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Brian Lehrer: A Daily Politics Podcast

WNYC Studios

69
Followers
1.5K
Plays
Brian Lehrer: A Daily Politics Podcast

Brian Lehrer: A Daily Politics Podcast

WNYC Studios

69
Followers
1.5K
Plays
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About Us

Daily thoughtful conversation about the latest news and politics.

Latest Episodes

New Debate Rules, Old Republican Divides

New rules mean that at Thursday's presidential debate, there won't be as much interrupting as the first one. So what should we expect? On today's show, Susan Glasser, staff writer for The New Yorker, CNN global affairs analyst and co-author, with Peter Baker, of The Man Who Ran Washington: the Life and Times of Jim Baker III (Doubleday, 2020), talks about the latest national political news.

19 min4 d ago
Comments
New Debate Rules, Old Republican Divides

Trump Goes Negative On Affirmative Action

Trump's DOJ is fighting in court to end affirmative action in college admissions. So what's behind the argument that this policy meant to address racial bias is, in fact, racist? On today's show, Erwin Chemerinsky,professor and dean of Berkeley Law, and the author of several books, including We the People: A Progressive Reading of the Constitution for the Twenty-First Century (Picador Macmillan, 2018) and Jami Floyd, senior editor for race & justice at WNYC, talk about affirmative action as an issue in the presidential race - where Joe Biden stands on it as the Trump administration sues Yale over its use of race in admissions. Plus, Chemerinsky weighs in on affirmative action in his state, California, where it is currently banned but is on the ballot for voters this year as Prop 16 asks whether it should be allowed again.

15 min5 d ago
Comments
Trump Goes Negative On Affirmative Action

Whose 'Law And Order' Is It Anyway?

The two candidates have different ideas of what law and order means. In terms of handling protests, police reform, white supremacy & white collar crime, where do Trump and Biden stand? On today's show, Inimai Chettiar, federal legislative and policy director for the Justice Action Network, and Jeffrey Butts, professor and director of the Research and Evaluation Center at CUNY John Jay College of Criminal Justice, discuss the Trump administration's "law and order" policies and rhetoric as they relate to the 2020 presidential election.

25 min1 w ago
Comments
Whose 'Law And Order' Is It Anyway?

How To Tell Voter Suppression From Standard Election Chaos

It's a pretty atypical election year, which means that things won't look like they usually do when you cast your ballot. But how can we spot voter suppression this pandemic election? On today's show, with voting underway around the country, Franita Tolson, law professor at USC specializing in election law, talks about some of the early challenges, from long lines to too few or unauthorized drop-boxes.

26 min1 w ago
Comments
How To Tell Voter Suppression From Standard Election Chaos

Meet Amy Coney Barrett, And Her Senate Questioners

With Election Day less than a month away, the Senate began hearings into Trump's nominee, Judge Amy Coney Barrett. On the line: Roe v. Wade, LGBTQ+ rights, the Affordable Care Act, and more. On today's show, Amanda Becker,Washington correspondent for The 19th,talks about the latest national political news, as Washington's eyes are trained on the Amy Coney Barrett hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

23 min1 w ago
Comments
Meet Amy Coney Barrett, And Her Senate Questioners

Defund, Divest, Abolish, Reform: Untangling The Many Ways to Fix Policing

There's no shortage of voices clamoring to be heard on the issue of policing. So what needs to be done? How much reform is the right amount? On today's show, Paul Butler, professor at Georgetown Law and the author of Chokehold: Policing Black Men (The New Press, 2017), andJami Floyd, senior editor for race and justice at WNYC, talk about how the candidates are addressing movements to defund, reform or support the police - and where their policies fall along that spectrum.

24 min1 w ago
Comments
Defund, Divest, Abolish, Reform: Untangling The Many Ways to Fix Policing

How To Honor Indigenous Peoples Day and Italian Heritage Too

In a pluralistic society, can we honor people from our history who some consider a hero, and others consider a genocidal monster? On today's show, The Mellon Foundation plans to re-imagine monuments over the next five years, to highlight underrepresented groups or stories and re-think current monuments and memorials. On the day many now celebrate as Indigenous Peoples' Day,Elizabeth Alexander — poet, educator, memoirist, scholar and president of The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation — talks about the group's plans and what they hope to achieve.

23 min1 w ago
Comments
How To Honor Indigenous Peoples Day and Italian Heritage Too

What's A Nobel Peace Prize Good For Anyway?

The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to a UN agency dedicated to ending world hunger. But is the award worth the hype? On today's show, Anne Applebaum, Atlantic staff writer, covering national politics and foreign policy, and the author of Twilight of Democracy: The Seductive Lure of Authoritarianism (Doubleday July, 2020) talks about this year's Nobel Peace Prize: the U.N.'s World Food Programme for its work fighting hunger during the worldwide pandemic -- and also why she's a skepticwhen it comes to the award's significance.

18 min2 w ago
Comments
What's A Nobel Peace Prize Good For Anyway?

First Steps, Big Steps and Next Steps for Criminal Justice Reform

Back in 2018, Congress passed the First Step Act, a criminal justice reform measure. So how big of a 'first step' was it, and what are the next steps toward fixing mass incarceration? On today's show, Ekow Yankah, professor of law at Cardozo Law School, discusses the First Step Act—a criminal justice bill aimed at reforming sentencing laws, reducing recidivismand decreasing the federal inmate population—and assesses the next steps proposed by the presidential candidates.

22 min2 w ago
Comments
First Steps, Big Steps and Next Steps for Criminal Justice Reform

Next Debate Craziness Starts Before We’ve Even Digested Last Night’s

Last night's VP debate was full of sparks and barbs. We take calls about that, plus, new uncertainty about whether the second presidential debate will even happen. On today's show, callers respond to the vice-presidential candidates' debate between current Vice President Mike Pence and Senator Kamala Harris,plus analysis from Tarini Parti, politics reporter at The Wall Street Journal. UPDATE: The negotiations have shifted from whether to have the second presidential debate on Oct. 22, or to postpone it until President Trump is no longer contagious.

21 min2 w ago
Comments
Next Debate Craziness Starts Before We’ve Even Digested Last Night’s

Latest Episodes

New Debate Rules, Old Republican Divides

New rules mean that at Thursday's presidential debate, there won't be as much interrupting as the first one. So what should we expect? On today's show, Susan Glasser, staff writer for The New Yorker, CNN global affairs analyst and co-author, with Peter Baker, of The Man Who Ran Washington: the Life and Times of Jim Baker III (Doubleday, 2020), talks about the latest national political news.

19 min4 d ago
Comments
New Debate Rules, Old Republican Divides

Trump Goes Negative On Affirmative Action

Trump's DOJ is fighting in court to end affirmative action in college admissions. So what's behind the argument that this policy meant to address racial bias is, in fact, racist? On today's show, Erwin Chemerinsky,professor and dean of Berkeley Law, and the author of several books, including We the People: A Progressive Reading of the Constitution for the Twenty-First Century (Picador Macmillan, 2018) and Jami Floyd, senior editor for race & justice at WNYC, talk about affirmative action as an issue in the presidential race - where Joe Biden stands on it as the Trump administration sues Yale over its use of race in admissions. Plus, Chemerinsky weighs in on affirmative action in his state, California, where it is currently banned but is on the ballot for voters this year as Prop 16 asks whether it should be allowed again.

15 min5 d ago
Comments
Trump Goes Negative On Affirmative Action

Whose 'Law And Order' Is It Anyway?

The two candidates have different ideas of what law and order means. In terms of handling protests, police reform, white supremacy & white collar crime, where do Trump and Biden stand? On today's show, Inimai Chettiar, federal legislative and policy director for the Justice Action Network, and Jeffrey Butts, professor and director of the Research and Evaluation Center at CUNY John Jay College of Criminal Justice, discuss the Trump administration's "law and order" policies and rhetoric as they relate to the 2020 presidential election.

25 min1 w ago
Comments
Whose 'Law And Order' Is It Anyway?

How To Tell Voter Suppression From Standard Election Chaos

It's a pretty atypical election year, which means that things won't look like they usually do when you cast your ballot. But how can we spot voter suppression this pandemic election? On today's show, with voting underway around the country, Franita Tolson, law professor at USC specializing in election law, talks about some of the early challenges, from long lines to too few or unauthorized drop-boxes.

26 min1 w ago
Comments
How To Tell Voter Suppression From Standard Election Chaos

Meet Amy Coney Barrett, And Her Senate Questioners

With Election Day less than a month away, the Senate began hearings into Trump's nominee, Judge Amy Coney Barrett. On the line: Roe v. Wade, LGBTQ+ rights, the Affordable Care Act, and more. On today's show, Amanda Becker,Washington correspondent for The 19th,talks about the latest national political news, as Washington's eyes are trained on the Amy Coney Barrett hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

23 min1 w ago
Comments
Meet Amy Coney Barrett, And Her Senate Questioners

Defund, Divest, Abolish, Reform: Untangling The Many Ways to Fix Policing

There's no shortage of voices clamoring to be heard on the issue of policing. So what needs to be done? How much reform is the right amount? On today's show, Paul Butler, professor at Georgetown Law and the author of Chokehold: Policing Black Men (The New Press, 2017), andJami Floyd, senior editor for race and justice at WNYC, talk about how the candidates are addressing movements to defund, reform or support the police - and where their policies fall along that spectrum.

24 min1 w ago
Comments
Defund, Divest, Abolish, Reform: Untangling The Many Ways to Fix Policing

How To Honor Indigenous Peoples Day and Italian Heritage Too

In a pluralistic society, can we honor people from our history who some consider a hero, and others consider a genocidal monster? On today's show, The Mellon Foundation plans to re-imagine monuments over the next five years, to highlight underrepresented groups or stories and re-think current monuments and memorials. On the day many now celebrate as Indigenous Peoples' Day,Elizabeth Alexander — poet, educator, memoirist, scholar and president of The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation — talks about the group's plans and what they hope to achieve.

23 min1 w ago
Comments
How To Honor Indigenous Peoples Day and Italian Heritage Too

What's A Nobel Peace Prize Good For Anyway?

The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to a UN agency dedicated to ending world hunger. But is the award worth the hype? On today's show, Anne Applebaum, Atlantic staff writer, covering national politics and foreign policy, and the author of Twilight of Democracy: The Seductive Lure of Authoritarianism (Doubleday July, 2020) talks about this year's Nobel Peace Prize: the U.N.'s World Food Programme for its work fighting hunger during the worldwide pandemic -- and also why she's a skepticwhen it comes to the award's significance.

18 min2 w ago
Comments
What's A Nobel Peace Prize Good For Anyway?

First Steps, Big Steps and Next Steps for Criminal Justice Reform

Back in 2018, Congress passed the First Step Act, a criminal justice reform measure. So how big of a 'first step' was it, and what are the next steps toward fixing mass incarceration? On today's show, Ekow Yankah, professor of law at Cardozo Law School, discusses the First Step Act—a criminal justice bill aimed at reforming sentencing laws, reducing recidivismand decreasing the federal inmate population—and assesses the next steps proposed by the presidential candidates.

22 min2 w ago
Comments
First Steps, Big Steps and Next Steps for Criminal Justice Reform

Next Debate Craziness Starts Before We’ve Even Digested Last Night’s

Last night's VP debate was full of sparks and barbs. We take calls about that, plus, new uncertainty about whether the second presidential debate will even happen. On today's show, callers respond to the vice-presidential candidates' debate between current Vice President Mike Pence and Senator Kamala Harris,plus analysis from Tarini Parti, politics reporter at The Wall Street Journal. UPDATE: The negotiations have shifted from whether to have the second presidential debate on Oct. 22, or to postpone it until President Trump is no longer contagious.

21 min2 w ago
Comments
Next Debate Craziness Starts Before We’ve Even Digested Last Night’s
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