title

Literary Hangover

Matthew Lech

18
Followers
77
Plays
Literary Hangover

Literary Hangover

Matthew Lech

18
Followers
77
Plays
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About Us

Literary Hangover is a podcast, released twice on Saturdays each month, in which Matt Lech and his friends chat about fiction and the historical, social, and political forces behind the creation of it and represented by it.

Latest Episodes

33 - 'The History of Colonel Nathaniel Bacon's Rebellion' by Ebenezer Cook (1728)

This is the free Literary Hangover feed. To support the show and access the premium episodes on George Orwell (Orwell|er), become a Patron at Patreon.com/LiteraryHangover Alex and I return with another poem from the poet laureat of colonial Maryland, Ebenezer Cook, this time his narrative of Bacon's Rebellion(pdf). How memory-holed is Bacon's Rebellion? The false promise of promotional literature and the headright system. Economic anxiety and indian hating. Trade disputes, theft, jurisdiction, and the start of the rebellion. Bacon seeing no difference between friend and enemy indians. The spectre of Cromwell. George Washington's great grandfather: war criminal. Nathaniel Bacon, failson, scammer, world-traveler. Defense spending boondoggles and paying your taxes in tobacco. Selling guns to indians. Bacon's alliance/battle with Posseclay and the Occaneechees. Who's side is Cook on? Bacon uses loyalist women as a human shield, is more "Blue Lives Matter" than DSA. Bacon's bloody flux and his surviving rebellion. The merchant, Captain Grantham's, dirty trick. @Alecks_Guns, @MattLech @LitHangover References: Rice, James D. 2012. Tales from a revolution: Bacon's Rebellion and the transformation of early America. New York City: Oxford University Press. Schmidt, Ethan A. 2016. The divided dominion: social conflict and Indian hatred in early Virginia. Washburn, Wilcomb E. 1972. The Governor and the rebel; a history of Bacon's Rebellion in Virginia. New York: Norton.

147 MIN1 w ago
Comments
33 - 'The History of Colonel Nathaniel Bacon's Rebellion' by Ebenezer Cook (1728)

Reading 'The Sot-Weed Factor' by Ebenezer Cook (1708)

This is the free Literary Hangover feed. To support the show and access the premium episodes on George Orwell (Orwell|er), become a Patron at Patreon.com/LiteraryHangover Here's my reading of the satirical poem, The Sot-weed Factor: or, A Voyage to Maryland, by Ebenezer Cook (1708), as discussed in episode 32. Thanks for your support.

32 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Reading 'The Sot-Weed Factor' by Ebenezer Cook (1708)

32 - 'The Sot-Weed Factor: Or, A Voyage To Maryland' by Ebenezer Cook (1708)

This is the free Literary Hangover feed. To support the show and access the premium episodes on George Orwell (Orwell|er), become a Patron at Patreon.com/LiteraryHangover Alex and I discuss Ebenezer Cook's 1708 poem "The Sot-Weed Factor." The scant documentation we have for Cook's life. Cooks use of hudibrastic tetrameter and couplets. Who were the Chesapeake tobacco proletariat? The cheap linen clothing of American workers. Nationalism and Benedict Anderson's "Imagined Communities." The Cain myth and racial othering. Queen Elizabeth I's racism and how England created a labor force for the colonies. America as a giant labor camp. Humanity's timeless love for dick jokes. The Annapolis legal swamp. "Going native." The imperial motivation for determining how Indians came to America. Card-playing witches. Hangover remedies. Getting scammed by a Quaker. @Alecks_Guns, @MattLech @LitHangover References: Full poem here: http://theotherpages.org/poems/cook02.html Gregory A. Carey, "The Poem ...

93 MINJAN 12
Comments
32 - 'The Sot-Weed Factor: Or, A Voyage To Maryland' by Ebenezer Cook (1708)

31 - 'The Pilgrim's Progress' by John Bunyan (1678)

This is the free Literary Hangover feed. To support the show and access the premium episodes on George Orwell (Orwell|er), become a Patron at Patreon.com/LiteraryHangover Alex and Matt return this week to discuss John Bunyan's 1678 work of allegorical fiction, 'The Pilgrim's Progress.' The significance of Pilgrim's Progress in anglo mythology. Bunyan's proletarian background. Why does Pilgrim's Progress remind us to hate our family, John Bunyan vs. against and civility. Bunyan choosing prison over selling out for the sake of being with his family. Coolio and walking in the Shadow of the Valley of Death. More anti-Catholicism. Wanton women Vanity Fair and Bunyan's ability to write in prison. Bunyan's traumatic relationship with documentation. @Alecks_Guns, @MattLech @LitHangover References: Excellent narration of the full text from Aneko Press: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dMtmnv84GxY&t=20433s Pilgrim's Progress, by John Bunyan. ''IntelliQuest World's 100 Greatest Books'' 1995 htt...

125 MIN2019 DEC 22
Comments
31 - 'The Pilgrim's Progress' by John Bunyan (1678)

30 - 'The Crucible' by Arthur Miller (1953)

Today, Alex, Grace, and Matt talk about Arthur Miller's 1953 play 'The Crucible' and its Salem Witch Trial and McCarthyite contexts. Miller in 1992 on why the market is failing theater and why the state needs to sponsor it. Arthur Miller, fellow-travelling and the House Un-American Activities Committee. Early witch culture that likely influenced the girls' performances/delusions. Samuel Parris fails at life, squanders fathers' plantation fortune. Tituba was more indigenous than black, and didn't introduce witchcraft to the community. The Putnam family and the rural/urban, agricultural/commercial divide. Abigail and Marilyn Monroe. How his relationship with Marilyn Monroe made Miller a target for HUAC. Hale and the limits of ideology. Proctor and the propaganda value of a name. @Alecks_Guns, @GraceJackson, @MattLech @LitHangover Act One of The Crucible here: https://youtu.be/Dtr9RGeHnPM References: An Unofficial Cultural Ambassador - Arthur Miller and the Cultural Cold War. Abrams, N...

161 MIN2019 DEC 1
Comments
30 - 'The Crucible' by Arthur Miller (1953)

29 - 'Oroonoko: or, the Royal Slave' by Aphra Behn (1688)

This is the free Literary Hangover feed. To support the show and access the premium episodes on George Orwell (Orwell|er), become a Patron at Patreon.com/LiteraryHangover Grace joins Alex and Matt once again to discuss Oroonoko: or, the Royal Slave, published in 1688. The eponymous hero is an African prince from Coramantien who is tricked into slavery and sold to British colonists in Surinam where he meets the narrator. Behn's text is a first-person account of his life, love, rebellion, and execution. Written by Aphra Behn, who was - in addition to being a spy, feminist, monarchist, and original tory - the first professional female writer. @Alecks_Guns, @GraceJackson, @MattLech @LitHangover References: BBC's In Our Time podcast on Aphra Behn: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cnVkzdCOu7Q&t=1822s Oroonoko and the Rise of the Novel by William Smith on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=htVteRU9450 Todd, Janet. 1998. The Critical Fortunes of Aphra Behn. Columbia, SC: Camden House. ...

114 MIN2019 NOV 16
Comments
29 - 'Oroonoko: or, the Royal Slave' by Aphra Behn (1688)

28 - The Salem Witch Trials

Alex and Matt return, this time to discuss the social, political and material origins of the Salem Witch Trials. Indian and imperial war trauma in the late 1600s. The Glorious Revolution and the coup of Andros by puritan leaders in Massachusetts. The economic divide between mercantile Salem Town and the agricultural offshoot that was ground zero for the outbreak, Salem Village. Increase and Cotton Mather's responsibility in spreading belief in witches. The difference between witch hunts and awakenings being in the interpretation of adults. Gender and witch accusations. George Burrough's perfect recitation of the Lord's prayer. Sleep paralysis, conversion disorder, and fraud as all explanations for the witch accusations. Cotton Mather's damage control for the Puritan theocracy, The Wonders of the Invisible World. European witch history. @Alecks_Guns, @MattLech @LitHangover References: Baker, Emerson W. 2016. Storm of Witchcraft: The Salem Trials and the American Experience. New York:...

133 MIN2019 OCT 27
Comments
28 - The Salem Witch Trials

27 - 'Hobomok: A Tale of Early Times' by Lydia Maria Child (1824)

This is the free Literary Hangover feed. To support the show and access the premium episodes on George Orwell (Orwell|er), become a Patron at Patreon.com/LiteraryHangover Hey LitHangers! Matt's solo this week with an introduction to the first novel by one of the 19th century's "social justice warriors" named Lydia Maria Child. Hobomok can be seen as a precursor to Hope Leslie (1827), and is an interesting book in its own right that takes 'other' natives, deviant colonial men, and colonial women from the periphery to the center of the narrative. References: Dr. Cornel West on the Joe Rogan Experience (relevent portion at 1h02m) Child, Lydia Maria; Carolyn L. Karcher. 2011. Hobomok and Other Writings on Indians. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press. Karcher, Carolyn L. 2012. The First Woman in the Republic A Cultural Biography of Lydia Maria Child. Durham: Duke University Press. The American History Podcast. Plymouth 7: The Lyford Affair. Posted on April 10, 2018

91 MIN2019 SEP 28
Comments
27 - 'Hobomok: A Tale of Early Times' by Lydia Maria Child (1824)

26 - 'The Pioneers' by James Fenimore Cooper (1823) - Part 2

This is the free Literary Hangover feed. To support the show and access the premium episodes on George Orwell (Orwell|er), become a Patron at Patreon.com/LiteraryHangover Alex and Matt return to finish James Fenimore Cooper's "The Pioneers." The relationship between colonization and racism. Submerged nobility in Cooper's fiction. How American colonization really took off after 1776. Turkey shoots and how Natty calling Cooper's first non-slave black character the N-word illustrates the work of Frantz Fanon. Passenger pigeons as the east coast's bison and how cops like to useold military equipment. Natty's principled opposition to surplus. Marmaduke Temple's elite conservationism. Places not described in books. Economic espionage by the new sheriff. Kirby as the urban, proletarian Natty. Why jailbreaks were indeed common in the real life Cooperstown. Marmaduke Temple's double-dipping on behalf of the Effinghams. @Alecks_Guns, @MattLech @LitHangover Sources: Librivox's recording of The...

105 MIN2019 SEP 8
Comments
26 - 'The Pioneers' by James Fenimore Cooper (1823) - Part 2

25 - 'The Pioneers' by James Fenimore Cooper (1823) - Part 1

This is the free Literary Hangover feed. To support the show and access the premium episodes on George Orwell (Orwell|er), become a Patron at Patreon.com/LiteraryHangover Alex and I discuss the underrated first novel of James Fenimore Cooper's 'Leatherstocking Tales,' ***The Pioneers, or The Sources of the Susquehanna; a Descriptive Tale. ***We discuss James' father 'self- made' landlord father, William, who settled central New York after obtaining massive amounts of land following the flux of the American Revolution. William and James, slaveowners. Coopers lamentable race science fixation and commendable proto-Marxist materialism. Judge Temple as the first Dick Cheney. The American frontier myth. Maple trees as short-term and long-term commodities. No settlements without commodification. Environmentalism as a test of gentility. Maple sugar: the market solution to carribbean sugar slavery. @Alecks_Guns, @MattLech @LitHangover Sources: Barbara Mann and Alan Taylor, April 23, 2001. Wr...

138 MIN2019 JUL 28
Comments
25 - 'The Pioneers' by James Fenimore Cooper (1823) - Part 1

Latest Episodes

33 - 'The History of Colonel Nathaniel Bacon's Rebellion' by Ebenezer Cook (1728)

This is the free Literary Hangover feed. To support the show and access the premium episodes on George Orwell (Orwell|er), become a Patron at Patreon.com/LiteraryHangover Alex and I return with another poem from the poet laureat of colonial Maryland, Ebenezer Cook, this time his narrative of Bacon's Rebellion(pdf). How memory-holed is Bacon's Rebellion? The false promise of promotional literature and the headright system. Economic anxiety and indian hating. Trade disputes, theft, jurisdiction, and the start of the rebellion. Bacon seeing no difference between friend and enemy indians. The spectre of Cromwell. George Washington's great grandfather: war criminal. Nathaniel Bacon, failson, scammer, world-traveler. Defense spending boondoggles and paying your taxes in tobacco. Selling guns to indians. Bacon's alliance/battle with Posseclay and the Occaneechees. Who's side is Cook on? Bacon uses loyalist women as a human shield, is more "Blue Lives Matter" than DSA. Bacon's bloody flux and his surviving rebellion. The merchant, Captain Grantham's, dirty trick. @Alecks_Guns, @MattLech @LitHangover References: Rice, James D. 2012. Tales from a revolution: Bacon's Rebellion and the transformation of early America. New York City: Oxford University Press. Schmidt, Ethan A. 2016. The divided dominion: social conflict and Indian hatred in early Virginia. Washburn, Wilcomb E. 1972. The Governor and the rebel; a history of Bacon's Rebellion in Virginia. New York: Norton.

147 MIN1 w ago
Comments
33 - 'The History of Colonel Nathaniel Bacon's Rebellion' by Ebenezer Cook (1728)

Reading 'The Sot-Weed Factor' by Ebenezer Cook (1708)

This is the free Literary Hangover feed. To support the show and access the premium episodes on George Orwell (Orwell|er), become a Patron at Patreon.com/LiteraryHangover Here's my reading of the satirical poem, The Sot-weed Factor: or, A Voyage to Maryland, by Ebenezer Cook (1708), as discussed in episode 32. Thanks for your support.

32 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Reading 'The Sot-Weed Factor' by Ebenezer Cook (1708)

32 - 'The Sot-Weed Factor: Or, A Voyage To Maryland' by Ebenezer Cook (1708)

This is the free Literary Hangover feed. To support the show and access the premium episodes on George Orwell (Orwell|er), become a Patron at Patreon.com/LiteraryHangover Alex and I discuss Ebenezer Cook's 1708 poem "The Sot-Weed Factor." The scant documentation we have for Cook's life. Cooks use of hudibrastic tetrameter and couplets. Who were the Chesapeake tobacco proletariat? The cheap linen clothing of American workers. Nationalism and Benedict Anderson's "Imagined Communities." The Cain myth and racial othering. Queen Elizabeth I's racism and how England created a labor force for the colonies. America as a giant labor camp. Humanity's timeless love for dick jokes. The Annapolis legal swamp. "Going native." The imperial motivation for determining how Indians came to America. Card-playing witches. Hangover remedies. Getting scammed by a Quaker. @Alecks_Guns, @MattLech @LitHangover References: Full poem here: http://theotherpages.org/poems/cook02.html Gregory A. Carey, "The Poem ...

93 MINJAN 12
Comments
32 - 'The Sot-Weed Factor: Or, A Voyage To Maryland' by Ebenezer Cook (1708)

31 - 'The Pilgrim's Progress' by John Bunyan (1678)

This is the free Literary Hangover feed. To support the show and access the premium episodes on George Orwell (Orwell|er), become a Patron at Patreon.com/LiteraryHangover Alex and Matt return this week to discuss John Bunyan's 1678 work of allegorical fiction, 'The Pilgrim's Progress.' The significance of Pilgrim's Progress in anglo mythology. Bunyan's proletarian background. Why does Pilgrim's Progress remind us to hate our family, John Bunyan vs. against and civility. Bunyan choosing prison over selling out for the sake of being with his family. Coolio and walking in the Shadow of the Valley of Death. More anti-Catholicism. Wanton women Vanity Fair and Bunyan's ability to write in prison. Bunyan's traumatic relationship with documentation. @Alecks_Guns, @MattLech @LitHangover References: Excellent narration of the full text from Aneko Press: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dMtmnv84GxY&t=20433s Pilgrim's Progress, by John Bunyan. ''IntelliQuest World's 100 Greatest Books'' 1995 htt...

125 MIN2019 DEC 22
Comments
31 - 'The Pilgrim's Progress' by John Bunyan (1678)

30 - 'The Crucible' by Arthur Miller (1953)

Today, Alex, Grace, and Matt talk about Arthur Miller's 1953 play 'The Crucible' and its Salem Witch Trial and McCarthyite contexts. Miller in 1992 on why the market is failing theater and why the state needs to sponsor it. Arthur Miller, fellow-travelling and the House Un-American Activities Committee. Early witch culture that likely influenced the girls' performances/delusions. Samuel Parris fails at life, squanders fathers' plantation fortune. Tituba was more indigenous than black, and didn't introduce witchcraft to the community. The Putnam family and the rural/urban, agricultural/commercial divide. Abigail and Marilyn Monroe. How his relationship with Marilyn Monroe made Miller a target for HUAC. Hale and the limits of ideology. Proctor and the propaganda value of a name. @Alecks_Guns, @GraceJackson, @MattLech @LitHangover Act One of The Crucible here: https://youtu.be/Dtr9RGeHnPM References: An Unofficial Cultural Ambassador - Arthur Miller and the Cultural Cold War. Abrams, N...

161 MIN2019 DEC 1
Comments
30 - 'The Crucible' by Arthur Miller (1953)

29 - 'Oroonoko: or, the Royal Slave' by Aphra Behn (1688)

This is the free Literary Hangover feed. To support the show and access the premium episodes on George Orwell (Orwell|er), become a Patron at Patreon.com/LiteraryHangover Grace joins Alex and Matt once again to discuss Oroonoko: or, the Royal Slave, published in 1688. The eponymous hero is an African prince from Coramantien who is tricked into slavery and sold to British colonists in Surinam where he meets the narrator. Behn's text is a first-person account of his life, love, rebellion, and execution. Written by Aphra Behn, who was - in addition to being a spy, feminist, monarchist, and original tory - the first professional female writer. @Alecks_Guns, @GraceJackson, @MattLech @LitHangover References: BBC's In Our Time podcast on Aphra Behn: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cnVkzdCOu7Q&t=1822s Oroonoko and the Rise of the Novel by William Smith on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=htVteRU9450 Todd, Janet. 1998. The Critical Fortunes of Aphra Behn. Columbia, SC: Camden House. ...

114 MIN2019 NOV 16
Comments
29 - 'Oroonoko: or, the Royal Slave' by Aphra Behn (1688)

28 - The Salem Witch Trials

Alex and Matt return, this time to discuss the social, political and material origins of the Salem Witch Trials. Indian and imperial war trauma in the late 1600s. The Glorious Revolution and the coup of Andros by puritan leaders in Massachusetts. The economic divide between mercantile Salem Town and the agricultural offshoot that was ground zero for the outbreak, Salem Village. Increase and Cotton Mather's responsibility in spreading belief in witches. The difference between witch hunts and awakenings being in the interpretation of adults. Gender and witch accusations. George Burrough's perfect recitation of the Lord's prayer. Sleep paralysis, conversion disorder, and fraud as all explanations for the witch accusations. Cotton Mather's damage control for the Puritan theocracy, The Wonders of the Invisible World. European witch history. @Alecks_Guns, @MattLech @LitHangover References: Baker, Emerson W. 2016. Storm of Witchcraft: The Salem Trials and the American Experience. New York:...

133 MIN2019 OCT 27
Comments
28 - The Salem Witch Trials

27 - 'Hobomok: A Tale of Early Times' by Lydia Maria Child (1824)

This is the free Literary Hangover feed. To support the show and access the premium episodes on George Orwell (Orwell|er), become a Patron at Patreon.com/LiteraryHangover Hey LitHangers! Matt's solo this week with an introduction to the first novel by one of the 19th century's "social justice warriors" named Lydia Maria Child. Hobomok can be seen as a precursor to Hope Leslie (1827), and is an interesting book in its own right that takes 'other' natives, deviant colonial men, and colonial women from the periphery to the center of the narrative. References: Dr. Cornel West on the Joe Rogan Experience (relevent portion at 1h02m) Child, Lydia Maria; Carolyn L. Karcher. 2011. Hobomok and Other Writings on Indians. New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press. Karcher, Carolyn L. 2012. The First Woman in the Republic A Cultural Biography of Lydia Maria Child. Durham: Duke University Press. The American History Podcast. Plymouth 7: The Lyford Affair. Posted on April 10, 2018

91 MIN2019 SEP 28
Comments
27 - 'Hobomok: A Tale of Early Times' by Lydia Maria Child (1824)

26 - 'The Pioneers' by James Fenimore Cooper (1823) - Part 2

This is the free Literary Hangover feed. To support the show and access the premium episodes on George Orwell (Orwell|er), become a Patron at Patreon.com/LiteraryHangover Alex and Matt return to finish James Fenimore Cooper's "The Pioneers." The relationship between colonization and racism. Submerged nobility in Cooper's fiction. How American colonization really took off after 1776. Turkey shoots and how Natty calling Cooper's first non-slave black character the N-word illustrates the work of Frantz Fanon. Passenger pigeons as the east coast's bison and how cops like to useold military equipment. Natty's principled opposition to surplus. Marmaduke Temple's elite conservationism. Places not described in books. Economic espionage by the new sheriff. Kirby as the urban, proletarian Natty. Why jailbreaks were indeed common in the real life Cooperstown. Marmaduke Temple's double-dipping on behalf of the Effinghams. @Alecks_Guns, @MattLech @LitHangover Sources: Librivox's recording of The...

105 MIN2019 SEP 8
Comments
26 - 'The Pioneers' by James Fenimore Cooper (1823) - Part 2

25 - 'The Pioneers' by James Fenimore Cooper (1823) - Part 1

This is the free Literary Hangover feed. To support the show and access the premium episodes on George Orwell (Orwell|er), become a Patron at Patreon.com/LiteraryHangover Alex and I discuss the underrated first novel of James Fenimore Cooper's 'Leatherstocking Tales,' ***The Pioneers, or The Sources of the Susquehanna; a Descriptive Tale. ***We discuss James' father 'self- made' landlord father, William, who settled central New York after obtaining massive amounts of land following the flux of the American Revolution. William and James, slaveowners. Coopers lamentable race science fixation and commendable proto-Marxist materialism. Judge Temple as the first Dick Cheney. The American frontier myth. Maple trees as short-term and long-term commodities. No settlements without commodification. Environmentalism as a test of gentility. Maple sugar: the market solution to carribbean sugar slavery. @Alecks_Guns, @MattLech @LitHangover Sources: Barbara Mann and Alan Taylor, April 23, 2001. Wr...

138 MIN2019 JUL 28
Comments
25 - 'The Pioneers' by James Fenimore Cooper (1823) - Part 1
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