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Resettled

VPM

4
Followers
23
Plays
Resettled

Resettled

VPM

4
Followers
23
Plays
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About Us

In this six-part podcast series, we showcase stories of refugees as they adjust to their new lives in Virginia. These personal stories are woven together with useful teaching moments about the resettlement process. Season one will consist of six thematic episodes, which aim to bring the listener into the daily lives of refugees through field interviews (at home, work and school), personally-recorded audio diaries and reflective studio interviews.Hosted by Ahmed Badr, a writer, social entrepreneur, poet, and former Iraqi refugee working at the intersection of creativity, displacement, and youth empowerment. On July 25th, 2006, Ahmed's home in Baghdad was bombed by militia troops. He and his family relocated to Syria as refugees before receiving approval to move to the United States. Ahmed is the founder of Narratio, a platform for youth empowerment publishing artwork from around the globe. In the last three years, these storytelling initiatives have reached over 20 million people across the world. In September of 2018, Ahmed was selected as one of 17 UN Young Leaders by the Secretary General’s Envoy on Youth.Visit vpm.org/resettled for more information and additional content.

Latest Episodes

Resettled: Official Trailer

Coming July 3. In this six-part series, we showcase stories of refugees as they adjust to their new lives in Virginia. From navigating the healthcare system to graduating from high school, we share in the intimate moments of refugees' lives and explore the policies shaping their futures. Each episode explores a specific theme in their journeys upon arrival to Virginia. We hear about what it’s like to: perform on stage in a non-native language, overcome past trauma in a new country, and budget for a family with no credit history or transferrable degree. These personal stories are woven together with useful teaching moments about the resettlement process.

2 minJUN 15
Comments
Resettled: Official Trailer

Sneak Preview: Education

Resettled is a new podcast from VPM that explores the process of refugee resettlement in Virginia through the voices of those directly experiencing it. This preview contains an excerpt from our upcoming episode about education. It focuses on the thriving community of refugees, asylees and immigrants living in Harrisonburg, Virginia, as well as the measures local schools like Harrisonburg High School have taken to ensure success for its resettled students. Resettled launches on July 3. Visit vpm.org/resettled for more information about this series, as well as stories from refugees in our community.

7 minJUN 20
Comments
Sneak Preview: Education

Arrival

We follow the LahPai family through the first 90 days of their resettlement in Richmond, Virginia. Though their arrival was highly anticipated and their IRC staff member worked tirelessly to provide them with a strong foundation, the LahPai family arrived just in time for Thanksgiving...only for their heat to break. We pair their story with reflections on our host’s own experience and discover how these moments can shape refugees’ understandings of America. We also establish the need for creative problem-solving around other themes that the series will unpack: health, education, jobs, and culture.

32 minJUL 3
Comments
Arrival

Education

Not a lot of teens are excited about being the “different” kid that stands out in high school. As a Muslim teen from Iraq, Fatimah is learning to navigate that typical experience: striking the balance between fitting in and being your own person. In her senior year at Harrisonburg High School, Fatimah decided to try out for the school play, which pushed her boundaries around sexuality and acceptance. Harrisonburg, Virginia is unique as well: there more than 50 languages and countries represented in Harrisonburg’s public schools. Not every refugee teen experience is a positive one, but the overwhelming support and pride that the Harrisonburg community takes in its immigrants and refugees means that leaders prioritize their needs in a way that the federal government often doesn't.

41 minJUL 3
Comments
Education

Health

While refugees are subjected to medical tests and scrutiny during their resettlement process, issues of mental health can last for decades or, left untreated, for lifetimes. In his early 20s, Ahmed Alsrya worked at a car wash to help support his family. He was glad to have a job, but felt like his life wasn’t going anywhere. For a while, Ahmed’s daily English was summed up in two words: “windows and wheels.” Eventually, his rut became a depression, spurred by tough memories of being a refugee - like the time his Palestinian refugee camp caught fire; or the time his mother was shot; or losing friends to the war in Iraq. Today, Ahmed is out of his rut and jokingly refers to himself as a trauma specialist. In Charlottesville, he joined a group of concerned refugees who want to help their communities heal. Through special training, he is now helping peers break down the stigma of mental health and face their traumas together. He’s also come full circle from that experience in the refugee camp and volunteers as a firefighter.

28 minJUL 3
Comments
Health

Jobs

When Bhutan established a "one nation, one people" policy in the 1980s, Dadi Neopaney and his family had to flee or lose their way of life. Dadi grew up as a stateless refugee in camps before he and his wife and son were able to resettle in Richmond, Virginia. Dadi had been a teacher and a journalist before resettling, but all that experience counted for nothing when he arrived in the United States. He had to restart his career from scratch, wearing a costume and waving a sign on the side of the road. After working his way up through a variety of jobs, Dadi now had a Master's degree in social work and works as a hospital care manager, has earned his citizenship and remains hopeful of a day when he can legally return to his home country.

32 minJUL 10
Comments
Jobs

Culture

When you’re so busy adopting new ways of life, it might not seem like there’s any room for your traditions.So how do you carry your culture with you to a brand new place -- and keep it intact? For Chef Noori, the creative process of Afghan cooking and writing poetry is one that he embraces both inside and outside his home. It's not just a lifestyle for Noori, it's his livelihood as well. His literal test kitchen for his American dream? It’s called The Mantu.

27 minJUL 17
Comments
Culture

Resettled?

Do you ever truly feel resettled? What exactly does that mean, and how do you get there? For Mrs. Lailuma, a recent widow with children, arriving in Charlottesville, Virginia meant adapting not only to a new country, but also to a new family dynamic. The moment she felt like she'd be able to make it in America? Getting her driver's license. We also caught back up with the refugees featured earlier in the series, as we originally spoke with them as far back as 2018, to hear where they stand on the question of resettlement. Ahmed and Angela also reflect on the current state of immigration and refugee resettlement in the United States, driving home the importance of changing the perception of people arriving from other countries.

29 minJUL 24
Comments
Resettled?

Bonus: Language

One of the most common challenges refugees face is not speaking the language of their new country. You heard hints of this in some of the stories we told in Resettled: One of the first things that resettlement agencies in the U.S. recommend is taking English classes. We want to share a story about language from another podcast we think you’ll like, called Neighbors. The show is a deep dive into the stories of ordinary people that reflect our common humanity. This particular episode, "The Language Learner," follows the story of a man who resettled with his family in Nashville, Tennessee after being forced from his home country of Myanmar—formerly known as Burma. This story was produced by Jakob Lewis in conjunction with Nashville Public Radio. Production assistance from Bailey Robbins. Edited by Emily Siner and Mack Linebaugh. Music by Podington Bear. To hear more stories from Neighbors, search in your favorite podcast app or go to www.neighborspodcast.com.

17 minJUL 31
Comments
Bonus: Language
the END

Latest Episodes

Resettled: Official Trailer

Coming July 3. In this six-part series, we showcase stories of refugees as they adjust to their new lives in Virginia. From navigating the healthcare system to graduating from high school, we share in the intimate moments of refugees' lives and explore the policies shaping their futures. Each episode explores a specific theme in their journeys upon arrival to Virginia. We hear about what it’s like to: perform on stage in a non-native language, overcome past trauma in a new country, and budget for a family with no credit history or transferrable degree. These personal stories are woven together with useful teaching moments about the resettlement process.

2 minJUN 15
Comments
Resettled: Official Trailer

Sneak Preview: Education

Resettled is a new podcast from VPM that explores the process of refugee resettlement in Virginia through the voices of those directly experiencing it. This preview contains an excerpt from our upcoming episode about education. It focuses on the thriving community of refugees, asylees and immigrants living in Harrisonburg, Virginia, as well as the measures local schools like Harrisonburg High School have taken to ensure success for its resettled students. Resettled launches on July 3. Visit vpm.org/resettled for more information about this series, as well as stories from refugees in our community.

7 minJUN 20
Comments
Sneak Preview: Education

Arrival

We follow the LahPai family through the first 90 days of their resettlement in Richmond, Virginia. Though their arrival was highly anticipated and their IRC staff member worked tirelessly to provide them with a strong foundation, the LahPai family arrived just in time for Thanksgiving...only for their heat to break. We pair their story with reflections on our host’s own experience and discover how these moments can shape refugees’ understandings of America. We also establish the need for creative problem-solving around other themes that the series will unpack: health, education, jobs, and culture.

32 minJUL 3
Comments
Arrival

Education

Not a lot of teens are excited about being the “different” kid that stands out in high school. As a Muslim teen from Iraq, Fatimah is learning to navigate that typical experience: striking the balance between fitting in and being your own person. In her senior year at Harrisonburg High School, Fatimah decided to try out for the school play, which pushed her boundaries around sexuality and acceptance. Harrisonburg, Virginia is unique as well: there more than 50 languages and countries represented in Harrisonburg’s public schools. Not every refugee teen experience is a positive one, but the overwhelming support and pride that the Harrisonburg community takes in its immigrants and refugees means that leaders prioritize their needs in a way that the federal government often doesn't.

41 minJUL 3
Comments
Education

Health

While refugees are subjected to medical tests and scrutiny during their resettlement process, issues of mental health can last for decades or, left untreated, for lifetimes. In his early 20s, Ahmed Alsrya worked at a car wash to help support his family. He was glad to have a job, but felt like his life wasn’t going anywhere. For a while, Ahmed’s daily English was summed up in two words: “windows and wheels.” Eventually, his rut became a depression, spurred by tough memories of being a refugee - like the time his Palestinian refugee camp caught fire; or the time his mother was shot; or losing friends to the war in Iraq. Today, Ahmed is out of his rut and jokingly refers to himself as a trauma specialist. In Charlottesville, he joined a group of concerned refugees who want to help their communities heal. Through special training, he is now helping peers break down the stigma of mental health and face their traumas together. He’s also come full circle from that experience in the refugee camp and volunteers as a firefighter.

28 minJUL 3
Comments
Health

Jobs

When Bhutan established a "one nation, one people" policy in the 1980s, Dadi Neopaney and his family had to flee or lose their way of life. Dadi grew up as a stateless refugee in camps before he and his wife and son were able to resettle in Richmond, Virginia. Dadi had been a teacher and a journalist before resettling, but all that experience counted for nothing when he arrived in the United States. He had to restart his career from scratch, wearing a costume and waving a sign on the side of the road. After working his way up through a variety of jobs, Dadi now had a Master's degree in social work and works as a hospital care manager, has earned his citizenship and remains hopeful of a day when he can legally return to his home country.

32 minJUL 10
Comments
Jobs

Culture

When you’re so busy adopting new ways of life, it might not seem like there’s any room for your traditions.So how do you carry your culture with you to a brand new place -- and keep it intact? For Chef Noori, the creative process of Afghan cooking and writing poetry is one that he embraces both inside and outside his home. It's not just a lifestyle for Noori, it's his livelihood as well. His literal test kitchen for his American dream? It’s called The Mantu.

27 minJUL 17
Comments
Culture

Resettled?

Do you ever truly feel resettled? What exactly does that mean, and how do you get there? For Mrs. Lailuma, a recent widow with children, arriving in Charlottesville, Virginia meant adapting not only to a new country, but also to a new family dynamic. The moment she felt like she'd be able to make it in America? Getting her driver's license. We also caught back up with the refugees featured earlier in the series, as we originally spoke with them as far back as 2018, to hear where they stand on the question of resettlement. Ahmed and Angela also reflect on the current state of immigration and refugee resettlement in the United States, driving home the importance of changing the perception of people arriving from other countries.

29 minJUL 24
Comments
Resettled?

Bonus: Language

One of the most common challenges refugees face is not speaking the language of their new country. You heard hints of this in some of the stories we told in Resettled: One of the first things that resettlement agencies in the U.S. recommend is taking English classes. We want to share a story about language from another podcast we think you’ll like, called Neighbors. The show is a deep dive into the stories of ordinary people that reflect our common humanity. This particular episode, "The Language Learner," follows the story of a man who resettled with his family in Nashville, Tennessee after being forced from his home country of Myanmar—formerly known as Burma. This story was produced by Jakob Lewis in conjunction with Nashville Public Radio. Production assistance from Bailey Robbins. Edited by Emily Siner and Mack Linebaugh. Music by Podington Bear. To hear more stories from Neighbors, search in your favorite podcast app or go to www.neighborspodcast.com.

17 minJUL 31
Comments
Bonus: Language
the END
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