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Free Astronomy Public Lectures

Swinburne University of Technology

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10
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Free Astronomy Public Lectures

Free Astronomy Public Lectures

Swinburne University of Technology

6
Followers
10
Plays
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About Us

Each month, from February to November, the Centre for Astrophysics & Supercomputing presents a free public lecture at the Hawthorn campus of Swinburne University of Technology.

Latest Episodes

The Dark Side of the Universe (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Presented by Sara Webb and Grace Lawrence on Friday 28 February 2020. When we look to the stars, what we see is a fraction of the universe – only around 5%. Astronomers observe that a mysterious ‘dark universe’ of strange and enigmatic dark energy and dark matter makes up the remaining 95%. Swinburne PhD candidates Sara Webb and Grace Lawrence are working to unravel the mysteries of this dark universe, exploring the fundamental origins and nature of dark energy and dark matter.

76 MINMAR 11
Comments
The Dark Side of the Universe (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

The Never-Ending Story of a Star (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Presented by Renee Spiewak on Friday 20 September 2019. Like humans, stars often live their long lives in pairs, called binaries. At the end of their lives, they experience drastic transformations, rather than simply ending, and these transformations greatly affect their companions. In this lecture, I will take you on a journey of the many lives (and spectacular deaths/rebirths) of a massive star with a lighter companion star. The mass of a star, among other factors, determines the path it takes and the changes it experiences, and stars in binaries affect each other greatly. In a quiet stellar neighbourhood, this massive star will peacefully spend millions of years with its companion before undergoing a sudden transformation into one of the most extreme objects in the universe. Billions of years later, a second transformation will occur when the star’s companion quietly reaches the end of its life. However, under the right conditions, the pair’s story will not end there.

60 MIN2019 SEP 20
Comments
The Never-Ending Story of a Star (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Space law - It's not rocket science (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Presented by Kim Ellis on Friday, 19 July 2019. This will be an informative lecture on how Australia is making a splash on the international space arena as the Australian Space Agency turns one. We will also be celebrating the 50th anniversary of the moon landing.

53 MIN2019 JUL 19
Comments
Space law - It's not rocket science (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

The vivid lives of stars (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Presented by Poojan Agrawal on the 21st June 2019. Beyond the twinkling dots in the night sky, there are all sorts of stars that are beautiful and fascinating their own sense. I will share the story of how we came to understand these stars as we know them today using the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram and the importance of the lives of these stars in the present-day astrophysical problems.

57 MIN2019 JUN 21
Comments
The vivid lives of stars (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Things that go bump in the night: fast radio bursts and the search for life beyond Earth (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Presented by Dr Daniel C Price on 22nd February 2019. Thanks to new, more powerful technology, astronomers can search the skies faster and with more resolution than ever before. In this public lecture, I will talk about two exciting fields in astronomy: the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI), and Fast Radio Bursts. The SETI field has been reinvigorated by the 10-year, $100M Breakthrough Listen initiative to search for intelligent life beyond Earth. As a project scientist for Breakthrough Listen, I will introduce the program and detail how we are using new technology to run the most comprehensive search for intelligent life beyond Earth ever undertaken. I will also discuss a mysterious phenomenon known as fast radio bursts: incredibly bright but short-lived signals from distant galaxies, which escaped detection until recently. Could these signals be due to intelligent aliens, or is there an astrophysical explanation? I will give an overview of how a telescope upgrade wil...

49 MIN2019 FEB 22
Comments
Things that go bump in the night: fast radio bursts and the search for life beyond Earth (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Breakthrough! The detection of gravitational waves from a neutron star merger (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Presented by Assoc. Prof. Tara Murphy on 23 November 2018. On August 17th 2017 the LIGO-Virgo interferometer detected gravitational waves from a neutron star merger in a galaxy 130 million light years away. This was a breakthrough for physics and astronomy. What followed was a frenzy of activity as astronomers around the world worked to detect electromagnetic radiation with conventional telescopes. After this unprecedented effort the event was detected in gamma-rays, x-rays, visible light and radio waves. I will discuss this incredible scientific result and its implications, including: predictions made by Einstein; the production of gold and other heavy elements; and our understanding of black hole formation. I will also give a 'behind the scenes' perspective of how it happened, and discuss the changes in the way we do science in this era of big astronomy.

54 MIN2018 NOV 26
Comments
Breakthrough! The detection of gravitational waves from a neutron star merger (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

The rapidly growing world of Indigenous astronomy (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Presented by Dr Duane Hamacher and Krystal De Napoli on 1st June 2018. The subject of Indigenous astronomy has skyrocketed in recent years all around the globe. A constant stream of emerging research is changing what we think we know about Aboriginal knowledge systems in Australia and the number of Aboriginal students studying astrophysics is rapidly growing. This lecture will introduce you to one of these students, Kamilaroi woman and astrophysics student Krystal De Napoli, and the research she and Dr Duane Hamacher are conducting with other Aboriginal researchers on topics ranging from Moon haloes, Sun Dogs, and supernovae to the antiquity of deep time oral traditions based on astronomical and geological evidence - even the official naming of Aboriginal stars by the IAU. This talk will explore the many ways in which Indigenous Australians encoded scientific information in their knowledge systems and some of the ways in which they pass this knowledge to successive generations.

68 MIN2018 NOV 21
Comments
The rapidly growing world of Indigenous astronomy (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Hidden Features: Discovery space in a reluctant Universe (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Presented on 19 October 2018 by Dr Michelle Cluver. The more we learn about the universe, the mosre it tends to surprise us. This is one of the most exciting aspects of science - making unexpected discoveries! In this talk I will present some recent scientific discoveries I have been involved with and discuss why these and other discoveries have us so excited about the Square Kilometre Array Pathfinders, MeerKAT and ASKAP.

59 MIN2018 OCT 19
Comments
Hidden Features: Discovery space in a reluctant Universe (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Deeper, Wider, Faster: Chasing the fastest bursts in the Universe (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Presented by Assoc. Prof. Jeff Cooke on 11 May 2018. When you look up a the night sky, it appears static and unchanging. However, a closer look using telescopes finds it to be wildly violent. Objects explode, erupt and burst on all time scales, from millions of years to months to milliseconds. Many of these events have been studies in great detail but the fastest have been the most difficult to catch largely because of the technological limitations. This presentation will discuss these fast bursts and our program to catch them.

63 MIN2018 JUN 11
Comments
Deeper, Wider, Faster: Chasing the fastest bursts in the Universe (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Cosmic mirages: seeing dark matter with gravitational lenses (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Presented by Prof. Mike Hudson on 16th March 2018. Most of the matter in the Universe is dark matter: an elusive particle that is completely invisible. But we can “see” this matter by studying how it distorts the light from galaxies in the distant Universe, a phenomenon called gravitational lensing. I will give a whirlwind tour of gravitational lensing’s “greatest hits” showing how it can be used as a tool to understand some of the most mysterious things in the Universe: from black holes to the “cosmic web” of dark matter that links galaxies together.

56 MIN2018 MAR 15
Comments
Cosmic mirages: seeing dark matter with gravitational lenses (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Latest Episodes

The Dark Side of the Universe (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Presented by Sara Webb and Grace Lawrence on Friday 28 February 2020. When we look to the stars, what we see is a fraction of the universe – only around 5%. Astronomers observe that a mysterious ‘dark universe’ of strange and enigmatic dark energy and dark matter makes up the remaining 95%. Swinburne PhD candidates Sara Webb and Grace Lawrence are working to unravel the mysteries of this dark universe, exploring the fundamental origins and nature of dark energy and dark matter.

76 MINMAR 11
Comments
The Dark Side of the Universe (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

The Never-Ending Story of a Star (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Presented by Renee Spiewak on Friday 20 September 2019. Like humans, stars often live their long lives in pairs, called binaries. At the end of their lives, they experience drastic transformations, rather than simply ending, and these transformations greatly affect their companions. In this lecture, I will take you on a journey of the many lives (and spectacular deaths/rebirths) of a massive star with a lighter companion star. The mass of a star, among other factors, determines the path it takes and the changes it experiences, and stars in binaries affect each other greatly. In a quiet stellar neighbourhood, this massive star will peacefully spend millions of years with its companion before undergoing a sudden transformation into one of the most extreme objects in the universe. Billions of years later, a second transformation will occur when the star’s companion quietly reaches the end of its life. However, under the right conditions, the pair’s story will not end there.

60 MIN2019 SEP 20
Comments
The Never-Ending Story of a Star (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Space law - It's not rocket science (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Presented by Kim Ellis on Friday, 19 July 2019. This will be an informative lecture on how Australia is making a splash on the international space arena as the Australian Space Agency turns one. We will also be celebrating the 50th anniversary of the moon landing.

53 MIN2019 JUL 19
Comments
Space law - It's not rocket science (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

The vivid lives of stars (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Presented by Poojan Agrawal on the 21st June 2019. Beyond the twinkling dots in the night sky, there are all sorts of stars that are beautiful and fascinating their own sense. I will share the story of how we came to understand these stars as we know them today using the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram and the importance of the lives of these stars in the present-day astrophysical problems.

57 MIN2019 JUN 21
Comments
The vivid lives of stars (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Things that go bump in the night: fast radio bursts and the search for life beyond Earth (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Presented by Dr Daniel C Price on 22nd February 2019. Thanks to new, more powerful technology, astronomers can search the skies faster and with more resolution than ever before. In this public lecture, I will talk about two exciting fields in astronomy: the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI), and Fast Radio Bursts. The SETI field has been reinvigorated by the 10-year, $100M Breakthrough Listen initiative to search for intelligent life beyond Earth. As a project scientist for Breakthrough Listen, I will introduce the program and detail how we are using new technology to run the most comprehensive search for intelligent life beyond Earth ever undertaken. I will also discuss a mysterious phenomenon known as fast radio bursts: incredibly bright but short-lived signals from distant galaxies, which escaped detection until recently. Could these signals be due to intelligent aliens, or is there an astrophysical explanation? I will give an overview of how a telescope upgrade wil...

49 MIN2019 FEB 22
Comments
Things that go bump in the night: fast radio bursts and the search for life beyond Earth (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Breakthrough! The detection of gravitational waves from a neutron star merger (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Presented by Assoc. Prof. Tara Murphy on 23 November 2018. On August 17th 2017 the LIGO-Virgo interferometer detected gravitational waves from a neutron star merger in a galaxy 130 million light years away. This was a breakthrough for physics and astronomy. What followed was a frenzy of activity as astronomers around the world worked to detect electromagnetic radiation with conventional telescopes. After this unprecedented effort the event was detected in gamma-rays, x-rays, visible light and radio waves. I will discuss this incredible scientific result and its implications, including: predictions made by Einstein; the production of gold and other heavy elements; and our understanding of black hole formation. I will also give a 'behind the scenes' perspective of how it happened, and discuss the changes in the way we do science in this era of big astronomy.

54 MIN2018 NOV 26
Comments
Breakthrough! The detection of gravitational waves from a neutron star merger (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

The rapidly growing world of Indigenous astronomy (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Presented by Dr Duane Hamacher and Krystal De Napoli on 1st June 2018. The subject of Indigenous astronomy has skyrocketed in recent years all around the globe. A constant stream of emerging research is changing what we think we know about Aboriginal knowledge systems in Australia and the number of Aboriginal students studying astrophysics is rapidly growing. This lecture will introduce you to one of these students, Kamilaroi woman and astrophysics student Krystal De Napoli, and the research she and Dr Duane Hamacher are conducting with other Aboriginal researchers on topics ranging from Moon haloes, Sun Dogs, and supernovae to the antiquity of deep time oral traditions based on astronomical and geological evidence - even the official naming of Aboriginal stars by the IAU. This talk will explore the many ways in which Indigenous Australians encoded scientific information in their knowledge systems and some of the ways in which they pass this knowledge to successive generations.

68 MIN2018 NOV 21
Comments
The rapidly growing world of Indigenous astronomy (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Hidden Features: Discovery space in a reluctant Universe (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Presented on 19 October 2018 by Dr Michelle Cluver. The more we learn about the universe, the mosre it tends to surprise us. This is one of the most exciting aspects of science - making unexpected discoveries! In this talk I will present some recent scientific discoveries I have been involved with and discuss why these and other discoveries have us so excited about the Square Kilometre Array Pathfinders, MeerKAT and ASKAP.

59 MIN2018 OCT 19
Comments
Hidden Features: Discovery space in a reluctant Universe (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Deeper, Wider, Faster: Chasing the fastest bursts in the Universe (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Presented by Assoc. Prof. Jeff Cooke on 11 May 2018. When you look up a the night sky, it appears static and unchanging. However, a closer look using telescopes finds it to be wildly violent. Objects explode, erupt and burst on all time scales, from millions of years to months to milliseconds. Many of these events have been studies in great detail but the fastest have been the most difficult to catch largely because of the technological limitations. This presentation will discuss these fast bursts and our program to catch them.

63 MIN2018 JUN 11
Comments
Deeper, Wider, Faster: Chasing the fastest bursts in the Universe (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Cosmic mirages: seeing dark matter with gravitational lenses (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)

Presented by Prof. Mike Hudson on 16th March 2018. Most of the matter in the Universe is dark matter: an elusive particle that is completely invisible. But we can “see” this matter by studying how it distorts the light from galaxies in the distant Universe, a phenomenon called gravitational lensing. I will give a whirlwind tour of gravitational lensing’s “greatest hits” showing how it can be used as a tool to understand some of the most mysterious things in the Universe: from black holes to the “cosmic web” of dark matter that links galaxies together.

56 MIN2018 MAR 15
Comments
Cosmic mirages: seeing dark matter with gravitational lenses (Free Astronomy Public Lectures)
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