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Wofford Arboretum South Campus

Wofford College

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Wofford Arboretum South Campus

Wofford Arboretum South Campus

Wofford College

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Followers
3
Plays
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Take Wofford's Arboretum tour with you on your iPod as you walk around Wofford's beautiful campus.

Latest Episodes

88.‘Bloodgood’ London Planetree

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 4 – 9 Height: 45 – 55 Spread: 35 – 45 Habit: In youth: pyramidal; At maturity: large, open, wide-spreading outline with massive branches Light: Full sun or very light shade Soil: Deep, rich, moist, well-drained soil preferable but will grow in almost any soil Flowers: not showy; in April Fruit: in 1 diameter ball-like hanging clusters Landscape use: Good for open areas in parks, golf courses, campuses; can be used as a street tree but may grow too large History: First record was in 1663; used as a street tree in London, England; there is no native range since the tree is a hybrid Pests\Problems: American plum borer, sycamore lace bug Problems: cankerstain, anthracnose, Xylella fastidiosa, powdery mildew Significant Features: Good shade tree; good anthracnose resistance

1 MIN2007 JUN 29
Comments
88.‘Bloodgood’ London Planetree

87.‘Carolina #2’ Holly

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 5 – 9 Height: 40 – 50 Spread: 18 – 40 Habit: In youth: openly pyramidal with branches to the ground; At maturity: full, irregular and picturesque Light: Full sun or partial shade Soil: Moist, loose, acidic, well-drained soil preferable Flowers: dull, white, 4-lobed, inconspicuous Fruit: berry-like, dull, red, rounded drupe maturing in October and persisting into the winter Landscape use: Specimen plant; groupings History: Native range is Massachusetts to Florida and west to Missouri and Texas; introduced in 1744 Pests\Problems: Many; leaf miner and scale are particularly troublesome Significant Features: Good, dark green form with heavy bright red fruit production; fairly common in the southeast

55 s2007 JUN 29
Comments
87.‘Carolina #2’ Holly

86.Eastern White Pine

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 3 – 8 Height: 50 – 80 Spread: 20 – 40 Habit: In youth: symmetrical pyramid of soft, pleasant appearance At maturity: crown composed of several horizontal and ascending branches Light: Full sun Soil: Moist, well-drained, fertile soil preferable Flowers: Cones: male cones inconspicuous Fruit: in 3 – 7 long, broad, stalked, light brown cones Landscape use: Handsome and ornamental specimen, valuable for parks, estates and large properties, makes a nice sheared hedge History: Native range is Newfoundland to Manitoba, south to Georgia, Illinois and Iowa; introduced about 1705 Pests\Problems: white pine weevil; Problems: white pine blister rust Significant Features: Great variation in needle color, some keep bluish-green color through winter

55 s2007 JUN 29
Comments
86.Eastern White Pine

85.‘Nellie R. Stevens’ Holly

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 6 – 9 Height: 15 – 25 Spread: about 1/2 – 2/3 Habit: Evergreen shrub or small, broad pyramidal tree Light: Sun to partial shade Soil: Moist, well-drained, fertile soil preferable Flowers: inconspicuous Fruit: red, rounded, 1/4 – 1/3 diameter Landscape use: Useful for hedges, screens or barriers; good ornamental usage History: Hybrid between I. cornuta and I. aquifolium; released by 1954; named for owner, Nellie R. Stevens, Oxford, MD Pests\Problems: None serious Significant Features: Lustrous dark green leaves; heavily fruited; relatively fast growing; one of the best hollies in the southern states

50 s2007 JUN 29
Comments
85.‘Nellie R. Stevens’ Holly

84.‘Green Giant’ Arborvitae

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 4 – 8 Height: 30 – 40 Spread: 15 – 25 Habit: Broad-pyramidal Light: Sun to partial shade Soil: Moist, well-drained, fertile soil preferable Flowers: Cones: inconspicuous Fruit: 1/2 long erect cones Landscape use: Useful as a specimen tree or for hedges in formal and semiformal plantings, groupings, or screens History: Hybrid between T. standishii and T. plicata Pests\Problems: bagworm; Problems: heart rot and butt rot Significant Features: Lustrous, rich, medium green, summer foliage; not green through the seasons as promoted; fast growth rate

44 s2007 JUN 29
Comments
84.‘Green Giant’ Arborvitae

83.‘Hillspire’ Eastern Redcedar

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 2 – 9 Height: 40 – 50 Spread: 8 – 20 ; Size is extremely variable Habit: Symmetrical conical-pyramidal Light: Best in full sun, tolerates shade only when very young Soil: Deep, moist, well-drained loam preferable; tolerant of adverse soil conditions, poor gravelly soils, acidic and basic soils Flowers: Cones: male cones inconspicuous Fruit: globular or ovoid, 1/5 long, berry-like cones Landscape use: Excellent specimen and mass if used with care, useful for windbreaks, hedges and topiary work History: Named ‘Cupressifolia’ in 1964 but that name was taken, renamed ‘Hillspire’; introduced by D. Hill Nursery Co., Dundee, IL Pests\Problems: bagworm; Problems: cedar apple rust Significant Features: Maintains bright green foliage in winter

59 s2007 JUN 29
Comments
83.‘Hillspire’ Eastern Redcedar

82.‘Crippsii’ Hinoki Falsecypress

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 5 – 8 Height: 50 – 75 Spread: 10 – 20 Habit: Broad pyramidal, branches spreading, branchlets broadly frond-like, tops decurving Light: Full sun Soil: Moist, well-drained soil preferable Flowers: Cones: inconspicuous Fruit: short-stalked cones, 1/3 – 3/8 across Landscape use: Useful as a specimen tree History: Native range is Japan and Formosa; introduced in 1861 Pests\Problems: None serious Significant Features: Dark green foliage is handsome; rich golden yellow changing to green within the interior foliage of the plant; yellowish at ends of sprays

45 s2007 JUN 29
Comments
82.‘Crippsii’ Hinoki Falsecypress

81.‘Gold Rider’ Leyland Cypress

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 6 – 10 Height: 60 – 70 with a maximum of 100’ Spread: 1/8 – 1/5 Habit: Noble, evergreen forming a columnar to pyramidal outline; branchlets are planar in arrangement Light: Full sun Soil: Adequate drainage required; adaptable to extremes of soil; Cones: male cones inconspicuous Flowers: Cones: male cones inconspicuous Fruit: 1/2 – 3/4” diameter cone Landscape use: Great for quick screens, groupings, hedges; has been used as a Christmas tree History: Introduced by A. Vegeer, Boskoop; hybrid between Cupressus macrocarpa and Chamaecyparis nootkatensis Pests\Problems: bagworm; Problems: canker, fungi, root rot Significant Features: Withstands salt spray; thins out in shady environments; branchlets are yellow with green tips in winter, changing to deeper yellow with dark yellow margins in summer

1 MIN2007 JUN 29
Comments
81.‘Gold Rider’ Leyland Cypress

80.‘Aurea’ Deodar Cedar

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 6 Height: 30 – 40 Spread: around 15 Habit: In youth: broadly pyramidal; At maturity: wide spreading and flat topped Light: Best in sun or partial shade Soil: Moist, well-drained soil; Cones: male – finger-shaped cones very densely set, more numerous on lower portion of tree Flowers: female – stout, erect cones initially purple in color and found in upper portion of tre Fruit: in 4 long upright cones, found on upper side of branches, green-while developing, finally brown Landscape use: Excellent specimen evergreen because of graceful and pendulous habit; use as specimen tree or screen on smaller properties or areas History: Native range of Deodar cedar is Himalayan Mountains from east Afghanistan to Garwhal; introduced in 1831 Pests\Problems: None serious Significant Features: Slow growth rate compared to the other species; needs full sun for best color development; foliage is golden yellow and is prominent throughout the season

1 MIN2007 JUN 29
Comments
80.‘Aurea’ Deodar Cedar

79.Atlas Cedar

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 6 – 9 Height: 40 – 60 with a maximum of 120 Spread: 30 – 40 with a maximum of 90 – 100 Habit: In youth: overall pyramidal; At maturity: flat-topped with horizontally spreading branches Light: Sun or partial shade Soil: Moist, well-drained, deep, loamy soil preferable, but will tolerate sandy or clay soil; Flowers: Cones: 2 – 3 long male cones; erect female cones in upper part of tree; Fruit: in 2 1/4 – 4 long, glaucous green cones Landscape use: Handsome specimen tree, especially when fully mature; allow ample room for development; History: Native range is Algeria and Morocco on the Atlas Mountains; introduced before 1840; Pests\Problems: Pests: black scale and deodar weevil Problems: tip blight and root rot Significant Features: Bluish-green color, extremely picturesque

57 s2007 JUN 29
Comments
79.Atlas Cedar

Latest Episodes

88.‘Bloodgood’ London Planetree

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 4 – 9 Height: 45 – 55 Spread: 35 – 45 Habit: In youth: pyramidal; At maturity: large, open, wide-spreading outline with massive branches Light: Full sun or very light shade Soil: Deep, rich, moist, well-drained soil preferable but will grow in almost any soil Flowers: not showy; in April Fruit: in 1 diameter ball-like hanging clusters Landscape use: Good for open areas in parks, golf courses, campuses; can be used as a street tree but may grow too large History: First record was in 1663; used as a street tree in London, England; there is no native range since the tree is a hybrid Pests\Problems: American plum borer, sycamore lace bug Problems: cankerstain, anthracnose, Xylella fastidiosa, powdery mildew Significant Features: Good shade tree; good anthracnose resistance

1 MIN2007 JUN 29
Comments
88.‘Bloodgood’ London Planetree

87.‘Carolina #2’ Holly

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 5 – 9 Height: 40 – 50 Spread: 18 – 40 Habit: In youth: openly pyramidal with branches to the ground; At maturity: full, irregular and picturesque Light: Full sun or partial shade Soil: Moist, loose, acidic, well-drained soil preferable Flowers: dull, white, 4-lobed, inconspicuous Fruit: berry-like, dull, red, rounded drupe maturing in October and persisting into the winter Landscape use: Specimen plant; groupings History: Native range is Massachusetts to Florida and west to Missouri and Texas; introduced in 1744 Pests\Problems: Many; leaf miner and scale are particularly troublesome Significant Features: Good, dark green form with heavy bright red fruit production; fairly common in the southeast

55 s2007 JUN 29
Comments
87.‘Carolina #2’ Holly

86.Eastern White Pine

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 3 – 8 Height: 50 – 80 Spread: 20 – 40 Habit: In youth: symmetrical pyramid of soft, pleasant appearance At maturity: crown composed of several horizontal and ascending branches Light: Full sun Soil: Moist, well-drained, fertile soil preferable Flowers: Cones: male cones inconspicuous Fruit: in 3 – 7 long, broad, stalked, light brown cones Landscape use: Handsome and ornamental specimen, valuable for parks, estates and large properties, makes a nice sheared hedge History: Native range is Newfoundland to Manitoba, south to Georgia, Illinois and Iowa; introduced about 1705 Pests\Problems: white pine weevil; Problems: white pine blister rust Significant Features: Great variation in needle color, some keep bluish-green color through winter

55 s2007 JUN 29
Comments
86.Eastern White Pine

85.‘Nellie R. Stevens’ Holly

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 6 – 9 Height: 15 – 25 Spread: about 1/2 – 2/3 Habit: Evergreen shrub or small, broad pyramidal tree Light: Sun to partial shade Soil: Moist, well-drained, fertile soil preferable Flowers: inconspicuous Fruit: red, rounded, 1/4 – 1/3 diameter Landscape use: Useful for hedges, screens or barriers; good ornamental usage History: Hybrid between I. cornuta and I. aquifolium; released by 1954; named for owner, Nellie R. Stevens, Oxford, MD Pests\Problems: None serious Significant Features: Lustrous dark green leaves; heavily fruited; relatively fast growing; one of the best hollies in the southern states

50 s2007 JUN 29
Comments
85.‘Nellie R. Stevens’ Holly

84.‘Green Giant’ Arborvitae

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 4 – 8 Height: 30 – 40 Spread: 15 – 25 Habit: Broad-pyramidal Light: Sun to partial shade Soil: Moist, well-drained, fertile soil preferable Flowers: Cones: inconspicuous Fruit: 1/2 long erect cones Landscape use: Useful as a specimen tree or for hedges in formal and semiformal plantings, groupings, or screens History: Hybrid between T. standishii and T. plicata Pests\Problems: bagworm; Problems: heart rot and butt rot Significant Features: Lustrous, rich, medium green, summer foliage; not green through the seasons as promoted; fast growth rate

44 s2007 JUN 29
Comments
84.‘Green Giant’ Arborvitae

83.‘Hillspire’ Eastern Redcedar

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 2 – 9 Height: 40 – 50 Spread: 8 – 20 ; Size is extremely variable Habit: Symmetrical conical-pyramidal Light: Best in full sun, tolerates shade only when very young Soil: Deep, moist, well-drained loam preferable; tolerant of adverse soil conditions, poor gravelly soils, acidic and basic soils Flowers: Cones: male cones inconspicuous Fruit: globular or ovoid, 1/5 long, berry-like cones Landscape use: Excellent specimen and mass if used with care, useful for windbreaks, hedges and topiary work History: Named ‘Cupressifolia’ in 1964 but that name was taken, renamed ‘Hillspire’; introduced by D. Hill Nursery Co., Dundee, IL Pests\Problems: bagworm; Problems: cedar apple rust Significant Features: Maintains bright green foliage in winter

59 s2007 JUN 29
Comments
83.‘Hillspire’ Eastern Redcedar

82.‘Crippsii’ Hinoki Falsecypress

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 5 – 8 Height: 50 – 75 Spread: 10 – 20 Habit: Broad pyramidal, branches spreading, branchlets broadly frond-like, tops decurving Light: Full sun Soil: Moist, well-drained soil preferable Flowers: Cones: inconspicuous Fruit: short-stalked cones, 1/3 – 3/8 across Landscape use: Useful as a specimen tree History: Native range is Japan and Formosa; introduced in 1861 Pests\Problems: None serious Significant Features: Dark green foliage is handsome; rich golden yellow changing to green within the interior foliage of the plant; yellowish at ends of sprays

45 s2007 JUN 29
Comments
82.‘Crippsii’ Hinoki Falsecypress

81.‘Gold Rider’ Leyland Cypress

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 6 – 10 Height: 60 – 70 with a maximum of 100’ Spread: 1/8 – 1/5 Habit: Noble, evergreen forming a columnar to pyramidal outline; branchlets are planar in arrangement Light: Full sun Soil: Adequate drainage required; adaptable to extremes of soil; Cones: male cones inconspicuous Flowers: Cones: male cones inconspicuous Fruit: 1/2 – 3/4” diameter cone Landscape use: Great for quick screens, groupings, hedges; has been used as a Christmas tree History: Introduced by A. Vegeer, Boskoop; hybrid between Cupressus macrocarpa and Chamaecyparis nootkatensis Pests\Problems: bagworm; Problems: canker, fungi, root rot Significant Features: Withstands salt spray; thins out in shady environments; branchlets are yellow with green tips in winter, changing to deeper yellow with dark yellow margins in summer

1 MIN2007 JUN 29
Comments
81.‘Gold Rider’ Leyland Cypress

80.‘Aurea’ Deodar Cedar

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 6 Height: 30 – 40 Spread: around 15 Habit: In youth: broadly pyramidal; At maturity: wide spreading and flat topped Light: Best in sun or partial shade Soil: Moist, well-drained soil; Cones: male – finger-shaped cones very densely set, more numerous on lower portion of tree Flowers: female – stout, erect cones initially purple in color and found in upper portion of tre Fruit: in 4 long upright cones, found on upper side of branches, green-while developing, finally brown Landscape use: Excellent specimen evergreen because of graceful and pendulous habit; use as specimen tree or screen on smaller properties or areas History: Native range of Deodar cedar is Himalayan Mountains from east Afghanistan to Garwhal; introduced in 1831 Pests\Problems: None serious Significant Features: Slow growth rate compared to the other species; needs full sun for best color development; foliage is golden yellow and is prominent throughout the season

1 MIN2007 JUN 29
Comments
80.‘Aurea’ Deodar Cedar

79.Atlas Cedar

Tree Details Hardiness zone: 6 – 9 Height: 40 – 60 with a maximum of 120 Spread: 30 – 40 with a maximum of 90 – 100 Habit: In youth: overall pyramidal; At maturity: flat-topped with horizontally spreading branches Light: Sun or partial shade Soil: Moist, well-drained, deep, loamy soil preferable, but will tolerate sandy or clay soil; Flowers: Cones: 2 – 3 long male cones; erect female cones in upper part of tree; Fruit: in 2 1/4 – 4 long, glaucous green cones Landscape use: Handsome specimen tree, especially when fully mature; allow ample room for development; History: Native range is Algeria and Morocco on the Atlas Mountains; introduced before 1840; Pests\Problems: Pests: black scale and deodar weevil Problems: tip blight and root rot Significant Features: Bluish-green color, extremely picturesque

57 s2007 JUN 29
Comments
79.Atlas Cedar
hmly
himalayaプレミアムへようこそ聴き放題のオーディオブックをお楽しみください。