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Radiolab

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Radiolab

Radiolab

WNYC Studios

6.7K
Followers
32.8K
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

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Radiolab

Latest Episodes

Insomnia Line

Coronasomnia is a not-so-surprising side-effect of the global pandemic. More and more of us are having trouble falling asleep. We wanted to find a way to get inside that nighttime world, to see why people are awake and what they are thinking about. So what’d Radiolab decide to do? Open up the phone lines and talk to you. We created an insomnia hotline and on this week’s experimental episode, we stayed up all night, taking hundreds of calls, spilling secrets, and at long last, watching the sunrise peek through. This episode was produced byLulu Miller with Rachael Cusick, Tracie Hunte, Tobin Low, Sarah Qari, Molly Webster, Pat Walters, Shima Oliaee, and Jonny Moens. Want more Radiolab in your life?Sign up for our newsletter!We share our latest favorites: articles, tv shows,funnyYoutube videos, chocolate chip cookie recipes, and more. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today atRadiolab.org/donate.

34 min6 d ago
Comments
Insomnia Line

More Perfect: Sex Appeal

We lost a legend. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died on September 18th, 2020. She was 87. In honor of her passing we arere-airing the More Perfect episode dedicated to one of her cases, because itoffers a unique portrait of how one person can make change in the world. This isthestory of how Ginsburg, as a younglawyer at the ACLU, convinced an all-male Supreme Court to take discrimination against women seriously - using a caseon discrimination against men. This episode was reported by Julia Longoria. Special thanks to Stephen Wiesenfeld, Alison Keith, and Bob Darcy. Supreme Court archival audio comes fromOyez, a free law project in collaboration with the Legal Information Institute at Cornell. Support Radiolab today atRadiolab.org/donate.

53 min1 w ago
Comments
More Perfect: Sex Appeal

Falling

There are so many ways to fall—in love, asleep, even flat on your face. This hour, Radiolab dives into stories of great falls. We jump into a black hole, take a trip over Niagara Falls, upend some myths about falling cats, and plunge into our favorite songs about falling. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today atRadiolab.org/donate.

56 min2 w ago
Comments
Falling

Bringing Gamma Back, Again

Today, we return to the lab of neuroscientist Li-Huei Tsai, which brought us one of our favorite stories from four years ago - about the power of flashing lights on an Alzheimer’s-addled (mouse) brain. In this update, Li-Huei tells us about her team’s latest research, which now includes flashing sound, and ways in which light and sound together might retrieve lost memories.This new science is not a cure, and is far from a treatment, but it’s a finding so … simple, you won’t be able to shake it. Come join us for a lab visit, where we’ll meet some mice, stare at some light, and come face-to-face with the mystery of memory. We can promise you: by the end, you’ll never think the same way about Christmas lights again. Or jingle bells. Thisupdatewas reported by Molly Webster, andproduced by Rachael Cusick.The originalepisode was produced by Annie McEwen, Matt Kielty, and Molly Webster, with help from Simon Adler. Special thanks to Ed Boyden, Cognito Therapeutics, Brad Dickerson, Ka...

26 min2 w ago
Comments
Bringing Gamma Back, Again

Fungus Amungus

Six years ago, a new infection began popping up in four different hospitals on three different continents, all around the same time. It wasn’t a bacteria, or a virus. It was ... a killer fungus. No one knew where it came from, or why. Today, the story of an ancient showdown between fungus and mammals that started when dinosaurs disappeared from the earth. Back then, the battle swung in our favor (spoiler alert!) and we’ve been hanging onto that win ever since. But one scientist suggests that the rise of this new infectious fungus indicates our edge is slipping, degree by increasing degree. This episode was reported by Molly Webster, and produced by Molly and Bethel Habte, with production help from Tad Davis. Special thanks to Julie Parsonnet and Aviv Bergman. Support Radiolab today atRadiolab.org/donate. Further Fungus Reading: NYTimes feature on the mysterious rise of Candida auris. Arturo's paper: “On the emergence of Candida auris, Climate Change, Azoles, Swamps, and Birds”, ...

31 min3 w ago
Comments
Fungus Amungus

Translation

How close can words get you to the truthand feel and force of life? That's the question poking at our ribs this hour, as we wonder how it is that the right words can have the wrong meanings, and why sometimes the best translations lead us to an understanding that's way deeper than language. This episode,a bunch of stories that play out in the middle space between one reality and another — where poetry, insult comedy, 911 calls, and even our own bodies work to closethe gap. Support Radiolab today atRadiolab.org/donate. Special thanks for the music ofBrian Carpenter's Ghost Train Orchestra

75 minAUG 28
Comments
Translation

Lebanon, USA

This is a story of a road trip. After a particularly traumatic Valentine's Day, Fadi Boukaram was surfing google maps and noticed that there was a town called Lebanon... in Oregon. Being Lebanese himself, he wondered, how many Lebanons exist in the US? The answer: 47. Thus began his journeyto visit them all and find an America he'd never expected, and the homeland he'd been searching for all along. Thisepisodewas made in collaboration with Kerning Cultures, a podcast that tells stories from the Middle East and North Africa.The original "Lebanon USA" story was reported by Alex Atack with editorial support from Bella Ibrahim, Dana Ballout, Zeina Dowidar, and Hebah Fisher. Original sound design by Alex Atack. Editor'sNote: Inan earlierversion of this episode, we inaccurately described a grain elevator. We have updated the audio to reflect the correction. The new update of the story was produced and reported by Shima Oliaee. We had original music by Thomas Koner and Jad Atoui. Be sure t...

42 minAUG 21
Comments
Lebanon, USA

The Wubi Effect

When we think of China today, we think of a technological superpower. FromHuawei and 5G to TikTok and viral social media, China is stride for stride with the United States in the world of computing. However, China’s technological renaissance almost didn’t happen. And for one very basic reason: The Chinese language, with its 70,000 plus characters, couldn’t fit on a keyboard. Today, we tell the story of Professor Wang Yongmin, a hard headed computer programmer who solved this puzzle and laid the foundation for the China we know today. This episode was reported and produced by Simon Adler with reporting assistance from Yang Yang. Special thanks to Martin Howard. You can view his renowned collection of typewriters at: antiquetypewriters.com Support Radiolab today atRadiolab.org/donate.

55 minAUG 14
Comments
The Wubi Effect

Uncounted

First things first: our very own Latif Nasser has an exciting new show on Netflix. He talks to Jad about the hidden forces of the world that connect us all. Then, with an eye on the upcoming election, we take a look back: at two pieces from More Perfect Season 3 about Constitutional amendments that determine who gets to vote. Former Radiolab producer Julia Longoria takes us to Washington, D.C. The capital is at the heart of our democracy, but it’s not a state, and it wasn’t until the 23rd Amendment that its people got the right to vote for president. But that still left DC without full representation in Congress; D.C. sends a "non-voting delegate" to the House. Julia profiles that delegate, Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton, and her unique approach to fighting for power in a virtually powerless role. Second, Radiolab producer Sarah Qari looks at a current fight to lower the US voting age to 16 that harkens back to the fight for the 26th Amendment in the 1960s. Eighteen-year-olds...

50 minAUG 7
Comments
Uncounted

Invisible Allies

As scientists have been scrambling to find new and better ways to treatcovid-19, they’ve come across some unexpected allies. Invisible and primordial, these protectors have been with us all along. And they just might help us to better weather this viral storm. To kick things off, we travel through time from a homeless shelter to a military hospital, pondering the pandemic-fighting power of the sun. And then, we dive deep into the periodic table to look at how a simple element might actually be a microbe’s biggest foe. This episode was reported by Simon Adler and Molly Webster, and produced by Annie McEwen, Pat Walters, Simon Adler, and Molly Webster, with production help from Tad Davis. Support Radiolab today atRadiolab.org/donate.

41 minJUL 31
Comments
Invisible Allies

Latest Episodes

Insomnia Line

Coronasomnia is a not-so-surprising side-effect of the global pandemic. More and more of us are having trouble falling asleep. We wanted to find a way to get inside that nighttime world, to see why people are awake and what they are thinking about. So what’d Radiolab decide to do? Open up the phone lines and talk to you. We created an insomnia hotline and on this week’s experimental episode, we stayed up all night, taking hundreds of calls, spilling secrets, and at long last, watching the sunrise peek through. This episode was produced byLulu Miller with Rachael Cusick, Tracie Hunte, Tobin Low, Sarah Qari, Molly Webster, Pat Walters, Shima Oliaee, and Jonny Moens. Want more Radiolab in your life?Sign up for our newsletter!We share our latest favorites: articles, tv shows,funnyYoutube videos, chocolate chip cookie recipes, and more. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today atRadiolab.org/donate.

34 min6 d ago
Comments
Insomnia Line

More Perfect: Sex Appeal

We lost a legend. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died on September 18th, 2020. She was 87. In honor of her passing we arere-airing the More Perfect episode dedicated to one of her cases, because itoffers a unique portrait of how one person can make change in the world. This isthestory of how Ginsburg, as a younglawyer at the ACLU, convinced an all-male Supreme Court to take discrimination against women seriously - using a caseon discrimination against men. This episode was reported by Julia Longoria. Special thanks to Stephen Wiesenfeld, Alison Keith, and Bob Darcy. Supreme Court archival audio comes fromOyez, a free law project in collaboration with the Legal Information Institute at Cornell. Support Radiolab today atRadiolab.org/donate.

53 min1 w ago
Comments
More Perfect: Sex Appeal

Falling

There are so many ways to fall—in love, asleep, even flat on your face. This hour, Radiolab dives into stories of great falls. We jump into a black hole, take a trip over Niagara Falls, upend some myths about falling cats, and plunge into our favorite songs about falling. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today atRadiolab.org/donate.

56 min2 w ago
Comments
Falling

Bringing Gamma Back, Again

Today, we return to the lab of neuroscientist Li-Huei Tsai, which brought us one of our favorite stories from four years ago - about the power of flashing lights on an Alzheimer’s-addled (mouse) brain. In this update, Li-Huei tells us about her team’s latest research, which now includes flashing sound, and ways in which light and sound together might retrieve lost memories.This new science is not a cure, and is far from a treatment, but it’s a finding so … simple, you won’t be able to shake it. Come join us for a lab visit, where we’ll meet some mice, stare at some light, and come face-to-face with the mystery of memory. We can promise you: by the end, you’ll never think the same way about Christmas lights again. Or jingle bells. Thisupdatewas reported by Molly Webster, andproduced by Rachael Cusick.The originalepisode was produced by Annie McEwen, Matt Kielty, and Molly Webster, with help from Simon Adler. Special thanks to Ed Boyden, Cognito Therapeutics, Brad Dickerson, Ka...

26 min2 w ago
Comments
Bringing Gamma Back, Again

Fungus Amungus

Six years ago, a new infection began popping up in four different hospitals on three different continents, all around the same time. It wasn’t a bacteria, or a virus. It was ... a killer fungus. No one knew where it came from, or why. Today, the story of an ancient showdown between fungus and mammals that started when dinosaurs disappeared from the earth. Back then, the battle swung in our favor (spoiler alert!) and we’ve been hanging onto that win ever since. But one scientist suggests that the rise of this new infectious fungus indicates our edge is slipping, degree by increasing degree. This episode was reported by Molly Webster, and produced by Molly and Bethel Habte, with production help from Tad Davis. Special thanks to Julie Parsonnet and Aviv Bergman. Support Radiolab today atRadiolab.org/donate. Further Fungus Reading: NYTimes feature on the mysterious rise of Candida auris. Arturo's paper: “On the emergence of Candida auris, Climate Change, Azoles, Swamps, and Birds”, ...

31 min3 w ago
Comments
Fungus Amungus

Translation

How close can words get you to the truthand feel and force of life? That's the question poking at our ribs this hour, as we wonder how it is that the right words can have the wrong meanings, and why sometimes the best translations lead us to an understanding that's way deeper than language. This episode,a bunch of stories that play out in the middle space between one reality and another — where poetry, insult comedy, 911 calls, and even our own bodies work to closethe gap. Support Radiolab today atRadiolab.org/donate. Special thanks for the music ofBrian Carpenter's Ghost Train Orchestra

75 minAUG 28
Comments
Translation

Lebanon, USA

This is a story of a road trip. After a particularly traumatic Valentine's Day, Fadi Boukaram was surfing google maps and noticed that there was a town called Lebanon... in Oregon. Being Lebanese himself, he wondered, how many Lebanons exist in the US? The answer: 47. Thus began his journeyto visit them all and find an America he'd never expected, and the homeland he'd been searching for all along. Thisepisodewas made in collaboration with Kerning Cultures, a podcast that tells stories from the Middle East and North Africa.The original "Lebanon USA" story was reported by Alex Atack with editorial support from Bella Ibrahim, Dana Ballout, Zeina Dowidar, and Hebah Fisher. Original sound design by Alex Atack. Editor'sNote: Inan earlierversion of this episode, we inaccurately described a grain elevator. We have updated the audio to reflect the correction. The new update of the story was produced and reported by Shima Oliaee. We had original music by Thomas Koner and Jad Atoui. Be sure t...

42 minAUG 21
Comments
Lebanon, USA

The Wubi Effect

When we think of China today, we think of a technological superpower. FromHuawei and 5G to TikTok and viral social media, China is stride for stride with the United States in the world of computing. However, China’s technological renaissance almost didn’t happen. And for one very basic reason: The Chinese language, with its 70,000 plus characters, couldn’t fit on a keyboard. Today, we tell the story of Professor Wang Yongmin, a hard headed computer programmer who solved this puzzle and laid the foundation for the China we know today. This episode was reported and produced by Simon Adler with reporting assistance from Yang Yang. Special thanks to Martin Howard. You can view his renowned collection of typewriters at: antiquetypewriters.com Support Radiolab today atRadiolab.org/donate.

55 minAUG 14
Comments
The Wubi Effect

Uncounted

First things first: our very own Latif Nasser has an exciting new show on Netflix. He talks to Jad about the hidden forces of the world that connect us all. Then, with an eye on the upcoming election, we take a look back: at two pieces from More Perfect Season 3 about Constitutional amendments that determine who gets to vote. Former Radiolab producer Julia Longoria takes us to Washington, D.C. The capital is at the heart of our democracy, but it’s not a state, and it wasn’t until the 23rd Amendment that its people got the right to vote for president. But that still left DC without full representation in Congress; D.C. sends a "non-voting delegate" to the House. Julia profiles that delegate, Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton, and her unique approach to fighting for power in a virtually powerless role. Second, Radiolab producer Sarah Qari looks at a current fight to lower the US voting age to 16 that harkens back to the fight for the 26th Amendment in the 1960s. Eighteen-year-olds...

50 minAUG 7
Comments
Uncounted

Invisible Allies

As scientists have been scrambling to find new and better ways to treatcovid-19, they’ve come across some unexpected allies. Invisible and primordial, these protectors have been with us all along. And they just might help us to better weather this viral storm. To kick things off, we travel through time from a homeless shelter to a military hospital, pondering the pandemic-fighting power of the sun. And then, we dive deep into the periodic table to look at how a simple element might actually be a microbe’s biggest foe. This episode was reported by Simon Adler and Molly Webster, and produced by Annie McEwen, Pat Walters, Simon Adler, and Molly Webster, with production help from Tad Davis. Support Radiolab today atRadiolab.org/donate.

41 minJUL 31
Comments
Invisible Allies
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