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NDM Public Engagement

Oxford University

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NDM Public Engagement

NDM Public Engagement

Oxford University

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About Us

The NDM recognises that public engagement is vital in order to educate, inform and build a relationship with the community. Our scientists are actively engaging in open discussion, and meeting people to debate, listen and learn.

Latest Episodes

Outreach and Impact - Engaging with the community

The Nuffield Department of Medicine is committed to the pursuit of academic excellence and the positive impact of its research on the health and wellbeing of the global community. Reaching out to the wider community, through public engagement, is an increasingly important component of medical research. In addition, the societal and economic impact of medical research is fast becoming an integral part of research assessment. NDM Strategic is dedicated to supporting its researchers in actively engaging with the public, as well as ensuring everyone in the Department is aware of the options available to them for translating research into impact.

1 MIN2013 NOV 12
Comments
Outreach and Impact - Engaging with the community

Science Oxford Live 2013 - Public Engagement

The Nuffield Department of Medicine recognises that public engagement is vital to educate, inform and build relationships with the community. Our scientists are actively engaging in open discussion, meeting people to debate, listen and learn. Our series of evening lectures at Science Oxford Live, as part of the Healthy Season in spring 2013, was a great success. We are grateful to all of our speakers: Dr Julian Knight (Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics), Professor Tim Key (Cancer Epidemiology Unit), Professor Adrian Hill and Dr Simon Draper (Jenner Institute), Professor Chas Bountra and Professor Stefan Knapp (Structural Genomics Consortium), and Dr Dianne Newbury (Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics) for contributing to five memorable evenings.

1 MIN2013 SEP 18
Comments
Science Oxford Live 2013 - Public Engagement

Freeing Voices: Your questions

Specific Language Impairment affects hundreds of thousands of British children, and causes them to have difficulties speaking and understanding language. Can the environment have an effect? Is Specific Language Impairment reflected in IQ scores? How will this research help people with Specific Language Impairment? Where does your research go next? Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

3 MIN2013 JUL 17
Comments
Freeing Voices: Your questions

Drug Discovery: Your questions

How does medicine work? How are new drugs made? What role does the pharmaceutical industry play? Professors Stefan Knapp and Chas Bountra joined Science Oxford Live in spring 2013 for an evening of Scientists on the sofa, to take your questions. Have you really got a model for how this ought to work? I wanted to comment about the publication of negative findings. Have you been involved? What is your view on this? How quickly do you think it will happen? You spoke about the research institutes closing down; are they closing down in the UK and relocating, or are they just closing? Is there something to be said for slowing, or stopping, research for diseases of old age, for example Alzheimer's, and instead concentrating on scanning the genome of very young human beings to see what they might get in their future years? In regards to what you were saying about people reacting differently to a drug; that must mean that for a long time doctors have been prescribing things that don't work, ...

9 MIN2013 JUL 17
Comments
Drug Discovery: Your questions

Freeing Voices

Specific Language Impairment affects hundreds of thousands of British children, and causes them to have difficulties speaking and understanding language. Unlike common speech and language disorders, Specific Language Impairment (SLI), is the impairment of acquisition and language use, which is severe, persistent and often unexpected. SLI is hereditary and is typical of a complex genetic disorder, where certain combinations of functional variants result in less efficient biological processes. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

24 MIN2013 JUL 17
Comments
Freeing Voices

Drug Discovery

How does medicine work? How are new drugs made? What role does the pharmaceutical industry play? Professors Stefan Knapp and Chas Bountra work in the field of drug discovery. They joined Science Oxford talks in spring 2013. Society is increasingly desperate for novel medicine. Most drugs used today were developed more than 40 years ago. With our ageing population, the incidence of diseases such as dementia, cardiovascular disease, and cancer will increase exponentially over the coming years. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

16 MIN2013 JUL 17
Comments
Drug Discovery

Discovery of new medicines and the future of drug development

How does medicine work? How are new drugs made? What role does the pharmaceutical industry play? Professors Stefan Knapp and Chas Bountra work in the field of drug discovery. They joined Science Oxford talks in spring 2013. Over the past 30 to 40 years there have been drastic changes in the way new medicines are developed. Before the 1970s drug development was based on phenotypic assays and 'accidental findings', with an approval process that would often take two to three years to complete. Scientists now have a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to disease development, allowing the selection of 'targets' - regulators which are dysfunctional in the disease - allowing scientists to develop new drugs, which inhibit these cellular targets. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

11 MIN2013 JUL 17
Comments
Discovery of new medicines and the future of drug development
the END

Latest Episodes

Outreach and Impact - Engaging with the community

The Nuffield Department of Medicine is committed to the pursuit of academic excellence and the positive impact of its research on the health and wellbeing of the global community. Reaching out to the wider community, through public engagement, is an increasingly important component of medical research. In addition, the societal and economic impact of medical research is fast becoming an integral part of research assessment. NDM Strategic is dedicated to supporting its researchers in actively engaging with the public, as well as ensuring everyone in the Department is aware of the options available to them for translating research into impact.

1 MIN2013 NOV 12
Comments
Outreach and Impact - Engaging with the community

Science Oxford Live 2013 - Public Engagement

The Nuffield Department of Medicine recognises that public engagement is vital to educate, inform and build relationships with the community. Our scientists are actively engaging in open discussion, meeting people to debate, listen and learn. Our series of evening lectures at Science Oxford Live, as part of the Healthy Season in spring 2013, was a great success. We are grateful to all of our speakers: Dr Julian Knight (Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics), Professor Tim Key (Cancer Epidemiology Unit), Professor Adrian Hill and Dr Simon Draper (Jenner Institute), Professor Chas Bountra and Professor Stefan Knapp (Structural Genomics Consortium), and Dr Dianne Newbury (Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics) for contributing to five memorable evenings.

1 MIN2013 SEP 18
Comments
Science Oxford Live 2013 - Public Engagement

Freeing Voices: Your questions

Specific Language Impairment affects hundreds of thousands of British children, and causes them to have difficulties speaking and understanding language. Can the environment have an effect? Is Specific Language Impairment reflected in IQ scores? How will this research help people with Specific Language Impairment? Where does your research go next? Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

3 MIN2013 JUL 17
Comments
Freeing Voices: Your questions

Drug Discovery: Your questions

How does medicine work? How are new drugs made? What role does the pharmaceutical industry play? Professors Stefan Knapp and Chas Bountra joined Science Oxford Live in spring 2013 for an evening of Scientists on the sofa, to take your questions. Have you really got a model for how this ought to work? I wanted to comment about the publication of negative findings. Have you been involved? What is your view on this? How quickly do you think it will happen? You spoke about the research institutes closing down; are they closing down in the UK and relocating, or are they just closing? Is there something to be said for slowing, or stopping, research for diseases of old age, for example Alzheimer's, and instead concentrating on scanning the genome of very young human beings to see what they might get in their future years? In regards to what you were saying about people reacting differently to a drug; that must mean that for a long time doctors have been prescribing things that don't work, ...

9 MIN2013 JUL 17
Comments
Drug Discovery: Your questions

Freeing Voices

Specific Language Impairment affects hundreds of thousands of British children, and causes them to have difficulties speaking and understanding language. Unlike common speech and language disorders, Specific Language Impairment (SLI), is the impairment of acquisition and language use, which is severe, persistent and often unexpected. SLI is hereditary and is typical of a complex genetic disorder, where certain combinations of functional variants result in less efficient biological processes. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

24 MIN2013 JUL 17
Comments
Freeing Voices

Drug Discovery

How does medicine work? How are new drugs made? What role does the pharmaceutical industry play? Professors Stefan Knapp and Chas Bountra work in the field of drug discovery. They joined Science Oxford talks in spring 2013. Society is increasingly desperate for novel medicine. Most drugs used today were developed more than 40 years ago. With our ageing population, the incidence of diseases such as dementia, cardiovascular disease, and cancer will increase exponentially over the coming years. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

16 MIN2013 JUL 17
Comments
Drug Discovery

Discovery of new medicines and the future of drug development

How does medicine work? How are new drugs made? What role does the pharmaceutical industry play? Professors Stefan Knapp and Chas Bountra work in the field of drug discovery. They joined Science Oxford talks in spring 2013. Over the past 30 to 40 years there have been drastic changes in the way new medicines are developed. Before the 1970s drug development was based on phenotypic assays and 'accidental findings', with an approval process that would often take two to three years to complete. Scientists now have a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to disease development, allowing the selection of 'targets' - regulators which are dysfunctional in the disease - allowing scientists to develop new drugs, which inhibit these cellular targets. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

11 MIN2013 JUL 17
Comments
Discovery of new medicines and the future of drug development
the END
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