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LSE IQ podcast

London School of Economics and Political Science

71
Followers
106
Plays
LSE IQ podcast

LSE IQ podcast

London School of Economics and Political Science

71
Followers
106
Plays
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About Us

LSE IQ is a monthly podcast from the London School of Economics and Political Science in which we ask some of the smartest social scientists - and other experts - to answer intelligent questions about economics, politics or society. #LSEIQ

Latest Episodes

Is perfect the enemy of the possible?

Contributor(s): Dr Thomas Curran | Jess Winterstein speaks to Dr Thomas Curran about the potential pitfalls of wanting to be perfect. Our society values perfection, but is the concept of perfect really that good for us? The latest episode of LSE IQ explores perfectionism. In this bitesized episode of the LSE IQ podcast, Jess Winterstein speaks to Dr Thomas Curran, Associate Professor in the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science at LSE. While aspiring to perfection may still be viewed positively by many, Dr Curran’s research reveals that the drive to be the best can potentially do more harm than good. Are the potential downsides worth it when balanced against the possible achievements that can come from being a perfectionist? In a discussion which explores the realities of being a perfectionist, we ask, is perfection really worth it? Contributors Dr Thomas Curran https://www.lse.ac.uk/PBS/People/Dr-Tom-Curran Research A test of social learning and parent socialization perspectives on the development of perfectionism by Thomas Curran, Daniel J Madigan, Andrew P Hill and Annett Victoria Stornæs https://www.researchgate.net/publication/339433945_A_test_of_social_learning_and_parent_socialization_perspectives_on_the_development_of_perfectionism Perfectionism Is Increasing Over Time: A Meta-Analysis of Birth Cohort Differences From 1989 to 2016 by Thomas Curran and Andrew P. Hill http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/101352/1/Curran_Hill2018.pdf

17 min2 w ago
Comments
Is perfect the enemy of the possible?

Can we afford the super-rich?

Contributor(s): Paul Krugman, Andy Summers, Dr Luna Glucksberg | The coronavirus crisis has devastated economies and brought existing inequalities into sharper focus. Will it result in higher taxes on income and wealth, as we saw after the Great Depression and WWII? Or will the top 1 per cent continue to pull away from the rest of society? Exploring the question, ‘Can we afford the super-rich?’, Joanna Bale talks to Paul Krugman, Andy Summers and Luna Glucksberg. Research links: Arguing with Zombies: Economics, Politics, and the Fight for a Better Future by Paul Krugman. Capital Gains and UK Inequality by Arun Advani and Andy Summers. A gendered ethnography of elites by Luna Glucksberg.

35 minSEP 1
Comments
Can we afford the super-rich?

How can we tackle air pollution?

Contributor(s): Rosamund Adoo-Kissi-Debrah, Dr Ute Collier, Dr Sefi Roth, Dr Thomas Smith | Seven million people die of air pollution, worldwide, every year.Thisepisode of LSE IQaskshow this invisible killer can be tackled. Sue Windebank speaks toRosamundAdoo-Kissi-Debrahabout her campaigning workforbothclean air and a new inquest into the causesof her daughter’s death.In2013,herdaughter Ella Robertadiedfrom a rare and severe form of asthma – she was just nine years old.According toan expert reportthere was a "real prospect” that without unlawful levels of air pollution neartheirhome, Ella would not have died. As well as theimpact on health,the episode looks at theeffectsof air pollution on crime and education. It also examinesair pollution on the London Underground, forest fires and clean cooking. Addressingthese issueare:Dr Ute Collier,Head of Energy at Practical Action; DrSefiRoth,Assistant Professor of Environmental Economicsat LSE; and Dr Thomas Smith, Assistant Professor in Environmental Geographyat LSE. Contributors Rosamund Adoo-Kissi-Debrah Dr Ute Collier DrSefiRoth Dr Thomas Smith Research ‘Crime is in the Air: The Contemporaneous Relationship between Air Pollution and Crime’by Malvina Brody,SefiRoth and Lutz Sager, a discussion paper by IZA Institute of Labor Economics. ‘The Long-Run Economic Consequences of High-Stakes Examinations: Evidence from Transitory Variation in Pollution’by Avraham Ebenstein, Victor Lavy andSefiRoth in theAmerican Economic Journal: Applied Economics. ‘Spatial variability of fine particulate matter pollution (PM2.5) on the London Underground network’by Brynmor M Saunders, James D Smith, T.E.L Smith, David Green and B Barratt in the journalUrban Climate. ‘Review of emissions fromsmoulderingpeat fires and their contribution to regional haze episodes’YuqiHu, Nieves Fernandez-Anez, T.E.L Smith and Guillermo Rein in theInternational Journal of Wildland Fire.

45 minAUG 4
Comments
How can we tackle air pollution?

Is big data good for our health?

Contributor(s): Dr Stephen Roberts, Dr Leeza Osipenko, Professor Barbara Prainsack, Dr James Somauroo | With more and more information about us available electronically and online, this episode of LSE IQ asks, ‘Is big data good for our health?’ Advances in bio-medical technologies, along with electronic health records and the information we generate through our mobile phones, Smart Watches or Fit bits, our social media posts and search engine queries, mean that there is a torrent of information about our bodies, our health and our diseases out there. Alongside this, the tremendous growth in computing power and data storage means that this ‘Big Data’ can be stored and aggregated and then analysed by sophisticated algorithms for connections, comparisons and insights. The promise of all of this is that big data will create opportunities for medical breakthroughs, help tailor medical interventions to us as individuals and create technologies that will speed up and improve healthcare...

39 minJUL 8
Comments
Is big data good for our health?

What does gender have to do with pandemics?

Contributor(s): Clare Wenham | A special bite-sized episode of LSE IQ asks, “What does gender have to do with pandemics?” Cholera, Ebola, Influenza, MERS, SARs, Smallpox, Yellow fever, Zika and of course novel Coronavirus – these are just some of the pandemic, epidemic diseases listed by the World Health Organisation. And until a few months ago, many of us – particularly in the West – had remained comfortably unaffected by these terrible diseases. Yet today it seems dreadfully routine to consume daily infection rates and sobering death tolls. And while the exact figures are unclear – men seem to be dying at a far higher rate. So it might be strange to be focus on women at a time like this. But in this episode Sue Windebank speaks to Dr Clare Wenham, Assistant Professor of Global Health Policy at LSE about why it’s so important to think about gender when responding to epidemics and pandemics.

19 minMAY 5
Comments
What does gender have to do with pandemics?

Are we doomed, or can the climate crisis be averted?

Contributor(s): Bob Ward, Svenja Surminski, Ivan, XR | This month’s episode of the LSE IQ podcast asks if the climate crisis can be averted. If you can, cast your mind back a few months. Can you remember a time when toilet roll wasn’t a prized possession? Or when going out meant more than a trip to the supermarket? You may recall talk of another crisis, one that threatened millions of lives and livelihoods. In the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, this episode turns its attention back to this other threat to our world: climate change. One of the few positives to emerge from the pandemic is a dramatic decline in greenhouse gas emissions. Both China and Europe are forecast to emit 25% less greenhouse gases in 2020 and in New York carbon monoxide levels have already dropped by 50%. As city smogs lift, fewer people are predicted to suffer strokes, or contract heart disease and lung cancer. While this drop will only be temporary, does the pandemic point to how bold action on the clima...

39 minAPR 7
Comments
Are we doomed, or can the climate crisis be averted?

LSE IQ Episode 31 | Is corruption inevitable?

Contributor(s): Michael Muthukrishna, Sandra Sequeira, Jonathan Weigel | Welcome to LSE IQ, the award-winning podcast where we ask social scientists and other experts to answer one intelligent question. In this episode Jess Winterstein asks, "Is corruption inevitable?" Bribery, extortion, cronyism, nepotism – corruption comes in many forms, with varying levels of legality, it costs countries trillions of dollars per year and causes great damage to a nation’s economic prosperity and reputation. Yet despite regular pledges of governments around the world to combat it, corruption still flourishes. Exploring the question, ‘Is corruption inevitable?’, Jess Winterstein talks to Michael Muthukrishna, Sandra Sequeira and Jonathan Weigel Corruption, Cooperation, and the Evolution of Prosocial Institutions by Michael Muthukrishna http://www.lse.ac.uk/lacc/publications/PDFs/Muthukrishna-Corruption-Cooperation-Prosocial-Institutions.pdf Corrupting cooperation and how anti-corruption strateg...

42 minMAR 3
Comments
LSE IQ Episode 31 | Is corruption inevitable?

LSE IQ Episode 30 | How do we stop knife crime?

Contributor(s): Yvonne Lawson, Professor Tom Kirchmaier, Carmen Vila-Llera, Janet Foster, Kerris Cooper | Knife crime in England and Wales hit a record high in 2019, up by 7% on the previous year. A disproportionate number of victims - and perpetrators - are young and disadvantaged. Exploring the question, ‘How do we stop knife crime?’, Joanna Bale talks to Kerris Cooper, Janet Foster, Tom Kirchmaier, Yvonne Lawson and Carmen Villa-Llera. Research links: Physical safety and Security: Policies, spending and outcomes 2015-2020 by Kerris Cooper and Nicola Lacey. The Real Sherlocks: Murder Investigators at Work by Janet Foster (due for publication in 2020)

39 minJAN 18
Comments
LSE IQ Episode 30 | How do we stop knife crime?

LSE IQ Episode 29 | What's the secret to happiness?

Contributor(s): Professor Paul Dolan, Professor Lord Richard Layard, Liz Zeidler | This month we have raided the LSE IQ archives for an episode from 2017 when we ask, ‘What’s the secret to happiness?’ Western societies have been getting steadily richer for several decades, but social scientists have shown that we are no happier for it. In fact we now have more depression, more alcoholism and more crime. Why does happiness elude so many of us and what can we do about it? Joanna Bale talks to LSE’s Paul Dolan and Richard Layard, and Liz Zeidler of the Happy City Initiative

27 min2019 NOV 13
Comments
LSE IQ Episode 29 | What's the secret to happiness?

LSE IQ Episode 28 | Is the 21st Century the Chinese century?

Contributor(s): Professor Christopher Coker, Dr Debin Ma, Dr Yu Jie | Welcome to LSE IQ, the award-winning podcast where we ask social scientists and other experts to answer one intelligent question. In this episode Sue Windebank asks, “Is the 21st Century the Chinese century?” This month sees the 70th anniversary of the People’s Republic of China. In 1949 the Chinese Communist Party won the Chinese Civil War. Having overthrown the nationalist government of the Republic of China, Mao Zedong declared the People’s Republic on October 1st in Tiananmen Square. The last 70 years have been tumultuous for the People’s Republic of China. Under Mao it experienced economic break down and societal chaos. Famously the Great Leap Forward, a campaign designed to industrialise and modernise the economy, led to the largest famine in history, with millions of people dying of starvation. And yet today, after widespread market-economy reforms started by Deng Xiaoping in the 1970s, China is the se...

44 min2019 OCT 7
Comments
LSE IQ Episode 28 | Is the 21st Century the Chinese century?

Latest Episodes

Is perfect the enemy of the possible?

Contributor(s): Dr Thomas Curran | Jess Winterstein speaks to Dr Thomas Curran about the potential pitfalls of wanting to be perfect. Our society values perfection, but is the concept of perfect really that good for us? The latest episode of LSE IQ explores perfectionism. In this bitesized episode of the LSE IQ podcast, Jess Winterstein speaks to Dr Thomas Curran, Associate Professor in the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science at LSE. While aspiring to perfection may still be viewed positively by many, Dr Curran’s research reveals that the drive to be the best can potentially do more harm than good. Are the potential downsides worth it when balanced against the possible achievements that can come from being a perfectionist? In a discussion which explores the realities of being a perfectionist, we ask, is perfection really worth it? Contributors Dr Thomas Curran https://www.lse.ac.uk/PBS/People/Dr-Tom-Curran Research A test of social learning and parent socialization perspectives on the development of perfectionism by Thomas Curran, Daniel J Madigan, Andrew P Hill and Annett Victoria Stornæs https://www.researchgate.net/publication/339433945_A_test_of_social_learning_and_parent_socialization_perspectives_on_the_development_of_perfectionism Perfectionism Is Increasing Over Time: A Meta-Analysis of Birth Cohort Differences From 1989 to 2016 by Thomas Curran and Andrew P. Hill http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/101352/1/Curran_Hill2018.pdf

17 min2 w ago
Comments
Is perfect the enemy of the possible?

Can we afford the super-rich?

Contributor(s): Paul Krugman, Andy Summers, Dr Luna Glucksberg | The coronavirus crisis has devastated economies and brought existing inequalities into sharper focus. Will it result in higher taxes on income and wealth, as we saw after the Great Depression and WWII? Or will the top 1 per cent continue to pull away from the rest of society? Exploring the question, ‘Can we afford the super-rich?’, Joanna Bale talks to Paul Krugman, Andy Summers and Luna Glucksberg. Research links: Arguing with Zombies: Economics, Politics, and the Fight for a Better Future by Paul Krugman. Capital Gains and UK Inequality by Arun Advani and Andy Summers. A gendered ethnography of elites by Luna Glucksberg.

35 minSEP 1
Comments
Can we afford the super-rich?

How can we tackle air pollution?

Contributor(s): Rosamund Adoo-Kissi-Debrah, Dr Ute Collier, Dr Sefi Roth, Dr Thomas Smith | Seven million people die of air pollution, worldwide, every year.Thisepisode of LSE IQaskshow this invisible killer can be tackled. Sue Windebank speaks toRosamundAdoo-Kissi-Debrahabout her campaigning workforbothclean air and a new inquest into the causesof her daughter’s death.In2013,herdaughter Ella Robertadiedfrom a rare and severe form of asthma – she was just nine years old.According toan expert reportthere was a "real prospect” that without unlawful levels of air pollution neartheirhome, Ella would not have died. As well as theimpact on health,the episode looks at theeffectsof air pollution on crime and education. It also examinesair pollution on the London Underground, forest fires and clean cooking. Addressingthese issueare:Dr Ute Collier,Head of Energy at Practical Action; DrSefiRoth,Assistant Professor of Environmental Economicsat LSE; and Dr Thomas Smith, Assistant Professor in Environmental Geographyat LSE. Contributors Rosamund Adoo-Kissi-Debrah Dr Ute Collier DrSefiRoth Dr Thomas Smith Research ‘Crime is in the Air: The Contemporaneous Relationship between Air Pollution and Crime’by Malvina Brody,SefiRoth and Lutz Sager, a discussion paper by IZA Institute of Labor Economics. ‘The Long-Run Economic Consequences of High-Stakes Examinations: Evidence from Transitory Variation in Pollution’by Avraham Ebenstein, Victor Lavy andSefiRoth in theAmerican Economic Journal: Applied Economics. ‘Spatial variability of fine particulate matter pollution (PM2.5) on the London Underground network’by Brynmor M Saunders, James D Smith, T.E.L Smith, David Green and B Barratt in the journalUrban Climate. ‘Review of emissions fromsmoulderingpeat fires and their contribution to regional haze episodes’YuqiHu, Nieves Fernandez-Anez, T.E.L Smith and Guillermo Rein in theInternational Journal of Wildland Fire.

45 minAUG 4
Comments
How can we tackle air pollution?

Is big data good for our health?

Contributor(s): Dr Stephen Roberts, Dr Leeza Osipenko, Professor Barbara Prainsack, Dr James Somauroo | With more and more information about us available electronically and online, this episode of LSE IQ asks, ‘Is big data good for our health?’ Advances in bio-medical technologies, along with electronic health records and the information we generate through our mobile phones, Smart Watches or Fit bits, our social media posts and search engine queries, mean that there is a torrent of information about our bodies, our health and our diseases out there. Alongside this, the tremendous growth in computing power and data storage means that this ‘Big Data’ can be stored and aggregated and then analysed by sophisticated algorithms for connections, comparisons and insights. The promise of all of this is that big data will create opportunities for medical breakthroughs, help tailor medical interventions to us as individuals and create technologies that will speed up and improve healthcare...

39 minJUL 8
Comments
Is big data good for our health?

What does gender have to do with pandemics?

Contributor(s): Clare Wenham | A special bite-sized episode of LSE IQ asks, “What does gender have to do with pandemics?” Cholera, Ebola, Influenza, MERS, SARs, Smallpox, Yellow fever, Zika and of course novel Coronavirus – these are just some of the pandemic, epidemic diseases listed by the World Health Organisation. And until a few months ago, many of us – particularly in the West – had remained comfortably unaffected by these terrible diseases. Yet today it seems dreadfully routine to consume daily infection rates and sobering death tolls. And while the exact figures are unclear – men seem to be dying at a far higher rate. So it might be strange to be focus on women at a time like this. But in this episode Sue Windebank speaks to Dr Clare Wenham, Assistant Professor of Global Health Policy at LSE about why it’s so important to think about gender when responding to epidemics and pandemics.

19 minMAY 5
Comments
What does gender have to do with pandemics?

Are we doomed, or can the climate crisis be averted?

Contributor(s): Bob Ward, Svenja Surminski, Ivan, XR | This month’s episode of the LSE IQ podcast asks if the climate crisis can be averted. If you can, cast your mind back a few months. Can you remember a time when toilet roll wasn’t a prized possession? Or when going out meant more than a trip to the supermarket? You may recall talk of another crisis, one that threatened millions of lives and livelihoods. In the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, this episode turns its attention back to this other threat to our world: climate change. One of the few positives to emerge from the pandemic is a dramatic decline in greenhouse gas emissions. Both China and Europe are forecast to emit 25% less greenhouse gases in 2020 and in New York carbon monoxide levels have already dropped by 50%. As city smogs lift, fewer people are predicted to suffer strokes, or contract heart disease and lung cancer. While this drop will only be temporary, does the pandemic point to how bold action on the clima...

39 minAPR 7
Comments
Are we doomed, or can the climate crisis be averted?

LSE IQ Episode 31 | Is corruption inevitable?

Contributor(s): Michael Muthukrishna, Sandra Sequeira, Jonathan Weigel | Welcome to LSE IQ, the award-winning podcast where we ask social scientists and other experts to answer one intelligent question. In this episode Jess Winterstein asks, "Is corruption inevitable?" Bribery, extortion, cronyism, nepotism – corruption comes in many forms, with varying levels of legality, it costs countries trillions of dollars per year and causes great damage to a nation’s economic prosperity and reputation. Yet despite regular pledges of governments around the world to combat it, corruption still flourishes. Exploring the question, ‘Is corruption inevitable?’, Jess Winterstein talks to Michael Muthukrishna, Sandra Sequeira and Jonathan Weigel Corruption, Cooperation, and the Evolution of Prosocial Institutions by Michael Muthukrishna http://www.lse.ac.uk/lacc/publications/PDFs/Muthukrishna-Corruption-Cooperation-Prosocial-Institutions.pdf Corrupting cooperation and how anti-corruption strateg...

42 minMAR 3
Comments
LSE IQ Episode 31 | Is corruption inevitable?

LSE IQ Episode 30 | How do we stop knife crime?

Contributor(s): Yvonne Lawson, Professor Tom Kirchmaier, Carmen Vila-Llera, Janet Foster, Kerris Cooper | Knife crime in England and Wales hit a record high in 2019, up by 7% on the previous year. A disproportionate number of victims - and perpetrators - are young and disadvantaged. Exploring the question, ‘How do we stop knife crime?’, Joanna Bale talks to Kerris Cooper, Janet Foster, Tom Kirchmaier, Yvonne Lawson and Carmen Villa-Llera. Research links: Physical safety and Security: Policies, spending and outcomes 2015-2020 by Kerris Cooper and Nicola Lacey. The Real Sherlocks: Murder Investigators at Work by Janet Foster (due for publication in 2020)

39 minJAN 18
Comments
LSE IQ Episode 30 | How do we stop knife crime?

LSE IQ Episode 29 | What's the secret to happiness?

Contributor(s): Professor Paul Dolan, Professor Lord Richard Layard, Liz Zeidler | This month we have raided the LSE IQ archives for an episode from 2017 when we ask, ‘What’s the secret to happiness?’ Western societies have been getting steadily richer for several decades, but social scientists have shown that we are no happier for it. In fact we now have more depression, more alcoholism and more crime. Why does happiness elude so many of us and what can we do about it? Joanna Bale talks to LSE’s Paul Dolan and Richard Layard, and Liz Zeidler of the Happy City Initiative

27 min2019 NOV 13
Comments
LSE IQ Episode 29 | What's the secret to happiness?

LSE IQ Episode 28 | Is the 21st Century the Chinese century?

Contributor(s): Professor Christopher Coker, Dr Debin Ma, Dr Yu Jie | Welcome to LSE IQ, the award-winning podcast where we ask social scientists and other experts to answer one intelligent question. In this episode Sue Windebank asks, “Is the 21st Century the Chinese century?” This month sees the 70th anniversary of the People’s Republic of China. In 1949 the Chinese Communist Party won the Chinese Civil War. Having overthrown the nationalist government of the Republic of China, Mao Zedong declared the People’s Republic on October 1st in Tiananmen Square. The last 70 years have been tumultuous for the People’s Republic of China. Under Mao it experienced economic break down and societal chaos. Famously the Great Leap Forward, a campaign designed to industrialise and modernise the economy, led to the largest famine in history, with millions of people dying of starvation. And yet today, after widespread market-economy reforms started by Deng Xiaoping in the 1970s, China is the se...

44 min2019 OCT 7
Comments
LSE IQ Episode 28 | Is the 21st Century the Chinese century?
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