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Journey of an Aesthete Podcast

Mitch Hampton

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Journey of an Aesthete Podcast

Journey of an Aesthete Podcast

Mitch Hampton

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Followers
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Plays
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This is and will be a comprehensive examination of all matters aesthetic, all the arts and humanities and what it means to be human.From the internal process of makers and creators, we dive deep into all things arts and humanities.Become a patron on Patreon here: Become a Patron! As a subscriber, you have access to additional episodes, live podcast events and more, as our special thanks to you!

Latest Episodes

“Season Two: The Solo Episode with Mitch on the Mic or Where we are Now”

Mitch's Note on this episode: "As we find ourselves in the middle of Season Two of our podcast, Journey Of An Aesthete I thought I should like to record a second solo episode which I guess means me sitting in front of the microphone and speaking all alone with the listeners/audience. I always get really nervous with these episodes as, speaking historically I have done very little in the way of public speaking like this, by which I mean it has happened so infrequently that I don't feel as practiced as I should like - though this podcast itself is making up for lost time. It isn't that I have a phobia or fear of public speaking - in truth whenever I do it I feel at least moderately comfortable - it is just that it is a conviction of mine, whether founded or not, that one always does something best the more they have done it. I really don't know much about being a "natural" or whatever the term is. Alongside that vein I thought I would play just a little bit of piano, in this case the first (and in part the only) music I have committed to composing in the times since late March or early April. It promises to be a much longer piece, and aside from the somber tone of the opening that you will hear here, will have as many passages that are upbeat, even joyful in the fullness of the completed work. I gathered some selections to read on this, our second solo show. I always have a deep feeling of indebtedness to others, thinker and artists that have come before me and I always to try to utilize my show as a platform to honor them. When I am forced to talk about my own piano playing I always try and mention my debt to my teacher Stanley Cowell, to name but one example. But some influences are people whom I have never met; I only know the works authored by the creator, not the creator herself. I have always felt that "the work" this might be the "best" part of themselves, which, though might be controversial to say (even though daily news reports sort of confirm my theory. And I mean no disrespect to any family members or loved ones of artists who really feel that the artist in their life is really great as a human being, never mind what they have made or that they are also known in public). I read Elizabeth Bishop's One Art which for me is a truly perfect poem which is saying a lot. I then read one of the first life changing books I ever encountered, Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind, by Shunryu Suzukim book I was most fortunate to encounter at the age of 13 or 14 and which has accompanied me on just about every "stage" of my life until the present at age fifty-one. I do read it as a beautiful work of art, even poetry. I don't know if this is the correct or, in Suzuki's common formulation, the "right understanding" to read it in such a way but for what it's worth I also happen to think it accurate in many respects as a document of our daily lives, speaking in a broad register, thus making it in at least one instance a confirmation of Keat's proposition of Truth and Beauty being synonymous. The book Foregone Conclusions has a review from The New Republic that I uncovered from wayback in 1995: https://newrepublic.com/article/63010/the-illusion-fate The Frank Loesser letter is a hoot and very funny. Its prankish and insouciant tone I feel has some seriousness in calling into question our received categories of artistic evaluation more generally even as I am not now prepared to take on fully the "populism" (egalitarianism?) of Loesser's narrator in the letter. As far as the arts go, I have no caution. I love all of them without reservations, enthusiasm that I hope is expressed in episodes like this one.” Links to Mitch’s Body of work:Journey of an Aesthete Podcast http://themoderatecontrarian.blogspot.com https://mitchhampton.bandcamp.com https://www.patreon.com/journeyofanaesthete --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mitch-hampto

35 MIN1 w ago
Comments
“Season Two: The Solo Episode with Mitch on the Mic or Where we are Now”

Embracing every facet of music: A musical conversation with singer/songwriter and music educator Erin Kinard

From Mitch’s Notebook about the episode “As with some other guests, Erin Kinard is one who I have known personally, at least since the two years of living here in Weaverville. While I did know her for her singing as she has been a regular at Blue mountain here with just her and her guitar, and I did know her to possess both a truly beautiful voice and gift for songwriting there was much more. I did not know until later that she is the president of Girls Rock in North Carolina, is an instrument maker, plays drums, has her own rock duo Rooster, and probably a whole bunch of other things we never got a chance to even get to on this particular episode. We played together on a couple of the selections. I always enjoy the opportunity to really accompany someone and try and match their style the best that I can, particular when it is in a style of music that I don't often get to perform. True to the spirit of our podcast, Erin Kinard is somebody who does many kinds of things in music, never content to be pigeonholed or stick with one genre. Much like my episode with Bill Fouty, this one where we talked a bit about the nature of music making itself as an art and craft as well as play some numbers. I hope it is as enjoyable to listen to as it was for us to record it.” Erin’s Biography Erin Kinard Musician / community organizer / sign language interpreter Erin Kinard has been a member of the Asheville community since 2010 and a lifelong supporter of the arts. Born and raised in Charleston, she attended the Charleston County School of the Arts, studying dance and music. She earned her Bachelor of Arts in Music History at the College of Charleston. In 2014, Erin founded Girls Rock Asheville, a camp seeking to create more space for more women and girls in music. She currently serves on the board and council of Girls Rock Asheville. Erin earned an associates degree in Sign Language Interpreting from Blue Ridge Community College and has worked in this field in public school, spiritual and mental health settings. Since 2016, Erin has been playing drums and singing in the folk-rock duo, Rooster, with Annie Myers. In February of 2020, the band released an 11 song album of original music. Check their wonderful music out here: https://soundcloud.com/user-568520317/tracks Erin plays guitar and drums actively and also passively plays bass, piano, ukulele, mandolin, harmonica and whatever else she can find. Erin is a lifelong learner, lover of science and courageous adventurer. www.roostermusicavl.weebly.com www.girlsrockasheville.org --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mitch-hampton/message

76 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Embracing every facet of music: A musical conversation with singer/songwriter and music educator Erin Kinard

The MANU (Make American Nuanced Again) show, with Meghan Daum

From Mitch’s Notebook about the episode “Meghan Daum is somebody I became acquainted with as part of my ongoing love for creative non-fiction, the kind of prose that comes out of a meeting of literary criticism, personal memoir, the opinion column and essays, and some other genres thrown in for good measure. Reminiscent of Joan Didion, George W. S. Trow, and others, Daum's nonfiction writing is thoroughly independent: she is beholden to no fixed political point of view or ideology and is always open to the newness of experience and what life might throw at us tomorrow but never so open as to lose an indispensable, critical skepticism. Best and most of important of all, she is very funny and she is one of the best humorists in prose today.” Her latest, The Problem With Everything, is her take on the state of the world of the past four years or so and there is in a large sense no better guide to such matters than Meghan Daum.” Meghan’s Bio Meghan Daum is the author of six books, most recently THE PROBLEM WITH EVERYTHING: MY JOURNEY THROUGH THE NEW CULTURE WARS. A Los Angeles Times opinion columnist from 2005 to 2016, she is now a biweekly columnist for Medium’s GEN Magazine. She is the recipient of a 2015 Guggenheim Fellow and a 2016 NEA grant and is on the adjunct faculty of the Writing Division at Columbia University’s School of the Arts. She has written for numerous magazines, including The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, The Atlantic, and Vogue. Links to her body of work: Twitter: @meghan_daum Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Meghan-Daum-44319076324/ Website: www.meghandaum.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mitch-hampton/message

54 MINJUN 1
Comments
The MANU (Make American Nuanced Again) show, with Meghan Daum

"All About the Golden Age of the Made For T.V. Movie with Amanda Reyes

"All About the Golden Age of the Made For T.V. Movie with Amanda Reyes From Mitch’s Notebook about the episode: “One of many, in my view, most unwelcome developments in public commentary as of late are the explicit demarcations being made regarding culture - usually between the trivial and the essential, or between the irrelevant and the mandatory. The suppressed question then becomes, who gets decide where that line is and should we all fall in line? I am not suggesting that some works of art are not in fact better than others in all sorts of ways, but I am stating that those evaluations have little or nothing to do with the style of art and when, where, or how it was made. I have been a fan of Amanda Reyes' podcast, Made For T.V. Mayhem for sone time now and one of the many things I love about her show is that, for her, dramatic feature productions made for television in the 70s and 80s are never irrelevant and always valuable. Reyes is both a film and television historian and scholar as we all as a film archivist and thus it was a real joy to finally sit down with her and discuss some frankly forgotten gems that happened to have been made for the small screen over several decades. Is Night Terror (Night Drive) starring Valerie Harper dated or irrelevant? Since it is a film representing in frank terms a woman trying to find herself amidst an extreme situation, and since things like that do happen in life, for better and worse, we feel that that particular t.v. movie is always ever relevant. If you listen to our episode you might be inclined agree. We hope you enjoy our discussion as much as we did having it. I learned a lot from Amanda Reyes. Her mind moves very fast and I have to struggle to keep up with her, which in itself was lots of fun. She knows more about television and television history than anybody I have ever met and is a genuinely warm and engaging conversationalist. " Amanda Reyes is an archivist, author, film and television historian and academic. She edited and co-wrote Are You in the House Alone? A TV Movie Compendium: 1964-1999 (Headpress, 2017) which celebrates the made for television film, and was featured on Barnes and Noble’s Best of Horror list for 2017. She's been a guest speaker at international film festivals and conferences in such places as the UK, Australia, and the United States. She's also contributed commentary tracks for several made for television Blu-Ray and DVD releases, including the made for TV movies The Girl Most Likely To... (1973), Nightmare in Badham County (1976), Amazons (1984) and Death Dreams (1991), all of which were released through Kino Lorber in 2019. For 18 months, Amanda also curated a quarterly series of made for TV mystery screenings at the Alamo Drafthouse, and has hosted other screenings in conjunction with the Austin Film Society. When she has a moment, she also podcasts and blogs about anything vintage small screen. Made for TV Mayhem (blog): www.madefortvmayhem.com Made for TV Mayhem Show (podcast): www.tvmayhempodcast.wordpress.com Social media: Twitter: @madefortvmayhem https://twitter.com/madefortvmayhem Facebook: Made for TV Mayhem https://www.facebook.com/madefortvmayhem/ Instagram: @madefortvmayhem https://www.instagram.com/madefortvmayhem/ --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mitch-hampton/message

93 MINMAY 18
Comments
"All About the Golden Age of the Made For T.V. Movie with Amanda Reyes

“From 1470 to 2020, with a few stops in between: a musical conversation with bassist Bill Fouty "

Inside the Episode with Mitch Hampton “From 1470 to 2020, with a few stops in between: a musical conversation with bassist Bill Fouty " “Bill Fouty is one of the many fine musicians I have had the privilege to meet and work and play with over the years. He is an expert on the bass and I was quite overjoyed at the prospect of playing with him as he unearthed an actual cello from Italy in the year of 1470 (!) I had not known he was going to bring that particular instrument to our episode but bring it he did. Bill is one of those consummate musicians with whom I have been privileged to associate. He has an understanding of music and expression and has played the widest diversity of musical styles with proficiency and then some. He also has deep connections to the West Coast jazz scene of the 1960s through the 80s, a scene I have always admired for its own inimitable style. In my language, he knows "the changes." Our episode had a casual rehearsal type atmosphere. We did some things y...

67 MINMAY 4
Comments
“From 1470 to 2020, with a few stops in between: a musical conversation with bassist Bill Fouty "

"George Kateb: The Importance Of Attention"

From Mitch’s notebook about this episode: “I have always been almost as interested in certain topics like history and philosophy as much as the arts. The first time I encounters the name George Kateb was in a quite old book from the early 1990s where the phrase "positive alienation" was attributed to one George Kateb. More familiar with the word alienation as being (only) a pejorative the curiosity got the best of me and I wanted to find out what in the world a positive form of that would even look like. I eventually found myself basically reading (almost) everything the man has written .Kateb is perhaps unusual on our podcast in that he is specifically a political philosopher and not, say, a playwright, actor or musician. But if you dig a little deeper into his work, especially the fact that Emerson, that most aesthetic minded of American philosophers, was one of his biggest influences the choice of Kateb seems in every way a perfect one for Journey Of An Aesthete. I really enjoy...

87 MINAPR 20
Comments
"George Kateb: The Importance Of Attention"

Patreon Subscribers: A personal note from your host, Mr. Mitch Hampton about the extra perks of becoming a monthly subscriber to our show

A personal note from your host, Smith Hampton, about becoming a Patreon subscriber and what it means for you, and, to our show. Thanks for listening and please share our links with us~ https://anchor.fm/mitch-hampton The Journey of an Aesthete Podcast Team --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mitch-hampton/message

4 MINAPR 15
Comments
Patreon Subscribers: A personal note from your host, Mr. Mitch Hampton about the extra perks of becoming a monthly subscriber to our show

“Kindness and Diversity: A conversation and collaboration with poet and teacher Jane LeCroy”

From Mitch’s Notebook on the episode: “I aim to have guests of every stripe on my show. The reasons are many. Part of it is my conviction that the arts come in different mediums - visual and aural, for example. One of the other reasons (I am sure I will leave out or forget some reasons - there are many) is actually more idealistic. I actually think that people different from one another. even to a degree that we can say is profound, should have a seat at the same table, so to speak, in order to actually, well, speak. Some of my guests I know personally, others I have never met. My interest in alternative art spaces in general, particularly those spaces unafraid to mix sometimes radical politics and aesthetics, brought me into contact with Jane LeCroy, I believe, if memory serves, because we shared the bill on one event or another in Manhattan. I have always enjoyed collaborating with her because I am able to have a maximum of musical freedom, especially improvisation, while being ...

72 MINAPR 6
Comments
“Kindness and Diversity: A conversation and collaboration with poet and teacher Jane LeCroy”

“ Movie Talk with Mike White”

In this episode I discuss with Mike White his movie podcast The Projection Booth, the movies he loves, his approach to interviews and podcasting and all matters of cinephilia." "Movie Talk with Mike White” From Mitch’s notebook on the episode: “I first discovered Mike White through his wonderful cinema podcast, The Projection Booth. There are two reasons I love it, and I am speaking as a cinephile, I hasten to say. One is that he has really long form explorations of single films, thus treating the films as artistic texts to be taken seriously, in terms of analysis. There is no cute thumbs up.thumbs down brevity. Secondly, he does this from the perspective of a regular guy/gal. That is, he exhibits the joy and love for cinema of people who are not necessarily academic experts while at the same time delving deep into film as an art. Thus, he achieves a balance rarely found in discussions of this kind. Also I really appreciate his civility. He always talks with guests in the most gr...

95 MINMAR 23
Comments
“ Movie Talk with Mike White”

“Jon Stepp: The Value Of the Handcrafted”

Inside the Episode with Mitch Hampton “Jon Stepp: The Value Of the Handcrafted” From Mitch’s Notebook about the episode: “ I first became acquainted with Jon Stepp more for the joy of conversation with him than for any particular knowledge of his artistic practice. Later I was to discover that he was a visual artist in all sorts of media and was quite eloquent in expressing what it means for him to do his art. It is true that many artists are not always the most articulate on such matters perhaps for reasons of psychological introversion as much as the strength that visual artists have which, of course is not the same as prose of speech of course. One my cardinal rules on Journey Of An Aesthete is that if you can and are willing to talk about your artistic practice you are most welcome to do so and I'd love to have you as a guest. For me there is an inherent interest and value in having a oral record of the artist in their own voice. And the proof has been in the listening on my...

83 MINMAR 11
Comments
“Jon Stepp: The Value Of the Handcrafted”

Latest Episodes

“Season Two: The Solo Episode with Mitch on the Mic or Where we are Now”

Mitch's Note on this episode: "As we find ourselves in the middle of Season Two of our podcast, Journey Of An Aesthete I thought I should like to record a second solo episode which I guess means me sitting in front of the microphone and speaking all alone with the listeners/audience. I always get really nervous with these episodes as, speaking historically I have done very little in the way of public speaking like this, by which I mean it has happened so infrequently that I don't feel as practiced as I should like - though this podcast itself is making up for lost time. It isn't that I have a phobia or fear of public speaking - in truth whenever I do it I feel at least moderately comfortable - it is just that it is a conviction of mine, whether founded or not, that one always does something best the more they have done it. I really don't know much about being a "natural" or whatever the term is. Alongside that vein I thought I would play just a little bit of piano, in this case the first (and in part the only) music I have committed to composing in the times since late March or early April. It promises to be a much longer piece, and aside from the somber tone of the opening that you will hear here, will have as many passages that are upbeat, even joyful in the fullness of the completed work. I gathered some selections to read on this, our second solo show. I always have a deep feeling of indebtedness to others, thinker and artists that have come before me and I always to try to utilize my show as a platform to honor them. When I am forced to talk about my own piano playing I always try and mention my debt to my teacher Stanley Cowell, to name but one example. But some influences are people whom I have never met; I only know the works authored by the creator, not the creator herself. I have always felt that "the work" this might be the "best" part of themselves, which, though might be controversial to say (even though daily news reports sort of confirm my theory. And I mean no disrespect to any family members or loved ones of artists who really feel that the artist in their life is really great as a human being, never mind what they have made or that they are also known in public). I read Elizabeth Bishop's One Art which for me is a truly perfect poem which is saying a lot. I then read one of the first life changing books I ever encountered, Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind, by Shunryu Suzukim book I was most fortunate to encounter at the age of 13 or 14 and which has accompanied me on just about every "stage" of my life until the present at age fifty-one. I do read it as a beautiful work of art, even poetry. I don't know if this is the correct or, in Suzuki's common formulation, the "right understanding" to read it in such a way but for what it's worth I also happen to think it accurate in many respects as a document of our daily lives, speaking in a broad register, thus making it in at least one instance a confirmation of Keat's proposition of Truth and Beauty being synonymous. The book Foregone Conclusions has a review from The New Republic that I uncovered from wayback in 1995: https://newrepublic.com/article/63010/the-illusion-fate The Frank Loesser letter is a hoot and very funny. Its prankish and insouciant tone I feel has some seriousness in calling into question our received categories of artistic evaluation more generally even as I am not now prepared to take on fully the "populism" (egalitarianism?) of Loesser's narrator in the letter. As far as the arts go, I have no caution. I love all of them without reservations, enthusiasm that I hope is expressed in episodes like this one.” Links to Mitch’s Body of work:Journey of an Aesthete Podcast http://themoderatecontrarian.blogspot.com https://mitchhampton.bandcamp.com https://www.patreon.com/journeyofanaesthete --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mitch-hampto

35 MIN1 w ago
Comments
“Season Two: The Solo Episode with Mitch on the Mic or Where we are Now”

Embracing every facet of music: A musical conversation with singer/songwriter and music educator Erin Kinard

From Mitch’s Notebook about the episode “As with some other guests, Erin Kinard is one who I have known personally, at least since the two years of living here in Weaverville. While I did know her for her singing as she has been a regular at Blue mountain here with just her and her guitar, and I did know her to possess both a truly beautiful voice and gift for songwriting there was much more. I did not know until later that she is the president of Girls Rock in North Carolina, is an instrument maker, plays drums, has her own rock duo Rooster, and probably a whole bunch of other things we never got a chance to even get to on this particular episode. We played together on a couple of the selections. I always enjoy the opportunity to really accompany someone and try and match their style the best that I can, particular when it is in a style of music that I don't often get to perform. True to the spirit of our podcast, Erin Kinard is somebody who does many kinds of things in music, never content to be pigeonholed or stick with one genre. Much like my episode with Bill Fouty, this one where we talked a bit about the nature of music making itself as an art and craft as well as play some numbers. I hope it is as enjoyable to listen to as it was for us to record it.” Erin’s Biography Erin Kinard Musician / community organizer / sign language interpreter Erin Kinard has been a member of the Asheville community since 2010 and a lifelong supporter of the arts. Born and raised in Charleston, she attended the Charleston County School of the Arts, studying dance and music. She earned her Bachelor of Arts in Music History at the College of Charleston. In 2014, Erin founded Girls Rock Asheville, a camp seeking to create more space for more women and girls in music. She currently serves on the board and council of Girls Rock Asheville. Erin earned an associates degree in Sign Language Interpreting from Blue Ridge Community College and has worked in this field in public school, spiritual and mental health settings. Since 2016, Erin has been playing drums and singing in the folk-rock duo, Rooster, with Annie Myers. In February of 2020, the band released an 11 song album of original music. Check their wonderful music out here: https://soundcloud.com/user-568520317/tracks Erin plays guitar and drums actively and also passively plays bass, piano, ukulele, mandolin, harmonica and whatever else she can find. Erin is a lifelong learner, lover of science and courageous adventurer. www.roostermusicavl.weebly.com www.girlsrockasheville.org --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mitch-hampton/message

76 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Embracing every facet of music: A musical conversation with singer/songwriter and music educator Erin Kinard

The MANU (Make American Nuanced Again) show, with Meghan Daum

From Mitch’s Notebook about the episode “Meghan Daum is somebody I became acquainted with as part of my ongoing love for creative non-fiction, the kind of prose that comes out of a meeting of literary criticism, personal memoir, the opinion column and essays, and some other genres thrown in for good measure. Reminiscent of Joan Didion, George W. S. Trow, and others, Daum's nonfiction writing is thoroughly independent: she is beholden to no fixed political point of view or ideology and is always open to the newness of experience and what life might throw at us tomorrow but never so open as to lose an indispensable, critical skepticism. Best and most of important of all, she is very funny and she is one of the best humorists in prose today.” Her latest, The Problem With Everything, is her take on the state of the world of the past four years or so and there is in a large sense no better guide to such matters than Meghan Daum.” Meghan’s Bio Meghan Daum is the author of six books, most recently THE PROBLEM WITH EVERYTHING: MY JOURNEY THROUGH THE NEW CULTURE WARS. A Los Angeles Times opinion columnist from 2005 to 2016, she is now a biweekly columnist for Medium’s GEN Magazine. She is the recipient of a 2015 Guggenheim Fellow and a 2016 NEA grant and is on the adjunct faculty of the Writing Division at Columbia University’s School of the Arts. She has written for numerous magazines, including The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, The Atlantic, and Vogue. Links to her body of work: Twitter: @meghan_daum Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Meghan-Daum-44319076324/ Website: www.meghandaum.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mitch-hampton/message

54 MINJUN 1
Comments
The MANU (Make American Nuanced Again) show, with Meghan Daum

"All About the Golden Age of the Made For T.V. Movie with Amanda Reyes

"All About the Golden Age of the Made For T.V. Movie with Amanda Reyes From Mitch’s Notebook about the episode: “One of many, in my view, most unwelcome developments in public commentary as of late are the explicit demarcations being made regarding culture - usually between the trivial and the essential, or between the irrelevant and the mandatory. The suppressed question then becomes, who gets decide where that line is and should we all fall in line? I am not suggesting that some works of art are not in fact better than others in all sorts of ways, but I am stating that those evaluations have little or nothing to do with the style of art and when, where, or how it was made. I have been a fan of Amanda Reyes' podcast, Made For T.V. Mayhem for sone time now and one of the many things I love about her show is that, for her, dramatic feature productions made for television in the 70s and 80s are never irrelevant and always valuable. Reyes is both a film and television historian and scholar as we all as a film archivist and thus it was a real joy to finally sit down with her and discuss some frankly forgotten gems that happened to have been made for the small screen over several decades. Is Night Terror (Night Drive) starring Valerie Harper dated or irrelevant? Since it is a film representing in frank terms a woman trying to find herself amidst an extreme situation, and since things like that do happen in life, for better and worse, we feel that that particular t.v. movie is always ever relevant. If you listen to our episode you might be inclined agree. We hope you enjoy our discussion as much as we did having it. I learned a lot from Amanda Reyes. Her mind moves very fast and I have to struggle to keep up with her, which in itself was lots of fun. She knows more about television and television history than anybody I have ever met and is a genuinely warm and engaging conversationalist. " Amanda Reyes is an archivist, author, film and television historian and academic. She edited and co-wrote Are You in the House Alone? A TV Movie Compendium: 1964-1999 (Headpress, 2017) which celebrates the made for television film, and was featured on Barnes and Noble’s Best of Horror list for 2017. She's been a guest speaker at international film festivals and conferences in such places as the UK, Australia, and the United States. She's also contributed commentary tracks for several made for television Blu-Ray and DVD releases, including the made for TV movies The Girl Most Likely To... (1973), Nightmare in Badham County (1976), Amazons (1984) and Death Dreams (1991), all of which were released through Kino Lorber in 2019. For 18 months, Amanda also curated a quarterly series of made for TV mystery screenings at the Alamo Drafthouse, and has hosted other screenings in conjunction with the Austin Film Society. When she has a moment, she also podcasts and blogs about anything vintage small screen. Made for TV Mayhem (blog): www.madefortvmayhem.com Made for TV Mayhem Show (podcast): www.tvmayhempodcast.wordpress.com Social media: Twitter: @madefortvmayhem https://twitter.com/madefortvmayhem Facebook: Made for TV Mayhem https://www.facebook.com/madefortvmayhem/ Instagram: @madefortvmayhem https://www.instagram.com/madefortvmayhem/ --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mitch-hampton/message

93 MINMAY 18
Comments
"All About the Golden Age of the Made For T.V. Movie with Amanda Reyes

“From 1470 to 2020, with a few stops in between: a musical conversation with bassist Bill Fouty "

Inside the Episode with Mitch Hampton “From 1470 to 2020, with a few stops in between: a musical conversation with bassist Bill Fouty " “Bill Fouty is one of the many fine musicians I have had the privilege to meet and work and play with over the years. He is an expert on the bass and I was quite overjoyed at the prospect of playing with him as he unearthed an actual cello from Italy in the year of 1470 (!) I had not known he was going to bring that particular instrument to our episode but bring it he did. Bill is one of those consummate musicians with whom I have been privileged to associate. He has an understanding of music and expression and has played the widest diversity of musical styles with proficiency and then some. He also has deep connections to the West Coast jazz scene of the 1960s through the 80s, a scene I have always admired for its own inimitable style. In my language, he knows "the changes." Our episode had a casual rehearsal type atmosphere. We did some things y...

67 MINMAY 4
Comments
“From 1470 to 2020, with a few stops in between: a musical conversation with bassist Bill Fouty "

"George Kateb: The Importance Of Attention"

From Mitch’s notebook about this episode: “I have always been almost as interested in certain topics like history and philosophy as much as the arts. The first time I encounters the name George Kateb was in a quite old book from the early 1990s where the phrase "positive alienation" was attributed to one George Kateb. More familiar with the word alienation as being (only) a pejorative the curiosity got the best of me and I wanted to find out what in the world a positive form of that would even look like. I eventually found myself basically reading (almost) everything the man has written .Kateb is perhaps unusual on our podcast in that he is specifically a political philosopher and not, say, a playwright, actor or musician. But if you dig a little deeper into his work, especially the fact that Emerson, that most aesthetic minded of American philosophers, was one of his biggest influences the choice of Kateb seems in every way a perfect one for Journey Of An Aesthete. I really enjoy...

87 MINAPR 20
Comments
"George Kateb: The Importance Of Attention"

Patreon Subscribers: A personal note from your host, Mr. Mitch Hampton about the extra perks of becoming a monthly subscriber to our show

A personal note from your host, Smith Hampton, about becoming a Patreon subscriber and what it means for you, and, to our show. Thanks for listening and please share our links with us~ https://anchor.fm/mitch-hampton The Journey of an Aesthete Podcast Team --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mitch-hampton/message

4 MINAPR 15
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Patreon Subscribers: A personal note from your host, Mr. Mitch Hampton about the extra perks of becoming a monthly subscriber to our show

“Kindness and Diversity: A conversation and collaboration with poet and teacher Jane LeCroy”

From Mitch’s Notebook on the episode: “I aim to have guests of every stripe on my show. The reasons are many. Part of it is my conviction that the arts come in different mediums - visual and aural, for example. One of the other reasons (I am sure I will leave out or forget some reasons - there are many) is actually more idealistic. I actually think that people different from one another. even to a degree that we can say is profound, should have a seat at the same table, so to speak, in order to actually, well, speak. Some of my guests I know personally, others I have never met. My interest in alternative art spaces in general, particularly those spaces unafraid to mix sometimes radical politics and aesthetics, brought me into contact with Jane LeCroy, I believe, if memory serves, because we shared the bill on one event or another in Manhattan. I have always enjoyed collaborating with her because I am able to have a maximum of musical freedom, especially improvisation, while being ...

72 MINAPR 6
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“Kindness and Diversity: A conversation and collaboration with poet and teacher Jane LeCroy”

“ Movie Talk with Mike White”

In this episode I discuss with Mike White his movie podcast The Projection Booth, the movies he loves, his approach to interviews and podcasting and all matters of cinephilia." "Movie Talk with Mike White” From Mitch’s notebook on the episode: “I first discovered Mike White through his wonderful cinema podcast, The Projection Booth. There are two reasons I love it, and I am speaking as a cinephile, I hasten to say. One is that he has really long form explorations of single films, thus treating the films as artistic texts to be taken seriously, in terms of analysis. There is no cute thumbs up.thumbs down brevity. Secondly, he does this from the perspective of a regular guy/gal. That is, he exhibits the joy and love for cinema of people who are not necessarily academic experts while at the same time delving deep into film as an art. Thus, he achieves a balance rarely found in discussions of this kind. Also I really appreciate his civility. He always talks with guests in the most gr...

95 MINMAR 23
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“ Movie Talk with Mike White”

“Jon Stepp: The Value Of the Handcrafted”

Inside the Episode with Mitch Hampton “Jon Stepp: The Value Of the Handcrafted” From Mitch’s Notebook about the episode: “ I first became acquainted with Jon Stepp more for the joy of conversation with him than for any particular knowledge of his artistic practice. Later I was to discover that he was a visual artist in all sorts of media and was quite eloquent in expressing what it means for him to do his art. It is true that many artists are not always the most articulate on such matters perhaps for reasons of psychological introversion as much as the strength that visual artists have which, of course is not the same as prose of speech of course. One my cardinal rules on Journey Of An Aesthete is that if you can and are willing to talk about your artistic practice you are most welcome to do so and I'd love to have you as a guest. For me there is an inherent interest and value in having a oral record of the artist in their own voice. And the proof has been in the listening on my...

83 MINMAR 11
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“Jon Stepp: The Value Of the Handcrafted”
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