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Berkeley Talks

UC Berkeley

8
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24
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Berkeley Talks

Berkeley Talks

UC Berkeley

8
Followers
24
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

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About Us

A Berkeley News podcast that features lectures and conversations at UC Berkeley


See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Latest Episodes

U.S. elections 2020 and implications for the Americas

In this episode ofBerkeley Talks, experts discuss the forces that shaped the outcome of the U.S. elections in November and the implications of the elections for the U.S. and the countries of Latin America."Hispanics are the new swing voters," said Maria Escheveste, a senior scholar at the Center for Latin American Studies (CLAS) and president and CEO of the Opportunity Institute, who joined Paul Pierson, a professor of political science at Berkeley, and Colombian investigative journalist Daniel Coronell, at the Nov. 20, 2020 campus webinar.It's imperative that Democrats realize that the Latinx community isn't a monolith, she said, and that immigration isn't the only issue every Latinx person cares about. "We are so diverse because we're generationally diverse — linguistically, racially, ethnically," said Escheveste. "Demography is not destiny."Listen to the discussion and read a transcript on Berkeley News. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

80 min1 d ago
Comments
U.S. elections 2020 and implications for the Americas

Threats to abortion rights and how people are resisting

In this episode of Berkeley Talks, a panel of scholars — Berkeley Law professor Khiara Bridges; Carol Joffe, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at UC San Francisco; and Jill Adams, co-founder and executive director of the Center on Reproductive Rights and Justice at Berkeley Law — discuss how race, class and reproductive rights intersect and how people are choosing and resorting to self-directed and community-directed care to circumnavigate the structural inequalities in health care access.Listen to the episode and read a transcript on Berkeley News. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

83 min1 w ago
Comments
Threats to abortion rights and how people are resisting

How Native women challenged a 1900s Bay Area assimilation program

This episode of Berkeley Talks isa 2019 interview on KALX's The Graduates with Katie Keliiaa, a graduate student in UC Berkeley's Department of Ethnic Studies. In this interview, Keliiaa discusses her research on the Bay Area Outing Program, an early 20th century assimilation program that took Native American women out of their tribal lands and brought them to the Bay Area to perform domestic work.Listen to the episode and read the transcript on Berkeley News. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

32 minNOV 8
Comments
How Native women challenged a 1900s Bay Area assimilation program

How Mary Shelley's 'Frankenstein' took on a life of its own

In this special Halloween-inspired episode of Berkeley Talks, UC Berkeley Chancellor Carol Christ joins Manual Cinema's co-artistic director Drew Dir to discuss the collective's presentation of Frankenstein, a Cal Performances co-commission, in a talk moderated by Cal Performances' executive and artistic director Jeremy Geffen.Listen to the talk and read a transcript on Berkeley News. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

23 minOCT 28
Comments
How Mary Shelley's 'Frankenstein' took on a life of its own

The violent underworlds of El Salvador and their ties to the U.S.

In this Berkeley Talks episode, Salvadoran American journalist and activist Roberto Lovato, discusses his new book Unforgetting: A Memoir of Family, Migration, Gangs, and Revolution in the Americas,with Jess Alvarenga, an investigative reporter and documentary filmmaker and a graduate of UC Berkeley's Graduate School of Journalism.In Unforgetting, Lovato exposes how the U.S.-backed military dictatorship was responsible for killing 85% of the 75,000 to 80,000 people killed during the Salvadoran Civil War that was fought from 1979 to 1992."The book is ... a journey through different underworlds — the underworlds of the guerillas, the underworlds of the gangs, the underworlds of our family histories and secrets, the underworld of the secrets of nations, the things that countries don't like for us to know, I mean, which is theoretically how you get a president like Donald Trump, for example," said Lovato.Listen and read the transcript on Berkeley News. See acast.com/privacy for privacy...

76 minOCT 24
Comments
The violent underworlds of El Salvador and their ties to the U.S.

Portraits of power: Women of the 116th Congress

"I would say the loudest, boldest, most powerful voices coming out of Washington have been the voices of women," said U.S. Rep. Lauren Underwood (IL-14). "The way that we, collectively, have reframed the conversation about where this country is going has really, I think, been jarring for some of those who have been the power class in Washington for decades."Underwood was part of a panel that discussed the history-making women of the 116th Congress, and a recently published New York Times book that features powerful portraits of all but one Congresswoman. Also part of the conversation was Rep. Jackie Speier (CA-14), UC Berkeley Ph.D. candidate in political science and photojournalist Elizabeth Herman and New York Times photo editor Marisa Schwartz Taylor.Listen to the discussion and read a transcript on Berkeley News. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

60 minOCT 9
Comments
Portraits of power: Women of the 116th Congress

Berkeley scholars on the legal legacy of Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Following the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Sept. 18, 2020, Berkeley Law professors — Amanda Tyler, Catherine Fisk, Orin Kerr, Bertrall Ross and Dean Erwin Chemerinsky — came together to discuss Ginsburg's legacy, what will be the likely effects of her no longer being in the Supreme Court and what is likely to happen in the nomination and confirmation process of a new justice."Her legacy as an advocate completely changed the face of American society," said Tyler, who clerked for Ginsburg in 1999. "As an advocate, she opened the eyes of the Supreme Court to the lived experiences of both men and women who are held back by gender stereotypes. Because of that, she was able to convince them, to educate them, to teach them as to how gender stereotypes do that, not just to women but to men as well, and how putting women on a pedestal, as Justice Brennan said, and Justice Ginsburg loved this quote, is actually putting them in a cage. It's holding them back."Read a transcript and...

67 minSEP 28
Comments
Berkeley scholars on the legal legacy of Ruth Bader Ginsburg

How plantation museum tours distort the reality of slavery

In this Berkeley Talks episode, Stephen Small, a professor in UC Berkeley's Department of African American Studies, and interim director for the Institute for the Study of Societal Issues, discusses research from his upcoming book, tentatively titled Inside the Shadows of the Big House: 21st Century Antebellum Slave Cabins and Heritage Tourism in Louisiana.Since the 1990s, Small has visited more than 200 plantation museum sites in 10 states. Tours of these sites included narratives that privileged white elites and consistently avoided mention of slavery and the experience of enslaved people, says Small."Slavery is typically described in passive, general and abstract ways," said Small. "If mentioned at all, Black people typically appear as an undifferentiated stereotypical mass, with few exceptions."Listen to the episode and read the transcript on Berkeley News. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

60 minSEP 25
Comments
How plantation museum tours distort the reality of slavery

How to use sleep and circadian science to get better rest

As the global pandemic stretches on and massive wildfires rage along the West Coast, many people are finding it hard — if not impossible — to get the restful sleep they need. But Allison Harvey, a professor of clinical psychology and director of the Golden Bear Sleep and Mood Research Clinic at UC Berkeley, says although anxiety can make it more difficult to sleep well, there are evidence-based treatments that can help."I think as humans, at this point, we either have too many people in our lives and in our faces, or we're lonely and we're maybe feeling that as we go off to sleep," said Harvey, of life during the pandemic. "We need to go to safe burrows and nests in order to sleep. So, things that are comforting really make a difference to us."On Aug. 7, Harvey gave a talk, sponsored by the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI), about how changing certain behaviors — when and how we wake up and go to bed, for instance — can allow us to experience the sleep rhythms we naturall...

59 minSEP 11
Comments
How to use sleep and circadian science to get better rest

Why the 1960s song 'Little Boxes' still strikes a chord today

"Little boxes on the hillside. Little boxes made of ticky tacky. Little boxes on the hillside. Little boxes all the same. There’s a pink one, and a green one, and a blue one and a yellow one. And they're all made out of ticky tacky and they all look just the same.And the people in the houses all went to the university, where they were put in boxes and they came out all the same. And there's doctors and lawyers and business executives, and they're all made out of ticky tacky and they all look just the same."That's the first part of the song "Little Boxes," written by Berkeley alumna and political activist Malvina Reynolds in 1962. In the first episode of a new campus podcast — the Berkeley Podcast for Music — professor Nicholas Mathew talks with Reynolds' daughter, Nancy Schimmel, as well as Berkeley professors Margaret Crawford from architecture, Timothy Hampton from French and comparative literature and Maria Sonevytsky from music. They discuss Reynolds' life, music, activism an...

47 minAUG 28
Comments
Why the 1960s song 'Little Boxes' still strikes a chord today

Latest Episodes

U.S. elections 2020 and implications for the Americas

In this episode ofBerkeley Talks, experts discuss the forces that shaped the outcome of the U.S. elections in November and the implications of the elections for the U.S. and the countries of Latin America."Hispanics are the new swing voters," said Maria Escheveste, a senior scholar at the Center for Latin American Studies (CLAS) and president and CEO of the Opportunity Institute, who joined Paul Pierson, a professor of political science at Berkeley, and Colombian investigative journalist Daniel Coronell, at the Nov. 20, 2020 campus webinar.It's imperative that Democrats realize that the Latinx community isn't a monolith, she said, and that immigration isn't the only issue every Latinx person cares about. "We are so diverse because we're generationally diverse — linguistically, racially, ethnically," said Escheveste. "Demography is not destiny."Listen to the discussion and read a transcript on Berkeley News. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

80 min1 d ago
Comments
U.S. elections 2020 and implications for the Americas

Threats to abortion rights and how people are resisting

In this episode of Berkeley Talks, a panel of scholars — Berkeley Law professor Khiara Bridges; Carol Joffe, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at UC San Francisco; and Jill Adams, co-founder and executive director of the Center on Reproductive Rights and Justice at Berkeley Law — discuss how race, class and reproductive rights intersect and how people are choosing and resorting to self-directed and community-directed care to circumnavigate the structural inequalities in health care access.Listen to the episode and read a transcript on Berkeley News. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

83 min1 w ago
Comments
Threats to abortion rights and how people are resisting

How Native women challenged a 1900s Bay Area assimilation program

This episode of Berkeley Talks isa 2019 interview on KALX's The Graduates with Katie Keliiaa, a graduate student in UC Berkeley's Department of Ethnic Studies. In this interview, Keliiaa discusses her research on the Bay Area Outing Program, an early 20th century assimilation program that took Native American women out of their tribal lands and brought them to the Bay Area to perform domestic work.Listen to the episode and read the transcript on Berkeley News. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

32 minNOV 8
Comments
How Native women challenged a 1900s Bay Area assimilation program

How Mary Shelley's 'Frankenstein' took on a life of its own

In this special Halloween-inspired episode of Berkeley Talks, UC Berkeley Chancellor Carol Christ joins Manual Cinema's co-artistic director Drew Dir to discuss the collective's presentation of Frankenstein, a Cal Performances co-commission, in a talk moderated by Cal Performances' executive and artistic director Jeremy Geffen.Listen to the talk and read a transcript on Berkeley News. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

23 minOCT 28
Comments
How Mary Shelley's 'Frankenstein' took on a life of its own

The violent underworlds of El Salvador and their ties to the U.S.

In this Berkeley Talks episode, Salvadoran American journalist and activist Roberto Lovato, discusses his new book Unforgetting: A Memoir of Family, Migration, Gangs, and Revolution in the Americas,with Jess Alvarenga, an investigative reporter and documentary filmmaker and a graduate of UC Berkeley's Graduate School of Journalism.In Unforgetting, Lovato exposes how the U.S.-backed military dictatorship was responsible for killing 85% of the 75,000 to 80,000 people killed during the Salvadoran Civil War that was fought from 1979 to 1992."The book is ... a journey through different underworlds — the underworlds of the guerillas, the underworlds of the gangs, the underworlds of our family histories and secrets, the underworld of the secrets of nations, the things that countries don't like for us to know, I mean, which is theoretically how you get a president like Donald Trump, for example," said Lovato.Listen and read the transcript on Berkeley News. See acast.com/privacy for privacy...

76 minOCT 24
Comments
The violent underworlds of El Salvador and their ties to the U.S.

Portraits of power: Women of the 116th Congress

"I would say the loudest, boldest, most powerful voices coming out of Washington have been the voices of women," said U.S. Rep. Lauren Underwood (IL-14). "The way that we, collectively, have reframed the conversation about where this country is going has really, I think, been jarring for some of those who have been the power class in Washington for decades."Underwood was part of a panel that discussed the history-making women of the 116th Congress, and a recently published New York Times book that features powerful portraits of all but one Congresswoman. Also part of the conversation was Rep. Jackie Speier (CA-14), UC Berkeley Ph.D. candidate in political science and photojournalist Elizabeth Herman and New York Times photo editor Marisa Schwartz Taylor.Listen to the discussion and read a transcript on Berkeley News. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

60 minOCT 9
Comments
Portraits of power: Women of the 116th Congress

Berkeley scholars on the legal legacy of Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Following the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Sept. 18, 2020, Berkeley Law professors — Amanda Tyler, Catherine Fisk, Orin Kerr, Bertrall Ross and Dean Erwin Chemerinsky — came together to discuss Ginsburg's legacy, what will be the likely effects of her no longer being in the Supreme Court and what is likely to happen in the nomination and confirmation process of a new justice."Her legacy as an advocate completely changed the face of American society," said Tyler, who clerked for Ginsburg in 1999. "As an advocate, she opened the eyes of the Supreme Court to the lived experiences of both men and women who are held back by gender stereotypes. Because of that, she was able to convince them, to educate them, to teach them as to how gender stereotypes do that, not just to women but to men as well, and how putting women on a pedestal, as Justice Brennan said, and Justice Ginsburg loved this quote, is actually putting them in a cage. It's holding them back."Read a transcript and...

67 minSEP 28
Comments
Berkeley scholars on the legal legacy of Ruth Bader Ginsburg

How plantation museum tours distort the reality of slavery

In this Berkeley Talks episode, Stephen Small, a professor in UC Berkeley's Department of African American Studies, and interim director for the Institute for the Study of Societal Issues, discusses research from his upcoming book, tentatively titled Inside the Shadows of the Big House: 21st Century Antebellum Slave Cabins and Heritage Tourism in Louisiana.Since the 1990s, Small has visited more than 200 plantation museum sites in 10 states. Tours of these sites included narratives that privileged white elites and consistently avoided mention of slavery and the experience of enslaved people, says Small."Slavery is typically described in passive, general and abstract ways," said Small. "If mentioned at all, Black people typically appear as an undifferentiated stereotypical mass, with few exceptions."Listen to the episode and read the transcript on Berkeley News. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

60 minSEP 25
Comments
How plantation museum tours distort the reality of slavery

How to use sleep and circadian science to get better rest

As the global pandemic stretches on and massive wildfires rage along the West Coast, many people are finding it hard — if not impossible — to get the restful sleep they need. But Allison Harvey, a professor of clinical psychology and director of the Golden Bear Sleep and Mood Research Clinic at UC Berkeley, says although anxiety can make it more difficult to sleep well, there are evidence-based treatments that can help."I think as humans, at this point, we either have too many people in our lives and in our faces, or we're lonely and we're maybe feeling that as we go off to sleep," said Harvey, of life during the pandemic. "We need to go to safe burrows and nests in order to sleep. So, things that are comforting really make a difference to us."On Aug. 7, Harvey gave a talk, sponsored by the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI), about how changing certain behaviors — when and how we wake up and go to bed, for instance — can allow us to experience the sleep rhythms we naturall...

59 minSEP 11
Comments
How to use sleep and circadian science to get better rest

Why the 1960s song 'Little Boxes' still strikes a chord today

"Little boxes on the hillside. Little boxes made of ticky tacky. Little boxes on the hillside. Little boxes all the same. There’s a pink one, and a green one, and a blue one and a yellow one. And they're all made out of ticky tacky and they all look just the same.And the people in the houses all went to the university, where they were put in boxes and they came out all the same. And there's doctors and lawyers and business executives, and they're all made out of ticky tacky and they all look just the same."That's the first part of the song "Little Boxes," written by Berkeley alumna and political activist Malvina Reynolds in 1962. In the first episode of a new campus podcast — the Berkeley Podcast for Music — professor Nicholas Mathew talks with Reynolds' daughter, Nancy Schimmel, as well as Berkeley professors Margaret Crawford from architecture, Timothy Hampton from French and comparative literature and Maria Sonevytsky from music. They discuss Reynolds' life, music, activism an...

47 minAUG 28
Comments
Why the 1960s song 'Little Boxes' still strikes a chord today
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