title

LSU Experimental

LSU Communication across the Curriculum and LSU College of Science

0
Followers
0
Plays
LSU Experimental

LSU Experimental

LSU Communication across the Curriculum and LSU College of Science

0
Followers
0
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Details

About Us

Experimental is a podcast series that features Louisiana State University faculty and students sharing their passion for research and their personal stories of investigation. Listen and learn about exciting projects and the individuals posing the questions.

Latest Episodes

Episode 33: Heidi Nowakowski - The First Semester of Medical School

Are you wondering how to get into medical school and what it will be like once you make it? What better than to hear from someone who just completed their first semester in med program! We are featuring LSU students at different stages in their medical career, from getting accepted to entering rotations. We begin with Heidi Nowakowski, LSU Spring 2019 College of Science graduate. Heidi is currently in her 2nd year in med school at LSU New Orleans, but we caught her in the middle of her first semester! She shared her insights into what it takes to get into medical school, the first semester transition struggles, and her advice on how to cope with med school stress.

48 MIN4 d ago
Comments
Episode 33: Heidi Nowakowski - The First Semester of Medical School

Episode 32: Anna Hiller - Hybridization in Andean Nectar Bandits

In nature, hybrid zones are where two species or varieties meet and cross-fertilize, such as the classic donkey + horse = mule. A single hybrid zone is scientifically important for understanding how species diverge. So imagine the excitement of finding not just one, but two hybrid zones in the Andes of South America. And even cooler, the hybrid zone is the home of a special type of bird, flowerpiercers, who steal nectar from plants using their pirate-hooked bills. Anna Hiller, LSU Museum of Natural Science PhD candidate, tells us what hybrid zones are, what we can learn from them, and how she is using the flowerpiercers as her model. She also shares adventures from her previous expeditions and how her passion to include women in science is informing her upcoming field trips to Peru and Bolivia.

55 MINJAN 17
Comments
Episode 32: Anna Hiller - Hybridization in Andean Nectar Bandits

Episode 31: Phillip Bart - The Past, Present & Future of Antarctica's Ice Sheets

At this very moment, the ice sheets covering and surrounding Antarctica are dynamic, moving and receding in response to temperature and other factors. Some of the changes are abrupt and quite apparent, like calving events where large chunks of ice break off of glaciers and plunge into the ocean. Others are more subtle because the movement of the ice is occurring slowly, like it has done for over thousands of years. Dr. Phil Bart, LSU College of Science Geology & Geophysics professor, invites us to learn about the evolution of Antarctic ice sheets and how he investigates the movement of ice sheets and ice rises over geologic time to aid in predicting their future behavior.

66 MIN2019 NOV 14
Comments
Episode 31: Phillip Bart - The Past, Present & Future of Antarctica's Ice Sheets

Episode 30: Keith Comeaux -Engineering the Mars 2020 Rover Mission

What’s it like to launch an SUV-sized rover to another planet and ensure that, on arrival, the rover will be able to complete scientific missions AND be controlled from Earth? This is exactly what Dr. Keith Comeaux, Deputy Chief Engineer at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and his team are tackling for the Mars 2020 Mission. In this episode, Dr. Comeaux leads us through the complexities involved in designing Mars rovers his career path from LSU to NASA, and the potential prospects of discovery for the Mars 2020 Mission.

62 MIN2019 OCT 9
Comments
Episode 30: Keith Comeaux -Engineering the Mars 2020 Rover Mission

Episode 29: Valerie Derouen - Packaging Science into Outreach Activities

Who is responsible for creating a bridge between the scientists asking questions and the curious public? The answer, Outreach Specialists. In this episode we speak with Valerie Derouen, the LSU Museum of Natural Science’s very own outreach coordinator. Valerie is tasked with packaging the hardcore science and conservation efforts done by museum researchers into activities that engange audiences of all ages. We learn what a typical day looks like for an Outreach Specialist, how to develop activities for public events and spaces, the curves in Valerie’s science career that led her to the museum, and how she hopes to inspire the next generation of scientists.

66 MIN2019 SEP 11
Comments
Episode 29: Valerie Derouen - Packaging Science into Outreach Activities

Episode 28: Rebecca Christofferson - Pesky Blood Sucker & the Arboviruses They Carry

Mosquitos can cause more than an itchy welt. They are vectors of arboviruses. But what is an arbovirus? Dr. Rebecca Christofferson, Assistant Professor of Pathobiological Sciences from the School of Veterinary Medicine, presented her research on the transmission of these harmful viruses and how we can protect ourselves from them during LSU’s Science Cafe Talk in July 2017. Following her presentation, we continued all things mosquitoes and dove into a range of topics including vector borne disease spread, the systematic spraying of Deet, mosquito trivia, and the vulnerability of different countries to these rapid outbreaks.

53 MIN2019 AUG 8
Comments
Episode 28: Rebecca Christofferson - Pesky Blood Sucker & the Arboviruses They Carry

Episode 27: Zack Rodriguez - Straight out of nature! It’s Green-blooded lizards

Get ready for the weird! We’re learning all about Green-blooded lizards - not from a sci-fi movie, but straight out of nature! Papua New Guinea to be exact. We’re joined by Zack Rodriguez, PhD Candidate in the College of Science’s Museum of Natural Sciences, to learn all about green-blooded lizards, the importance of studying green blood, and how Zack is preparing for an upcoming expedition to Papua New Guinea to discover more.

60 MIN2019 JUL 4
Comments
Episode 27: Zack Rodriguez - Straight out of nature! It’s Green-blooded lizards

Episode 26: #ScientistsWhoSelfie with Dr. Paige Brown Jarreau

How can the problematic science stereotypes be dismantled? With selfies! It’s National Selfie Day and we’re marking the occasion with my co-author, Dr. Paige Brown Jarreau. Paige and I along with Lance Porter from the LSU Manship School, Imogene Cancellare from the University of New Hampshire, Dr. Samantha Yammine from the University of Toronto, and Daniel Toker from the University of California Berkeley, explored the role of science self portraits play in addressing problematic stereotypes. The project was crowdfunded through Experiment.com and launched the #ScientistsWhoSelfie hashtag. The hashtag has been used over 14k times on Instagram and formed a community of scientists and science enthusiasts sharing discoveries! Check out @ScientistSeflies on Instagram to see more! Paige and I discuss the inspiration behind the project, the results, and the next steps for changing stereotypes of scientists. The study, “Using selfies to challenge public stereotypes of scientists” in PLOS One (https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0216625)

39 MIN2019 JUN 21
Comments
Episode 26: #ScientistsWhoSelfie with Dr. Paige Brown Jarreau

Episode 25: Michael Pasquier - The Cultural Connections of People, Land, & Water in Louisiana

What composes a community and the cultures within? In Southern Louisiana, communities are constructed by the people and the ecosystems that surround. Michael Pasquier, Associate Professor of Religious Studies and History and the Jaak Seynaeve Professor of Christian Studies, begins our conversation with Our Lady of Prompt Succor and the prayers offered to protect the people of Southern Louisiana from approaching storms. The connections of the people to the land and water shape the culture of those that call Louisiana home. We explore these connections and how the stories of the past can help us prepare for the future.

52 MIN2019 JUN 7
Comments
Episode 25: Michael Pasquier - The Cultural Connections of People, Land, & Water in Louisiana

Episode 24: Hayley Johnson & Sarah Simms - Japanese Internment Camps in Louisiana

Did you know that over 1000 Japanese men were interned in Louisiana during WWII? Hayley Johnson and Sarah Simms, passionate librarians from LSU Libraries, explore this buried history in our own backyard. We discuss who these Japanese men and their families were, the conditions at the Louisiana internment camps, and the crucial lessons we need to remember in order to fight against the discrimination of those who are different.

54 MIN2019 MAY 23
Comments
Episode 24: Hayley Johnson & Sarah Simms - Japanese Internment Camps in Louisiana

Latest Episodes

Episode 33: Heidi Nowakowski - The First Semester of Medical School

Are you wondering how to get into medical school and what it will be like once you make it? What better than to hear from someone who just completed their first semester in med program! We are featuring LSU students at different stages in their medical career, from getting accepted to entering rotations. We begin with Heidi Nowakowski, LSU Spring 2019 College of Science graduate. Heidi is currently in her 2nd year in med school at LSU New Orleans, but we caught her in the middle of her first semester! She shared her insights into what it takes to get into medical school, the first semester transition struggles, and her advice on how to cope with med school stress.

48 MIN4 d ago
Comments
Episode 33: Heidi Nowakowski - The First Semester of Medical School

Episode 32: Anna Hiller - Hybridization in Andean Nectar Bandits

In nature, hybrid zones are where two species or varieties meet and cross-fertilize, such as the classic donkey + horse = mule. A single hybrid zone is scientifically important for understanding how species diverge. So imagine the excitement of finding not just one, but two hybrid zones in the Andes of South America. And even cooler, the hybrid zone is the home of a special type of bird, flowerpiercers, who steal nectar from plants using their pirate-hooked bills. Anna Hiller, LSU Museum of Natural Science PhD candidate, tells us what hybrid zones are, what we can learn from them, and how she is using the flowerpiercers as her model. She also shares adventures from her previous expeditions and how her passion to include women in science is informing her upcoming field trips to Peru and Bolivia.

55 MINJAN 17
Comments
Episode 32: Anna Hiller - Hybridization in Andean Nectar Bandits

Episode 31: Phillip Bart - The Past, Present & Future of Antarctica's Ice Sheets

At this very moment, the ice sheets covering and surrounding Antarctica are dynamic, moving and receding in response to temperature and other factors. Some of the changes are abrupt and quite apparent, like calving events where large chunks of ice break off of glaciers and plunge into the ocean. Others are more subtle because the movement of the ice is occurring slowly, like it has done for over thousands of years. Dr. Phil Bart, LSU College of Science Geology & Geophysics professor, invites us to learn about the evolution of Antarctic ice sheets and how he investigates the movement of ice sheets and ice rises over geologic time to aid in predicting their future behavior.

66 MIN2019 NOV 14
Comments
Episode 31: Phillip Bart - The Past, Present & Future of Antarctica's Ice Sheets

Episode 30: Keith Comeaux -Engineering the Mars 2020 Rover Mission

What’s it like to launch an SUV-sized rover to another planet and ensure that, on arrival, the rover will be able to complete scientific missions AND be controlled from Earth? This is exactly what Dr. Keith Comeaux, Deputy Chief Engineer at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and his team are tackling for the Mars 2020 Mission. In this episode, Dr. Comeaux leads us through the complexities involved in designing Mars rovers his career path from LSU to NASA, and the potential prospects of discovery for the Mars 2020 Mission.

62 MIN2019 OCT 9
Comments
Episode 30: Keith Comeaux -Engineering the Mars 2020 Rover Mission

Episode 29: Valerie Derouen - Packaging Science into Outreach Activities

Who is responsible for creating a bridge between the scientists asking questions and the curious public? The answer, Outreach Specialists. In this episode we speak with Valerie Derouen, the LSU Museum of Natural Science’s very own outreach coordinator. Valerie is tasked with packaging the hardcore science and conservation efforts done by museum researchers into activities that engange audiences of all ages. We learn what a typical day looks like for an Outreach Specialist, how to develop activities for public events and spaces, the curves in Valerie’s science career that led her to the museum, and how she hopes to inspire the next generation of scientists.

66 MIN2019 SEP 11
Comments
Episode 29: Valerie Derouen - Packaging Science into Outreach Activities

Episode 28: Rebecca Christofferson - Pesky Blood Sucker & the Arboviruses They Carry

Mosquitos can cause more than an itchy welt. They are vectors of arboviruses. But what is an arbovirus? Dr. Rebecca Christofferson, Assistant Professor of Pathobiological Sciences from the School of Veterinary Medicine, presented her research on the transmission of these harmful viruses and how we can protect ourselves from them during LSU’s Science Cafe Talk in July 2017. Following her presentation, we continued all things mosquitoes and dove into a range of topics including vector borne disease spread, the systematic spraying of Deet, mosquito trivia, and the vulnerability of different countries to these rapid outbreaks.

53 MIN2019 AUG 8
Comments
Episode 28: Rebecca Christofferson - Pesky Blood Sucker & the Arboviruses They Carry

Episode 27: Zack Rodriguez - Straight out of nature! It’s Green-blooded lizards

Get ready for the weird! We’re learning all about Green-blooded lizards - not from a sci-fi movie, but straight out of nature! Papua New Guinea to be exact. We’re joined by Zack Rodriguez, PhD Candidate in the College of Science’s Museum of Natural Sciences, to learn all about green-blooded lizards, the importance of studying green blood, and how Zack is preparing for an upcoming expedition to Papua New Guinea to discover more.

60 MIN2019 JUL 4
Comments
Episode 27: Zack Rodriguez - Straight out of nature! It’s Green-blooded lizards

Episode 26: #ScientistsWhoSelfie with Dr. Paige Brown Jarreau

How can the problematic science stereotypes be dismantled? With selfies! It’s National Selfie Day and we’re marking the occasion with my co-author, Dr. Paige Brown Jarreau. Paige and I along with Lance Porter from the LSU Manship School, Imogene Cancellare from the University of New Hampshire, Dr. Samantha Yammine from the University of Toronto, and Daniel Toker from the University of California Berkeley, explored the role of science self portraits play in addressing problematic stereotypes. The project was crowdfunded through Experiment.com and launched the #ScientistsWhoSelfie hashtag. The hashtag has been used over 14k times on Instagram and formed a community of scientists and science enthusiasts sharing discoveries! Check out @ScientistSeflies on Instagram to see more! Paige and I discuss the inspiration behind the project, the results, and the next steps for changing stereotypes of scientists. The study, “Using selfies to challenge public stereotypes of scientists” in PLOS One (https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0216625)

39 MIN2019 JUN 21
Comments
Episode 26: #ScientistsWhoSelfie with Dr. Paige Brown Jarreau

Episode 25: Michael Pasquier - The Cultural Connections of People, Land, & Water in Louisiana

What composes a community and the cultures within? In Southern Louisiana, communities are constructed by the people and the ecosystems that surround. Michael Pasquier, Associate Professor of Religious Studies and History and the Jaak Seynaeve Professor of Christian Studies, begins our conversation with Our Lady of Prompt Succor and the prayers offered to protect the people of Southern Louisiana from approaching storms. The connections of the people to the land and water shape the culture of those that call Louisiana home. We explore these connections and how the stories of the past can help us prepare for the future.

52 MIN2019 JUN 7
Comments
Episode 25: Michael Pasquier - The Cultural Connections of People, Land, & Water in Louisiana

Episode 24: Hayley Johnson & Sarah Simms - Japanese Internment Camps in Louisiana

Did you know that over 1000 Japanese men were interned in Louisiana during WWII? Hayley Johnson and Sarah Simms, passionate librarians from LSU Libraries, explore this buried history in our own backyard. We discuss who these Japanese men and their families were, the conditions at the Louisiana internment camps, and the crucial lessons we need to remember in order to fight against the discrimination of those who are different.

54 MIN2019 MAY 23
Comments
Episode 24: Hayley Johnson & Sarah Simms - Japanese Internment Camps in Louisiana
hmly
himalayaプレミアムへようこそ聴き放題のオーディオブックをお楽しみください。