that the past becomes significant only in relation to our present, and our remembered history never perfectly replicates time past. This, Meyer argues, is precisely what makes our contemporary attachment to th...

51 MIN2 w ago
Comments
The End of the Sixties: Kerry James Marshall’s “Mementos”

Conversations with Artists: Oliver Lee Jackson

Oliver Lee Jackson, artist, in conversation with Harry Cooper, senior curator and head of modern art, National Gallery of Art American painter, printmaker, and sculptor Oliver Lee Jackson (b. 1935) has created a complex body of work which masterfully weaves together visual influences ranging from the Renaissance to modernism with principles of rhythm and improvisation drawn from his study of African cultures and American jazz. Held on September 15, 2019, this conversation between the artist and Harry Cooper, senior curator and head of modern art, marked the last day of the exhibition Oliver Lee Jackson: Recent Paintings. The exhibition presented some 25 paintings created over the past 15 years, many of which were seen publicly for the first time. Jackson’s often large-scale paintings blend figural elements of bodies pointing, kneeling, drawing, and playing instruments with colorful abstract compositions and vigorously worked surfaces. Each painting creates a space and world of its ...

51 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Conversations with Artists: Oliver Lee Jackson

Celebrating the Old Master Collections of the National Gallery of Art: British Painting, 1700–1850

Heidi Applegate, guest lecturer The 2019 Summer Sunday Lecture Series takes a closer look at the many treasures housed in the Gallery’s permanent collection. Works by Italian, French, Dutch, and American artists are featured in this visual tour. New insights and surprising discoveries await, featuring Gallery favorites and recently acquired works. In this third lecture in the series, presented on July 28, guest lecturer Heidi Applegate discusses the Gallery’s collection of British paintings, known for its “Grand Manner” portraits by Sir Joshua Reynolds and Thomas Gainsborough, landscapes by John Constable, and seascapes by J. M. W. Turner. Applegate discusses the history of the collection, paintings that have changed over time, and recent acquisitions by John Martin, Richard Parkes Bonington, and John Ward of Hull.

51 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Celebrating the Old Master Collections of the National Gallery of Art: British Painting, 1700–1850

Celebrating the Old Master Collections of the National Gallery of Art: French Art of the 18th Century

David Gariff, senior lecturer, National Gallery of Art The 2019 Summer Sunday Lecture Series focuses on the outstanding collections of old master paintings in the National Gallery of Art, and also includes a discussion of the extraordinary American furniture from the Kaufman Collection, currently on view on the ground floor of the West Building. Over the decades, appreciation of French eighteenth-century art has fluctuated between preference for the alluring decorative canvases of rococo artists such as François Boucher and Jean-Honoré Fragonard to admiration for the sober neoclassicism championed by Jacques-Louis David and his pupils. In this final lecture in the series, presented on August 25, David Gariff, senior lecturer, surveys the history of French art in the eighteenth century from the time of Louis XIV to the French Revolution. In addition to works by Boucher, Fragonard, and David, scenes of daily life by Antoine Watteau, Jean-Siméon Chardin, and Jean-Baptiste Greuze are...

51 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Celebrating the Old Master Collections of the National Gallery of Art: French Art of the 18th Century

American Pre-Raphaelitism through the Lens and on the Canvas

Sophie Lynford, doctoral candidate in the history of art, Yale University; Diane Waggoner, curator of 19th-century photographs, National Gallery of Art In celebration of the 200th anniversary of the birth of John Ruskin (1819–1900), the most influential art critic of the Victorian era, the Gallery presents The American Pre-Raphaelites: Radical Realists, an exhibition of some 90 artworks created by American artists who were profoundly influenced by Ruskin’s call for a revolutionary change in the practice of art. A group of artists, architects, scientists, critics, and collectors sympathetic to Ruskin’s ideas formed the Association for the Advancement of Truth in Art, which sought reform not only in artistic practices, but also in the broader political arena. In a paired lecture delivered at the National Gallery of Art on June 16, 2019, Sophie Lynford and Diane Waggoner described further what Lynford has called the American Pre-Raphaelites’ “comprehensive, multipronged agenda.” ...

51 MINSEP 24
Comments
American Pre-Raphaelitism through the Lens and on the Canvas

FAPE 2019: Ken Burns and the American Story

Ken Burns, filmmaker, in conversation with David M. Rubenstein, co-founder and co-CEO of The Carlyle Group, chairman of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, trustee of the National Gallery of Art, and chairman of the Smithsonian Institution In documentaries such as The Civil War, Baseball, Jazz, and The West, filmmaker Ken Burns has spent 40 years investigating American history and culture. His films tell the American story not only in terms of victories and major historical flashpoints, but also through the lives of individuals and relationships. Burns’s films have been honored with dozens of major awards, including 16 Emmy Awards, 2 Grammy Awards, and 2 Oscar nominations; in September 2008, he was honored by the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences with a Lifetime Achievement Award. The National Gallery of Art, in collaboration with the Foundation for Art and Preservation in Embassies (FAPE), hosted Burns for a conversation with David Rubenstein on April 28, 2019.

51 MINSEP 10
Comments
FAPE 2019: Ken Burns and the American Story

The Art and Literature of the Great War

David Gariff, senior lecturer, National Gallery of Art. The First World War, known as the Great War, was also the first modern war, claiming millions of lives, in part, by newly invented weapons such as the machine gun, tank, aircraft, and poison gas. The arts of the period present a portrait of the terrible price paid by humanity—the carnage and suffering caused by the war were documented in paintings, sculptures, novels, memoirs, and poems produced both during, and immediately after, the struggle. In this presentation on March 27, 2019, senior lecturer David Gariff explores the responses of artists and writers to the trauma of the First World War, which transcended national boundaries. Paintings, sculptures, and prints by Otto Dix, Wilhelm Lehmbruck, Käthe Kollwitz, Fernand Léger, John Singer Sargent, and Natalija Goncharova; poems by Siegfried Sassoon, Wilfred Owen, and Anna Akhmatova; and memoirs and novels by Ernest Hemingway, Erich Maria Remarque, and Robert Graves are disc...

51 MINSEP 3
Comments
The Art and Literature of the Great War

Two Writers on Art, Music, and Modality

Paul Carter Harrison, playwright and expert in African American theatre, and Quincy Troupe, poet, in conversation with Harry Cooper, senior curator and head of modern art, National Gallery of Art American painter, printmaker, and sculptor Oliver Lee Jackson (b. 1935) has created a complex body of work which masterfully weaves together visual influences ranging from the Renaissance to modernism with principles of rhythm and improvisation drawn from his study of African cultures and American jazz. In a paired talk on May 19, 2019 at the National Gallery of Art, Paul Carter Harrison and Quincy Troupe, both writers and friends of Jackson, discussed their parallel pursuits of new avenues for creative thought and action. Harrison shared anecdotes from late-night studio discussions with Jackson, along with explanations of Jackson’s understanding of how his heritage factors into his work. Troupe read from his poetry and talked about the social and artistic environment in St. Louis, Missour...

51 MINSEP 3
Comments
Two Writers on Art, Music, and Modality
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