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Latest Episodes

From the Creators of Thanos: The Making of a Virtual Human – Intel on AI Season 2, Episode 9

In this Intel on AI podcast episode: guest Doug Roble, the senior director of software research and development at Digital Domain, joins hosts Abigail Hing Wen and Amir Khosrowshahi to talk about how Digital Domain creates virtual effects for blockbuster movies. Doug, Abigail, and Amir discuss how Digital Domain developed virtual characters for Brad Pitt in The Curious Case of Benjamin Button and Josh Brolin in Avengers: Endgame, the technology and AI models that go into creating such complex visuals, and the virtual humans the company is working on today. To see the latest digital humans the company is developing, watch this YouTube video at: youtu.be/RKiGfGQxqaQs. Follow Digital Domain on Twitter at: twitter.com/digitaldomaindd Follow Abigail on Twitter at: twitter.com/abigailhingwen Learn more about the future of AI at: intel.com/ai

--1 w ago
Comments
From the Creators of Thanos: The Making of a Virtual Human – Intel on AI Season 2, Episode 9

Tech Tonics: Dr. Sally Shaywitz: Advancing Science, Driving Policy, Overcoming Dyslexia

Dr. Sally Shaywitz – Yes, she is David’s mom – has brought an entrepreneur’s mindset to her life’s work in dyslexia, recognizing the condition as a prevalent and underappreciated need, then working tirelessly to advance the science and enact the policy required to fully unlock the potential within so many brilliant individuals. Sally has helped a huge array of individuals access what she has famously termed their “sea of strengths”. The daughter of two immigrants who had escaped Eastern Europe at the turn of the century and arrived in America in search of a better life, Sally was born and grew up up in the Bronx, New York. The family wasn’t well-off: her father was a dressmaker, her mom, a homemaker. Yet she describes her childhood, with her parents and older sister, Irene, as “overflowing with love.” Sally attended college at the City College of New York (CCNY), and after initially contemplating a career in law, found herself drawn to medicine, and was accepted early into the medical school of her choice, Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Tragically, the same year, Sally’s mom was afflicted with endometrial cancer, and despite what initially seemed like an encouraging prognosis, she grew progressively ill and ultimately passed away, a particularly devastating experience given the family’s especially close emotional bonds. While entering medical school with a heavy heart, Sally soon found she resonated with what she describes as the humanity and warmth of medicine; she was especially drawn to pediatrics, pursuing it herself and marrying a pediatrician, Bennett Shaywitz, she met the summer after her first year of medical school. While Sally was one of only four women in a class of 100, she generally found the men to be far friendlier; similarly, during her pediatrics training. When she wanted to organize her schedule so she could take time off to be with her first child, it was her female colleagues, she said, who resisted and rejected the idea. After completing her training in pediatrics and a fellowship in developmental pediatrics, Sally and her family – now with three children – moved to Dayton, OH, where her husband had been assigned by the Air Force to run a research center during the Vietnam War. Sally decided she wanted to focus on her children, and put her career on hold. She loved the experience, and wrote about it for the New York Times Sunday Magazine, focusing on the contrast between, as she describes it, what “enlightened women” were taught about motherhood and how, in her experience, it was so much more instinctive, positive and fulfilling. The family subsequently relocated to suburban Connecticut after Bennett accepted a position at Yale Medical School. Sally says she initially planned to be a stay-at-home mom, but found the available social environment intellectually deadening. She began to see patients out of her home – an experience she wrote up for Ms. Magazine – and was soon recruited by Yale to care for the learning disorder patients that apparently no one else was interested in seeing. The field was viewed at the time as a bit of a backwater (the starting point of so many entrepreneurial journeys!), but Sally found she really enjoyed taking care of patients with dyslexia, and was determined to drive their care forward. This mission would come to define Sally’s career (and soon, Bennett’s as well, as they began to work as a team), starting with a transformative longitudinal study (now in its 37th year, and counting!) that evolved into an extensive clinical research program. Their research revealed that dyslexia was surprisingly common – affecting about 20% of the population – and that it doesn’t spontaneously regress with age. Sally developed what’s now commonly called the “sea of strengths” model, which describes dyslexia as a localized deficit in the way language is processed, so reading takes longer. It is a problem often seen in children with tremendous strengths; thus, it becomes parti

--1 w ago
Comments
Tech Tonics: Dr. Sally Shaywitz: Advancing Science, Driving Policy, Overcoming Dyslexia

Business Group on Health: The Case for Honoring Caregivers

Even before COVID-19, the U.S. was facing a caregiving crisis. And now, well over half of Americans are worrying about, taking care of, or looking out for a friend, neighbor or family member due to pandemic. But as these unpaid caregivers pour their love and energy into this role, many are suffering as a result. In this episode of the Business Group on Health podcast, we speak with Alex Drane about the majesty of caregiving, as well as the human and business imperative of supporting our supporters.

--2 w ago
Comments
Business Group on Health: The Case for Honoring Caregivers

Using AI Sense to Stay Safe During a Pandemic – Conversations in the Cloud – Episode 214

In this Intel Conversations in the Cloud audio podcast: Alok Mishra, founder of Wesense, joins host Jake Smith to talk about how the company, in partnership with Wipro, developed Clearhealth—a safety compliance product for COVID-19 in India that combines touch-free attendance, temperature checks, sanitization compliance, and mask protection compliance for offices and retail locations. The two talk about the importance of technology helping solve emerging problems and how Wesense improved inference time using Intel optimized TensorFlow, Intel Distribution of OpenVINO, and Intel Distribution for Python. Follow Wesense on Twitter: twitter.com/wesenseai Follow Jake on Twitter: twitter.com/jakesmithintel

--2 w ago
Comments
Using AI Sense to Stay Safe During a Pandemic – Conversations in the Cloud – Episode 214

How Intel Prepares Partners for New Technology – Conversations in the Cloud – Episode 213

In this Intel Conversations in the Cloud audio podcast: Michael Hall, director of technology and ecosystem enablement at Intel, joins host Jake Smith to talk how Intel works with partners to ensure the market is properly prepared for technology coming out three to five years into the future. The two talk about how the PCIe standard is evolving for lower-latency and all the compatibly and testing work that goes into next generation chips. Michael also talks about what changes he’s excited about in the industry. Follow Jake on Twitter: twitter.com/jakesmithintel

--2 w ago
Comments
How Intel Prepares Partners for New Technology – Conversations in the Cloud – Episode 213

At the OpenMP Forefront

Who better to have a spicy discussion with about #OpenMP than Tim Mattson and Bronis de Supinski? These two have truly lived at the forefront of the amazing, decades-long OpenMP journey, from its inception to its preeminence as a foundational tool for HPC application programmers. Listen to what’s coming in 5.1 and beyond, how the C++ ecosystem is evolving, why Python in HPC, and have fun as these two razz each other. Guests: Bronis de Supinski, Chief Technology Officer, Livermore Computing, Lawrence Livermore National Lab; Chair, OpenMP Language Committee Tim Mattson, Senior Principal Engineer, and Manager, Programming Systems Research Group, Intel To learn more: OpenMP.org Intel oneAPI HPC Toolkit oneAPI

--3 w ago
Comments
At the OpenMP Forefront

A Modern History of AI with Turing Award Winner Yann LeCun – Intel on AI Season 2, Episode 8

In this episode of Intel on AI guest Yann LeCun, chief AI scientist at Facebook and professor at NYU, joins host Abigail Hing Wen to talk about the history and adoption of AI. Considered one of the “godfathers of AI” and an ACM Turing Award Laureate, Yann has seen the ups and downs of AI for decades. Yann and Abigail talk about the origins of AI, how the ideas and advancements in technology proliferated, and what the future of AI holds. Follow Yann on Twitter at: twitter.com/ylecun Follow Abigail on Twitter at: twitter.com/abigailhingwen Learn more about the future of AI at: intel.com/ai

--3 w ago
Comments
A Modern History of AI with Turing Award Winner Yann LeCun – Intel on AI Season 2, Episode 8

Celebrating Women Innovators: Two Trailblazers Who Are Advancing Technology

Denisa Constantinescu, a PhD student in Mechatronics, and a researcher in the Computer Architecture Department at the University of Malaga, and Maura Tokay, a lead software programmer at Science Systems and Applications, Inc., and a computer scientist within the Department of Agriculture, share how their work is helping advance the fields of robotics, economics, manufacturing, agriculture and more, supported by oneAPI and the Intel DevCloud. They inspire us with glimpses of their journeys into tech, and what they’re looking forward to. Guests: Denisa Constantinescu, a PhD student in mechatronics and a researcher in the Computer Architecture Department at the University of Malaga Maura Tokay, computer scientist and lead software programmer at Science Systems and Applications, Inc., and recent Master’s graduate at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) To learn more: denisa-c.com devmesh.intel.com/projects/predicting-corn-wheat-and-soybean-yield oneapi.com/events/devcon2...

--3 w ago
Comments
Celebrating Women Innovators: Two Trailblazers Who Are Advancing Technology

Realizing The Agile Manifesto

Rapid iteration that has become essential to technology innovation is something well defined in the Manifesto for Agile Software Development. We are uncovering better ways of developing software by doing it and helping others do it. Through this work we have come to value: individuals and interactions over processes and tools; working software over comprehensive documentation; customer collaboration over contract negotiation; responding to change over following a plan. That is, while there is value in the items on the right, we value the items on the left more. Follow the enterprise cloud tech revolution at The Forecast by Nutanix.

--3 w ago
Comments
Realizing The Agile Manifesto

Matthew Zachary – Making Noise and Making a Difference that is Music to Patient’s Ears

Matthew Zachary, CEO ofOffscrip Media has had multiple careers despite the fact that he shouldn’t have had any. He had studied to be a concert pianist and composer and conductor through college, but at the age of 21, on his way to study in a USC graduate music program with Hans Zimmer, he was diagnosed with a rare brain cancer and told he had 6 months to live. That was in 1995. Matthew credits his uncle, a geneticist, with saving his life, serving as his medical “Sherpa” and helping him “having the chutzpah to challenge established treatment.” But his healthcare experience, and especially the 6 years it took to recover his immune system post-treatment, made clear to him that young patients weren’t getting the information they needed nor the support required to thrive after a medical crisis. Matthew had a thriving media career when a chance meeting of another recovered patient who had the same brain cancer led him to realize that there was a vast gap between patients’ need for...

--3 w ago
Comments
Matthew Zachary – Making Noise and Making a Difference that is Music to Patient’s Ears

Latest Episodes

From the Creators of Thanos: The Making of a Virtual Human – Intel on AI Season 2, Episode 9

In this Intel on AI podcast episode: guest Doug Roble, the senior director of software research and development at Digital Domain, joins hosts Abigail Hing Wen and Amir Khosrowshahi to talk about how Digital Domain creates virtual effects for blockbuster movies. Doug, Abigail, and Amir discuss how Digital Domain developed virtual characters for Brad Pitt in The Curious Case of Benjamin Button and Josh Brolin in Avengers: Endgame, the technology and AI models that go into creating such complex visuals, and the virtual humans the company is working on today. To see the latest digital humans the company is developing, watch this YouTube video at: youtu.be/RKiGfGQxqaQs. Follow Digital Domain on Twitter at: twitter.com/digitaldomaindd Follow Abigail on Twitter at: twitter.com/abigailhingwen Learn more about the future of AI at: intel.com/ai

--1 w ago
Comments
From the Creators of Thanos: The Making of a Virtual Human – Intel on AI Season 2, Episode 9

Tech Tonics: Dr. Sally Shaywitz: Advancing Science, Driving Policy, Overcoming Dyslexia

Dr. Sally Shaywitz – Yes, she is David’s mom – has brought an entrepreneur’s mindset to her life’s work in dyslexia, recognizing the condition as a prevalent and underappreciated need, then working tirelessly to advance the science and enact the policy required to fully unlock the potential within so many brilliant individuals. Sally has helped a huge array of individuals access what she has famously termed their “sea of strengths”. The daughter of two immigrants who had escaped Eastern Europe at the turn of the century and arrived in America in search of a better life, Sally was born and grew up up in the Bronx, New York. The family wasn’t well-off: her father was a dressmaker, her mom, a homemaker. Yet she describes her childhood, with her parents and older sister, Irene, as “overflowing with love.” Sally attended college at the City College of New York (CCNY), and after initially contemplating a career in law, found herself drawn to medicine, and was accepted early into the medical school of her choice, Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Tragically, the same year, Sally’s mom was afflicted with endometrial cancer, and despite what initially seemed like an encouraging prognosis, she grew progressively ill and ultimately passed away, a particularly devastating experience given the family’s especially close emotional bonds. While entering medical school with a heavy heart, Sally soon found she resonated with what she describes as the humanity and warmth of medicine; she was especially drawn to pediatrics, pursuing it herself and marrying a pediatrician, Bennett Shaywitz, she met the summer after her first year of medical school. While Sally was one of only four women in a class of 100, she generally found the men to be far friendlier; similarly, during her pediatrics training. When she wanted to organize her schedule so she could take time off to be with her first child, it was her female colleagues, she said, who resisted and rejected the idea. After completing her training in pediatrics and a fellowship in developmental pediatrics, Sally and her family – now with three children – moved to Dayton, OH, where her husband had been assigned by the Air Force to run a research center during the Vietnam War. Sally decided she wanted to focus on her children, and put her career on hold. She loved the experience, and wrote about it for the New York Times Sunday Magazine, focusing on the contrast between, as she describes it, what “enlightened women” were taught about motherhood and how, in her experience, it was so much more instinctive, positive and fulfilling. The family subsequently relocated to suburban Connecticut after Bennett accepted a position at Yale Medical School. Sally says she initially planned to be a stay-at-home mom, but found the available social environment intellectually deadening. She began to see patients out of her home – an experience she wrote up for Ms. Magazine – and was soon recruited by Yale to care for the learning disorder patients that apparently no one else was interested in seeing. The field was viewed at the time as a bit of a backwater (the starting point of so many entrepreneurial journeys!), but Sally found she really enjoyed taking care of patients with dyslexia, and was determined to drive their care forward. This mission would come to define Sally’s career (and soon, Bennett’s as well, as they began to work as a team), starting with a transformative longitudinal study (now in its 37th year, and counting!) that evolved into an extensive clinical research program. Their research revealed that dyslexia was surprisingly common – affecting about 20% of the population – and that it doesn’t spontaneously regress with age. Sally developed what’s now commonly called the “sea of strengths” model, which describes dyslexia as a localized deficit in the way language is processed, so reading takes longer. It is a problem often seen in children with tremendous strengths; thus, it becomes parti

--1 w ago
Comments
Tech Tonics: Dr. Sally Shaywitz: Advancing Science, Driving Policy, Overcoming Dyslexia

Business Group on Health: The Case for Honoring Caregivers

Even before COVID-19, the U.S. was facing a caregiving crisis. And now, well over half of Americans are worrying about, taking care of, or looking out for a friend, neighbor or family member due to pandemic. But as these unpaid caregivers pour their love and energy into this role, many are suffering as a result. In this episode of the Business Group on Health podcast, we speak with Alex Drane about the majesty of caregiving, as well as the human and business imperative of supporting our supporters.

--2 w ago
Comments
Business Group on Health: The Case for Honoring Caregivers

Using AI Sense to Stay Safe During a Pandemic – Conversations in the Cloud – Episode 214

In this Intel Conversations in the Cloud audio podcast: Alok Mishra, founder of Wesense, joins host Jake Smith to talk about how the company, in partnership with Wipro, developed Clearhealth—a safety compliance product for COVID-19 in India that combines touch-free attendance, temperature checks, sanitization compliance, and mask protection compliance for offices and retail locations. The two talk about the importance of technology helping solve emerging problems and how Wesense improved inference time using Intel optimized TensorFlow, Intel Distribution of OpenVINO, and Intel Distribution for Python. Follow Wesense on Twitter: twitter.com/wesenseai Follow Jake on Twitter: twitter.com/jakesmithintel

--2 w ago
Comments
Using AI Sense to Stay Safe During a Pandemic – Conversations in the Cloud – Episode 214

How Intel Prepares Partners for New Technology – Conversations in the Cloud – Episode 213

In this Intel Conversations in the Cloud audio podcast: Michael Hall, director of technology and ecosystem enablement at Intel, joins host Jake Smith to talk how Intel works with partners to ensure the market is properly prepared for technology coming out three to five years into the future. The two talk about how the PCIe standard is evolving for lower-latency and all the compatibly and testing work that goes into next generation chips. Michael also talks about what changes he’s excited about in the industry. Follow Jake on Twitter: twitter.com/jakesmithintel

--2 w ago
Comments
How Intel Prepares Partners for New Technology – Conversations in the Cloud – Episode 213

At the OpenMP Forefront

Who better to have a spicy discussion with about #OpenMP than Tim Mattson and Bronis de Supinski? These two have truly lived at the forefront of the amazing, decades-long OpenMP journey, from its inception to its preeminence as a foundational tool for HPC application programmers. Listen to what’s coming in 5.1 and beyond, how the C++ ecosystem is evolving, why Python in HPC, and have fun as these two razz each other. Guests: Bronis de Supinski, Chief Technology Officer, Livermore Computing, Lawrence Livermore National Lab; Chair, OpenMP Language Committee Tim Mattson, Senior Principal Engineer, and Manager, Programming Systems Research Group, Intel To learn more: OpenMP.org Intel oneAPI HPC Toolkit oneAPI

--3 w ago
Comments
At the OpenMP Forefront

A Modern History of AI with Turing Award Winner Yann LeCun – Intel on AI Season 2, Episode 8

In this episode of Intel on AI guest Yann LeCun, chief AI scientist at Facebook and professor at NYU, joins host Abigail Hing Wen to talk about the history and adoption of AI. Considered one of the “godfathers of AI” and an ACM Turing Award Laureate, Yann has seen the ups and downs of AI for decades. Yann and Abigail talk about the origins of AI, how the ideas and advancements in technology proliferated, and what the future of AI holds. Follow Yann on Twitter at: twitter.com/ylecun Follow Abigail on Twitter at: twitter.com/abigailhingwen Learn more about the future of AI at: intel.com/ai

--3 w ago
Comments
A Modern History of AI with Turing Award Winner Yann LeCun – Intel on AI Season 2, Episode 8

Celebrating Women Innovators: Two Trailblazers Who Are Advancing Technology

Denisa Constantinescu, a PhD student in Mechatronics, and a researcher in the Computer Architecture Department at the University of Malaga, and Maura Tokay, a lead software programmer at Science Systems and Applications, Inc., and a computer scientist within the Department of Agriculture, share how their work is helping advance the fields of robotics, economics, manufacturing, agriculture and more, supported by oneAPI and the Intel DevCloud. They inspire us with glimpses of their journeys into tech, and what they’re looking forward to. Guests: Denisa Constantinescu, a PhD student in mechatronics and a researcher in the Computer Architecture Department at the University of Malaga Maura Tokay, computer scientist and lead software programmer at Science Systems and Applications, Inc., and recent Master’s graduate at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) To learn more: denisa-c.com devmesh.intel.com/projects/predicting-corn-wheat-and-soybean-yield oneapi.com/events/devcon2...

--3 w ago
Comments
Celebrating Women Innovators: Two Trailblazers Who Are Advancing Technology

Realizing The Agile Manifesto

Rapid iteration that has become essential to technology innovation is something well defined in the Manifesto for Agile Software Development. We are uncovering better ways of developing software by doing it and helping others do it. Through this work we have come to value: individuals and interactions over processes and tools; working software over comprehensive documentation; customer collaboration over contract negotiation; responding to change over following a plan. That is, while there is value in the items on the right, we value the items on the left more. Follow the enterprise cloud tech revolution at The Forecast by Nutanix.

--3 w ago
Comments
Realizing The Agile Manifesto

Matthew Zachary – Making Noise and Making a Difference that is Music to Patient’s Ears

Matthew Zachary, CEO ofOffscrip Media has had multiple careers despite the fact that he shouldn’t have had any. He had studied to be a concert pianist and composer and conductor through college, but at the age of 21, on his way to study in a USC graduate music program with Hans Zimmer, he was diagnosed with a rare brain cancer and told he had 6 months to live. That was in 1995. Matthew credits his uncle, a geneticist, with saving his life, serving as his medical “Sherpa” and helping him “having the chutzpah to challenge established treatment.” But his healthcare experience, and especially the 6 years it took to recover his immune system post-treatment, made clear to him that young patients weren’t getting the information they needed nor the support required to thrive after a medical crisis. Matthew had a thriving media career when a chance meeting of another recovered patient who had the same brain cancer led him to realize that there was a vast gap between patients’ need for...

--3 w ago
Comments
Matthew Zachary – Making Noise and Making a Difference that is Music to Patient’s Ears
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