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PA BOOKS on PCN

PCN - Pennsylvania Cable Network

5
Followers
55
Plays
PA BOOKS on PCN

PA BOOKS on PCN

PCN - Pennsylvania Cable Network

5
Followers
55
Plays
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About Us

PA Books features authors of books about Pennsylvania-related topics. These hour-long conversations allow authors to discuss both their subject matter and inspiration behind the books.

Latest Episodes

“Tanking to the Top” with Yaron Weitzman

When a group of private equity bigwigs purchased the Philadelphia 76ers in 2011, the team was both bad and boring. Attendance was down. So were ratings. The Sixers had an aging coach, an antiquated front office, and a group of players that could best be described as mediocre. Enter Sam Hinkie — a man with a plan straight out of the PE playbook, one that violated professional sports’ Golden Rule: You play to win the game. In Hinkie’s view, the best way to reach first was to embrace becoming the worst — to sacrifice wins in the present in order to capture championships in the future. And to those dubious, Hinkie had a response: Trust The Process, and the results will follow. The plan, dubbed “The Process,” seems to have worked. More than six years after handing Hinkie the keys, the Sixers have transformed into one of the most exciting teams in the NBA. They’ve emerged as a championship contender with a roster full of stars, none bigger than Joel Embiid, a captivating seven-footer known for both brutalizing opponents on the court and taunting them off of it. Beneath the surface, though, lies a different story, one of infighting, dueling egos, and competing agendas. Hinkie, pushed out less than three years into his reign by a demoralized owner, a jealous CEO, and an embarrassed NBA, was the first casualty of The Process. He’d be far from the last. Yaron Weitzman is an award-winning NBA writer for Bleacher Report and a former senior writer for the magazine SLAM. He has an MFA in Writing from Manhattanville College and his work has also been published in ESPN, the New Yorker, New York Magazine, the Ringer, the Athletic, SB Nation, Tablet Magazine, and more. Description courtesy of Grand Central Publishing.

48 min1 w ago
Comments
“Tanking to the Top” with Yaron Weitzman

“The Founding Fortunes” with Tom Shachtman

In "The Founding Fortunes," historian Tom Shachtman reveals the ways in which a dozen notable Revolutionaries deeply affected the finances and birth of the new country while making and losing their fortunes. While history teaches that successful revolutions depend on participation by the common man, the establishment of a stable and independent United States first required wealthy colonials uniting to disrupt the very system that had enriched them, and then funding a very long war. While some fortunes were made during the war at the expense of the poor, many of the wealthy embraced the goal of obtaining for their poorer countrymen an unprecedented equality of opportunity, along with independence. In addition to nuanced views of the well-known wealthy such as Robert Morris and John Hancock, and of the less wealthy but influential Alexander Hamilton, "The Founding Fortunes" offers insight into the contributions of those often overlooked by popular history: Henry Laurens, the plantatio...

51 min2 w ago
Comments
“The Founding Fortunes” with Tom Shachtman

"Becoming Philadelphia" with Inga Saffron

Over the past two decades, Inga Saffron has served as the premier chronicler of the city’s physical transformation as it emerged from a half century of decline. Through her Pulitzer Prize-winning columns on architecture and urbanism in the Philadelphia Inquirer, she has tracked the city’s revival on a weekly basis. "Becoming Philadelphia" collects the best of Saffron’s work, plus a new introduction reflecting on the stunning changes the city has undergone. A fearless crusader who is also a seasoned reporter, Saffron ranges beyond the usual boundaries of architectural criticism to explore how big money and politics intersect with design, profoundly shaping our everyday experience of city life. Even as she celebrates Philadelphia’s resurgence, she considers how it finds itself grappling with the problems of success: gentrification, poverty, privatization, and the unequal distribution of public services. Inga Saffron has served as the architecture critic for the Philadelphia Inquir...

58 min3 w ago
Comments
"Becoming Philadelphia" with Inga Saffron

“Playing Politics with Natural Disaster” with Timothy Kneeland

Hurricane Agnes struck the United States in June of 1972, just months before a pivotal election and at the dawn of the deindustrialization period across the Northeast. The response by local, state, and national officials had long-term consequences for all Americans. President Richard Nixon used the tragedy for political gain by delivering a generous relief package to the key states of New York and Pennsylvania in a bid to win over voters. After his landslide reelection in 1972, Nixon cut benefits for disaster victims and then passed legislation to push responsibility for disaster preparation and mitigation on to states and localities. The impact led to the rise of emergency management and inspired the development of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). With a particular focus on events in New York and Pennsylvania, Timothy W. Kneeland narrates how local, state, and federal authorities responded to the immediate crisis of Hurricane Agnes and managed the long-term recovery....

58 minSEP 21
Comments
“Playing Politics with Natural Disaster” with Timothy Kneeland

"Saga of the Johnstown City Schools" with Clea Hollis

Offers a detailed chronology of the growth, decline, and attempted resurrection of one American public education system. This book illustrates academic milestones and contributions of Johnstown's African-American community with the development of Johnstown Schools.

58 minAUG 24
Comments
"Saga of the Johnstown City Schools" with Clea Hollis

"Ruling Suburbia: John J. McClure and the Republican Machine in Delaware County, Pennsylvania" with John Morrison McLarnon

Ruling Suburbia chronicles the history of the Republican machine that has dominated the political life of Delaware County, Pennsylvania, since 1875, and of the career of John J. McClure, who controlled the machine from 1907 until 1965.

58 minAUG 17
Comments
"Ruling Suburbia: John J. McClure and the Republican Machine in Delaware County, Pennsylvania" with John Morrison McLarnon

“Bridges…Pittsburgh at the Point…A Journey Through History” with Thomas Leech and Linda Kaplan

“Bridges…Pittsburgh at the Point…A Journey Through History” tells the stories of the 34 bridges that crossed the Monongahela, Allegheny, and Ohio rivers in Pittsburgh from 1818 to today. Told through the words of engineers, architects, planners, and historians this is a story of the development of technology, the rise of a city, and the progress of transportation. Thomas Leech is the retired Chief Bridge Engineer of Gannett Fleming, Inc., Adjunct Professor of Civil Engineering of Carnegie Mellon University and a part of the continuing education faculty of the Pennsylvania State University. Linda Kaplan is a bridge engineer in the Pittsburgh region. She has experience designing highway, rail, and pedestrian bridges, retaining walls, and tunnels Description courtesy of Thomas Leech and Linda Kaplan.

57 minJUL 27
Comments
“Bridges…Pittsburgh at the Point…A Journey Through History” with Thomas Leech and Linda Kaplan

"The Houses of Louis Kahn" with George Marcus and William Whitaker

Louis Kahn (1901–1974), one of the most important architects of the postwar period, is widely admired for his great monumental works, including the Kimbell Art Museum, the Salk Institute, and the National Assembly Complex in Bangladesh. However, the importance of his houses has been largely overlooked. This beautiful book is the first to look at Kahn’s nine major private houses. Beginning with his earliest encounters with Modernism in the late 1920s and continuing through his iconic work of the 1960s and 1970s, the authors trace the evolution of the architect’s thinking, which began and matured through his design of houses and their interiors, a process inspired by his interactions with clients and his admiration for vernacular building traditions. Richly illustrated with new and period photographs and original drawings, as well as previously unpublished materials from personal interviews, archives, and Kahn’s own writings, The Houses of Louis Kahn shows how his ideas about dome...

57 minJUL 20
Comments
"The Houses of Louis Kahn" with George Marcus and William Whitaker

"Juniata, River of Sorrows" with Dennis McIlnay

A stirring documentary of Dennis McIlnay's trip on the 100- mile Juniata River in central Pennsylvania, and a moving portrait of some of the Juniata's earliest -- and bloodiest -- events.

58 minJUL 14
Comments
"Juniata, River of Sorrows" with Dennis McIlnay

"James Buchanan and the Political Crisis of the 1850s" with Michael Birkner

When Buchanan entered the White House in March 1857, he seemed well positioned to accomplish his main objectives. A canny and seasoned politician from Pennsylvania with a reputation for moderation on slavery-related issues, Buchanan had a straightforward agenda: the amelioration of sectional tensions, the promotion of American prosperity, and the extension of the Democrats' control of the federal government. Four years later, Buchanan left Washington convinced that he had done his best and accomplished much. In fact, he left behind a shattered Democratic party, a new Republican president, Abraham Lincoln, and a ruptured Union. Except for a cadre of faithful Pennsylvania friends, Buchanan's reputation lay in ruins. He has consistently been ranked among the least effective presidents in American history.

60 minJUL 7
Comments
"James Buchanan and the Political Crisis of the 1850s" with Michael Birkner

Latest Episodes

“Tanking to the Top” with Yaron Weitzman

When a group of private equity bigwigs purchased the Philadelphia 76ers in 2011, the team was both bad and boring. Attendance was down. So were ratings. The Sixers had an aging coach, an antiquated front office, and a group of players that could best be described as mediocre. Enter Sam Hinkie — a man with a plan straight out of the PE playbook, one that violated professional sports’ Golden Rule: You play to win the game. In Hinkie’s view, the best way to reach first was to embrace becoming the worst — to sacrifice wins in the present in order to capture championships in the future. And to those dubious, Hinkie had a response: Trust The Process, and the results will follow. The plan, dubbed “The Process,” seems to have worked. More than six years after handing Hinkie the keys, the Sixers have transformed into one of the most exciting teams in the NBA. They’ve emerged as a championship contender with a roster full of stars, none bigger than Joel Embiid, a captivating seven-footer known for both brutalizing opponents on the court and taunting them off of it. Beneath the surface, though, lies a different story, one of infighting, dueling egos, and competing agendas. Hinkie, pushed out less than three years into his reign by a demoralized owner, a jealous CEO, and an embarrassed NBA, was the first casualty of The Process. He’d be far from the last. Yaron Weitzman is an award-winning NBA writer for Bleacher Report and a former senior writer for the magazine SLAM. He has an MFA in Writing from Manhattanville College and his work has also been published in ESPN, the New Yorker, New York Magazine, the Ringer, the Athletic, SB Nation, Tablet Magazine, and more. Description courtesy of Grand Central Publishing.

48 min1 w ago
Comments
“Tanking to the Top” with Yaron Weitzman

“The Founding Fortunes” with Tom Shachtman

In "The Founding Fortunes," historian Tom Shachtman reveals the ways in which a dozen notable Revolutionaries deeply affected the finances and birth of the new country while making and losing their fortunes. While history teaches that successful revolutions depend on participation by the common man, the establishment of a stable and independent United States first required wealthy colonials uniting to disrupt the very system that had enriched them, and then funding a very long war. While some fortunes were made during the war at the expense of the poor, many of the wealthy embraced the goal of obtaining for their poorer countrymen an unprecedented equality of opportunity, along with independence. In addition to nuanced views of the well-known wealthy such as Robert Morris and John Hancock, and of the less wealthy but influential Alexander Hamilton, "The Founding Fortunes" offers insight into the contributions of those often overlooked by popular history: Henry Laurens, the plantatio...

51 min2 w ago
Comments
“The Founding Fortunes” with Tom Shachtman

"Becoming Philadelphia" with Inga Saffron

Over the past two decades, Inga Saffron has served as the premier chronicler of the city’s physical transformation as it emerged from a half century of decline. Through her Pulitzer Prize-winning columns on architecture and urbanism in the Philadelphia Inquirer, she has tracked the city’s revival on a weekly basis. "Becoming Philadelphia" collects the best of Saffron’s work, plus a new introduction reflecting on the stunning changes the city has undergone. A fearless crusader who is also a seasoned reporter, Saffron ranges beyond the usual boundaries of architectural criticism to explore how big money and politics intersect with design, profoundly shaping our everyday experience of city life. Even as she celebrates Philadelphia’s resurgence, she considers how it finds itself grappling with the problems of success: gentrification, poverty, privatization, and the unequal distribution of public services. Inga Saffron has served as the architecture critic for the Philadelphia Inquir...

58 min3 w ago
Comments
"Becoming Philadelphia" with Inga Saffron

“Playing Politics with Natural Disaster” with Timothy Kneeland

Hurricane Agnes struck the United States in June of 1972, just months before a pivotal election and at the dawn of the deindustrialization period across the Northeast. The response by local, state, and national officials had long-term consequences for all Americans. President Richard Nixon used the tragedy for political gain by delivering a generous relief package to the key states of New York and Pennsylvania in a bid to win over voters. After his landslide reelection in 1972, Nixon cut benefits for disaster victims and then passed legislation to push responsibility for disaster preparation and mitigation on to states and localities. The impact led to the rise of emergency management and inspired the development of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). With a particular focus on events in New York and Pennsylvania, Timothy W. Kneeland narrates how local, state, and federal authorities responded to the immediate crisis of Hurricane Agnes and managed the long-term recovery....

58 minSEP 21
Comments
“Playing Politics with Natural Disaster” with Timothy Kneeland

"Saga of the Johnstown City Schools" with Clea Hollis

Offers a detailed chronology of the growth, decline, and attempted resurrection of one American public education system. This book illustrates academic milestones and contributions of Johnstown's African-American community with the development of Johnstown Schools.

58 minAUG 24
Comments
"Saga of the Johnstown City Schools" with Clea Hollis

"Ruling Suburbia: John J. McClure and the Republican Machine in Delaware County, Pennsylvania" with John Morrison McLarnon

Ruling Suburbia chronicles the history of the Republican machine that has dominated the political life of Delaware County, Pennsylvania, since 1875, and of the career of John J. McClure, who controlled the machine from 1907 until 1965.

58 minAUG 17
Comments
"Ruling Suburbia: John J. McClure and the Republican Machine in Delaware County, Pennsylvania" with John Morrison McLarnon

“Bridges…Pittsburgh at the Point…A Journey Through History” with Thomas Leech and Linda Kaplan

“Bridges…Pittsburgh at the Point…A Journey Through History” tells the stories of the 34 bridges that crossed the Monongahela, Allegheny, and Ohio rivers in Pittsburgh from 1818 to today. Told through the words of engineers, architects, planners, and historians this is a story of the development of technology, the rise of a city, and the progress of transportation. Thomas Leech is the retired Chief Bridge Engineer of Gannett Fleming, Inc., Adjunct Professor of Civil Engineering of Carnegie Mellon University and a part of the continuing education faculty of the Pennsylvania State University. Linda Kaplan is a bridge engineer in the Pittsburgh region. She has experience designing highway, rail, and pedestrian bridges, retaining walls, and tunnels Description courtesy of Thomas Leech and Linda Kaplan.

57 minJUL 27
Comments
“Bridges…Pittsburgh at the Point…A Journey Through History” with Thomas Leech and Linda Kaplan

"The Houses of Louis Kahn" with George Marcus and William Whitaker

Louis Kahn (1901–1974), one of the most important architects of the postwar period, is widely admired for his great monumental works, including the Kimbell Art Museum, the Salk Institute, and the National Assembly Complex in Bangladesh. However, the importance of his houses has been largely overlooked. This beautiful book is the first to look at Kahn’s nine major private houses. Beginning with his earliest encounters with Modernism in the late 1920s and continuing through his iconic work of the 1960s and 1970s, the authors trace the evolution of the architect’s thinking, which began and matured through his design of houses and their interiors, a process inspired by his interactions with clients and his admiration for vernacular building traditions. Richly illustrated with new and period photographs and original drawings, as well as previously unpublished materials from personal interviews, archives, and Kahn’s own writings, The Houses of Louis Kahn shows how his ideas about dome...

57 minJUL 20
Comments
"The Houses of Louis Kahn" with George Marcus and William Whitaker

"Juniata, River of Sorrows" with Dennis McIlnay

A stirring documentary of Dennis McIlnay's trip on the 100- mile Juniata River in central Pennsylvania, and a moving portrait of some of the Juniata's earliest -- and bloodiest -- events.

58 minJUL 14
Comments
"Juniata, River of Sorrows" with Dennis McIlnay

"James Buchanan and the Political Crisis of the 1850s" with Michael Birkner

When Buchanan entered the White House in March 1857, he seemed well positioned to accomplish his main objectives. A canny and seasoned politician from Pennsylvania with a reputation for moderation on slavery-related issues, Buchanan had a straightforward agenda: the amelioration of sectional tensions, the promotion of American prosperity, and the extension of the Democrats' control of the federal government. Four years later, Buchanan left Washington convinced that he had done his best and accomplished much. In fact, he left behind a shattered Democratic party, a new Republican president, Abraham Lincoln, and a ruptured Union. Except for a cadre of faithful Pennsylvania friends, Buchanan's reputation lay in ruins. He has consistently been ranked among the least effective presidents in American history.

60 minJUL 7
Comments
"James Buchanan and the Political Crisis of the 1850s" with Michael Birkner
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