Himalaya-The Podcast Player

4.8K Ratings
Open In App
title

2018 Edinburgh International Book Festival

Edinburgh International Book Festival

2
Followers
3
Plays
2018 Edinburgh International Book Festival

2018 Edinburgh International Book Festival

Edinburgh International Book Festival

2
Followers
3
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Details

About Us

In 2018, the Edinburgh International Book Festival (edbookfest) offered audiences the Freedom to Think in over 800 events with some of the world’s leading writers and performers. Topics under discussion included the future of democracy, the role of radical women in shaping society, the state of our oceans and the environment, the legacy of Edinburgh literary legend Muriel Spark, and the freedoms that matter most to us in an age of political upheaval. More than 900 novelists, poets, illustrators, historians, politicians, journalists, scientists and performers arrived from 55 countries to entertain, educate, inspire and debate with our audiences, in another unforgettable year for the Book Festival. Listen to a selection of our favourite events from across the programme in this free podcast series – there’s something for every taste and interest.

Latest Episodes

Gerda Stevenson (2018 Event)

GREAT WOMEN OF SCOTLAND In histories written by men, good women have rarely been given much credit. In Scotland, there’s a growing urge to redress the balance and, with her new collection Quines, Gerda Stevenson has produced a very necessary corrective. These unforgettable poems recognise the salt sellers, the fish-gutters, scientists and politicians who have made such a key contribution to Scotland’s history. Chaired by Jackie McGlone. Part of our Scottish Ideas series of events.

57 MIN2018 NOV 14
Comments
Gerda Stevenson (2018 Event)

Guy Gunaratne & Imran Mahmood (2018 Event)

EXPLOSIVE FICTION Meet two new writers whose debuts are turning heads. Guy Gunaratne’s In Our Mad and Furious City follows three young men in a London estate where riots are spreading after the killing of a British soldier. Imran Mahmood has spent his career as a barrister and he puts his experience to electric use in You Don’t Know Me, a courtroom drama which places the reader in the position of the jury.

58 MIN2018 NOV 12
Comments
Guy Gunaratne & Imran Mahmood (2018 Event)

Jo Swinson (2018 Event)

ELIMINATING GENDER INEQUALITY As deputy leader of the Liberal Democrats and a former Government minister, Jo Swinson has seen all too clearly how power can be concentrated in the hands of men right across the business, cultural and political spectrum. Equal Power is the East Dunbartonshire MP’s call to arms; a practical and optimistic guide to what we can all do to make society truly gender equal, and she shares her ideas today. Part of our Politics for Change series of events.

55 MIN2018 NOV 9
Comments
Jo Swinson (2018 Event)

Sean Borodale & Ruth Padel (2018 Event)

BLACK BLOSSOM OF MOURNING The exceptional emotional breadth of British poetry is on display in this event featuring Sean Borodale and Ruth Padel. Borodale, described by Carol Ann Duffy as ‘the most exciting new poet I’ve read since Alice Oswald’, brings Asylum, a new collection that nods to the Underworld. Prize-winning poet Padel presents Emerald, a beautiful elegy for her mother, who died at the age of 97.

59 MIN2018 NOV 7
Comments
Sean Borodale & Ruth Padel (2018 Event)

Donal Ryan & Kamila Shamsie (2018 Event)

CROSSING CONTINENTS Donal Ryan's novels are a thrilling journey into the psyche of everyday Irish folk, but From a Low and Quiet Sea departs from his previous three books by extending its setting beyond rural Ireland into war-torn Syria. Kamila Shamsie’s highly praised Home Fire is another transnational novel, a contemporary take on the Antigone myth, looking at why people become radicalised in the modern world.

60 MIN2018 NOV 5
Comments
Donal Ryan & Kamila Shamsie (2018 Event)

Shahad Al Rawi & Michael Donkor (2018 Event)

JUST GOOD FRIENDS Two coming-of-age tales come under the microscope in this event. Shahad Al Rawi’s poignant debut The Baghdad Clock takes us back to 1991 with the Iraqi capital under fire as two girls bond against the backdrop of military bombardment. Michael Donkor’s moving and unexpectedly funny debut novel Hold, switches between Ghana and Britain as a wayward girl finds kinship with a sensible teenager.

62 MIN2018 NOV 2
Comments
Shahad Al Rawi & Michael Donkor (2018 Event)

Sue Black with Val McDermid (2018 Event)

THE BARE BONES Few people are as familiar with death as Professor Sue Black. As a forensic anthropologist she sees it in the form of human remains; at scenes of murder, at burial sites and in her lab. Black’s astonishing book, All That Remains, offers fascinating insights into mortality and the value of forensic science. Today she compares notes with crimewriter Val McDermid.

55 MIN2018 OCT 31
Comments
Sue Black with Val McDermid (2018 Event)

Tony Juniper (2018 Event)

SAVE THE FUTURE It seems as if people have been trying to save the rainforests for a very long time. And while approximately half of their area has been effectively destroyed, it’s not too late to do the right thing by the other 50%. After all, it’s only the future of the planet that’s at stake. Environmental campaigner and author of Rainforest Tony Juniper has some answers about what can still be done. Part of our Our Planet and Us series of events.

58 MIN2018 OCT 29
Comments
Tony Juniper (2018 Event)

David France (2018 Event)

LIVING AFTER SURVIVING How to Survive a Plague is David France’s history of the fight against AIDS, the disease caused by HIV that has killed over 35 million people worldwide. Described as ‘subtle and searing', it won the Baillie Gifford Prize last year. Now the Book Festival and the Prize have commissioned France to write a new chapter, responding to what he’s learned since his book was published. Today, he presents that follow-up. Chaired by Steven Gale. Part of our Mind and Body series of events.

57 MIN2018 OCT 26
Comments
David France (2018 Event)

Dag Solstad (2018 Event)

NORWAY'S TOP PRIZE-WINNING NOVELIST One of Norway’s most celebrated contemporary writers joins us with his latest novel, T Singer. Set in the small Norwegian town of Notodden, Dag Solstad's story is a heartbreaking account of love and loneliness, which lays bare the existential questions of life in the author’s bleakly comic style. Solstad is the only author to have won the Norwegian Critics Prize three times – come and discover why. Supported by the Hawthornden Literary Retreat

60 MIN2018 OCT 24
Comments
Dag Solstad (2018 Event)

Latest Episodes

Gerda Stevenson (2018 Event)

GREAT WOMEN OF SCOTLAND In histories written by men, good women have rarely been given much credit. In Scotland, there’s a growing urge to redress the balance and, with her new collection Quines, Gerda Stevenson has produced a very necessary corrective. These unforgettable poems recognise the salt sellers, the fish-gutters, scientists and politicians who have made such a key contribution to Scotland’s history. Chaired by Jackie McGlone. Part of our Scottish Ideas series of events.

57 MIN2018 NOV 14
Comments
Gerda Stevenson (2018 Event)

Guy Gunaratne & Imran Mahmood (2018 Event)

EXPLOSIVE FICTION Meet two new writers whose debuts are turning heads. Guy Gunaratne’s In Our Mad and Furious City follows three young men in a London estate where riots are spreading after the killing of a British soldier. Imran Mahmood has spent his career as a barrister and he puts his experience to electric use in You Don’t Know Me, a courtroom drama which places the reader in the position of the jury.

58 MIN2018 NOV 12
Comments
Guy Gunaratne & Imran Mahmood (2018 Event)

Jo Swinson (2018 Event)

ELIMINATING GENDER INEQUALITY As deputy leader of the Liberal Democrats and a former Government minister, Jo Swinson has seen all too clearly how power can be concentrated in the hands of men right across the business, cultural and political spectrum. Equal Power is the East Dunbartonshire MP’s call to arms; a practical and optimistic guide to what we can all do to make society truly gender equal, and she shares her ideas today. Part of our Politics for Change series of events.

55 MIN2018 NOV 9
Comments
Jo Swinson (2018 Event)

Sean Borodale & Ruth Padel (2018 Event)

BLACK BLOSSOM OF MOURNING The exceptional emotional breadth of British poetry is on display in this event featuring Sean Borodale and Ruth Padel. Borodale, described by Carol Ann Duffy as ‘the most exciting new poet I’ve read since Alice Oswald’, brings Asylum, a new collection that nods to the Underworld. Prize-winning poet Padel presents Emerald, a beautiful elegy for her mother, who died at the age of 97.

59 MIN2018 NOV 7
Comments
Sean Borodale & Ruth Padel (2018 Event)

Donal Ryan & Kamila Shamsie (2018 Event)

CROSSING CONTINENTS Donal Ryan's novels are a thrilling journey into the psyche of everyday Irish folk, but From a Low and Quiet Sea departs from his previous three books by extending its setting beyond rural Ireland into war-torn Syria. Kamila Shamsie’s highly praised Home Fire is another transnational novel, a contemporary take on the Antigone myth, looking at why people become radicalised in the modern world.

60 MIN2018 NOV 5
Comments
Donal Ryan & Kamila Shamsie (2018 Event)

Shahad Al Rawi & Michael Donkor (2018 Event)

JUST GOOD FRIENDS Two coming-of-age tales come under the microscope in this event. Shahad Al Rawi’s poignant debut The Baghdad Clock takes us back to 1991 with the Iraqi capital under fire as two girls bond against the backdrop of military bombardment. Michael Donkor’s moving and unexpectedly funny debut novel Hold, switches between Ghana and Britain as a wayward girl finds kinship with a sensible teenager.

62 MIN2018 NOV 2
Comments
Shahad Al Rawi & Michael Donkor (2018 Event)

Sue Black with Val McDermid (2018 Event)

THE BARE BONES Few people are as familiar with death as Professor Sue Black. As a forensic anthropologist she sees it in the form of human remains; at scenes of murder, at burial sites and in her lab. Black’s astonishing book, All That Remains, offers fascinating insights into mortality and the value of forensic science. Today she compares notes with crimewriter Val McDermid.

55 MIN2018 OCT 31
Comments
Sue Black with Val McDermid (2018 Event)

Tony Juniper (2018 Event)

SAVE THE FUTURE It seems as if people have been trying to save the rainforests for a very long time. And while approximately half of their area has been effectively destroyed, it’s not too late to do the right thing by the other 50%. After all, it’s only the future of the planet that’s at stake. Environmental campaigner and author of Rainforest Tony Juniper has some answers about what can still be done. Part of our Our Planet and Us series of events.

58 MIN2018 OCT 29
Comments
Tony Juniper (2018 Event)

David France (2018 Event)

LIVING AFTER SURVIVING How to Survive a Plague is David France’s history of the fight against AIDS, the disease caused by HIV that has killed over 35 million people worldwide. Described as ‘subtle and searing', it won the Baillie Gifford Prize last year. Now the Book Festival and the Prize have commissioned France to write a new chapter, responding to what he’s learned since his book was published. Today, he presents that follow-up. Chaired by Steven Gale. Part of our Mind and Body series of events.

57 MIN2018 OCT 26
Comments
David France (2018 Event)

Dag Solstad (2018 Event)

NORWAY'S TOP PRIZE-WINNING NOVELIST One of Norway’s most celebrated contemporary writers joins us with his latest novel, T Singer. Set in the small Norwegian town of Notodden, Dag Solstad's story is a heartbreaking account of love and loneliness, which lays bare the existential questions of life in the author’s bleakly comic style. Solstad is the only author to have won the Norwegian Critics Prize three times – come and discover why. Supported by the Hawthornden Literary Retreat

60 MIN2018 OCT 24
Comments
Dag Solstad (2018 Event)
hmly
Welcome to Himalaya LearningDozens of podcourses featuring over 100 experts are waiting for you.