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Philosophy Talk Starters

Philosophy Talk Starters

47
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94
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Philosophy Talk Starters

Philosophy Talk Starters

Philosophy Talk Starters

47
Followers
94
Plays
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Podcast by Philosophy Talk Starters

Latest Episodes

502: Comforting Conversations (Part 2)

More at www.philosophytalk.org/shows/comforting-conversations-pt2. In troubling, uncertain times, the arts and humanities are more important than ever. Engaging with works of literature can provide both much needed insight into our current struggles and a sense of perspective in a crisis. In what ways do novels or plays help us come to terms with human suffering? Can fictional narratives about past pandemics shed light on our current situation? And how can storytelling or music help bring us together in isolation? Josh and Ray converse with a range of Stanford faculty members about how philosophy, music, drama, and literature can provide comfort, connection, and a sense of community. • Ge Wang on making music across great distances • Laura Wittman on Alessandro Manzoni's "The Betrothed" • Harry Elam on August Wilson's "Joe Turner's Come and Gone" •Antonia Peacocke on the surprising philosophy of meditation

13 MIN5 d ago
Comments
502: Comforting Conversations (Part 2)

501: Comforting Coversations (Part 1)

More at www.philosophytalk.org/shows/comforting-conversations-pt1. In troubling, uncertain times, the arts and humanities are more important than ever. Engaging with works of literature can provide both much needed insight into our current struggles and a sense of perspective in a crisis. In what ways do novels or plays help us come to terms with human suffering? Can fictional narratives about past pandemics shed light on our current situation? And how can storytelling or music help bring us together in isolation? Josh and Ray converse with a range of Stanford faculty members about how philosophy, music, drama, and literature can provide comfort, connection, and a sense of community. • Lanier Anderson on Albert Camus' The Plague • Michaela Bronstein on narrative and fiction as imaginative tools • Ato Quayson on the social value of oral storytelling

12 MIN1 w ago
Comments
501: Comforting Coversations (Part 1)

459: The Value of Care - Feminism and Ethics

More at www.philosophytalk.org/shows/value-care. We sometimes think of the domains of ethics and morality as divorced from feeling and emotion. You keep your promises because it maximizes good. But what if care were thought of as the bedrock of morality? While we know that more care work is performed by women, would a care-based approach to ethics be feminist, or merely feminine? What would it look like for us to build our institutions around the goal of promoting care? Debra and Ken take care to welcome Joan Tronto from the University of Minnesota, author of "Who Cares?: How to Reshape a Democratic Politics."

11 MIN2 w ago
Comments
459: The Value of Care - Feminism and Ethics

354: Machiavelli

More at www.philosophytalk.org/shows/machiavelli. Niccolò Machiavelli is best known for arguing that people in power should use deception, force, and manipulation if those tactics are necessary to achieve their ends. In an age of unscrupulous politics and ruthless business practice, shouldn't we be encouraging a move away from Machiavellian thinking? Then again, are we even sure that those "Machiavellian" views were really Machiavelli's? If not, what did he really think, and what might we learn from him? John and Ken plot and scheme with Maurizio Viroli from Princeton University, author of "Redeeming the Prince: The Meaning of Machiavelli's Masterpiece."

10 MIN3 w ago
Comments
354: Machiavelli

499: (Why) Money Matters

More at www.philosophytalk.org/shows/why-money-matters. Money, they say, does not buy happiness; but having none can make life extraordinarily hard. Whether we have a little or a lot, we are all familiar with how much money matters in our daily lives. But what exactly is money? Is it a commodity that evolved spontaneously from systems of barter? Or is it purely an invention of government, used as a means to pay off tax liability? What difference would the answer make to things like job creation, inflation, and government spending? And how do modern inventions like cryptocurrency fit into a theory of money? The philosophers go on a spending spree with Graham Hubbs from the University of Idaho, editor of "Pragmatism, Law, and Language."

9 MINAPR 27
Comments
499: (Why) Money Matters

278: Poetry as a Way of Knowing

More at www.philosophytalk.org/shows/poetry-way-knowing. What is poetry? Mere word play? A pretty, or at any rate striking, way of expressing thought and emotion? Or does great poetry involve an approach to the world that provides insight and information not available in other ways? Ken and John explore how poetry can illuminate what we know with award-winning poet Jane Hirshfield, author of "Come, Thief" and other poetic works of philosophical richness.

6 MINAPR 19
Comments
278: Poetry as a Way of Knowing

498: Philosophy and the Superhero

More at www.philosophytalk.org/shows/philosophy-and-superhero. Philosophy is replete with thought experiments featuring characters like Descartes’ “Evil Genius” and Davidson’s “Swampman.” Some of the scenarios philosophers conjure up seem like they could’ve been plucked from a superhero comic. Or is it the other way around? Why do philosophy and superhero comics employ such similar thought experiments? Is there something about the comic book—a medium that is both visual and lexical—that particularly lends itself to philosophical thinking? And what would a philosophy of the superhero look like? The philosophers save the world with Nathaniel Goldberg from Washington and Lee University, co-author of "Superhero Thought Experiments: Comic Book Philosophy."

8 MINAPR 13
Comments
498: Philosophy and the Superhero

447: Fractured Identities

More at www.philosophytalk.org/shows/fractured-identities. Despite tremendous strides made towards civil and political rights in the United States, discrimination and exclusion based on race, class, gender, and sexuality are still pervasive. As a result, individuals seen as "the other" often experience a painful inner fracturing W.E.B. Du Bois called "double consciousness." So, how does one shape a coherent identity in a world where one is considered "other"? What effects do micro aggressions have on the ability to develop a unified self? And what role might community play in helping heal fractured identities? The Philosophers identify with Julie Lythcott-Haims, author of "Real American: A Memoir."

10 MINAPR 5
Comments
447: Fractured Identities

446: Philosophy of Retirement

More at www.philosophytalk.org/shows/philosophy-retirement. Many of us look forward to retirement, that time in life when we stop working for a living. But what exactly is retirement and why do we retire? Does retirement always mean an end to work, or can it sometimes just mean a shift to a different kind of work? Ought we retire for purely selfish reasons, such as to give ourselves more leisure time? Or ought we retire for the public good, to give younger people greater opportunities for employment? In an age when people are living longer and technology is displacing more and more workers, how should our attitudes about retirement change? The Philosophers coax John Perry out of radio retirement to ask about all the work he's been getting done since stepping away from the mic.

9 MINMAR 29
Comments
446: Philosophy of Retirement

444: Can Speech Kill?

More at www.philosophytalk.org/shows/can-speech-kill. Free speech is one of the core tenets of our democracy. We’re inclined to think that more speech is always better. Although the Supreme Court has outlined some minor restrictions to our right to free speech, the most courts are willing to admit is that speech can lead to violence—it cannot itself do violence. But is it possible for speech to do both? If hate speech is used against a marginalized group, couldn’t the speech act literally do harm? And how does the answer to this question affect our commitment to free speech in a liberal democracy? The Philosophers do no harm with Lynne Tirrell from the University of Connecticut, author of “Genocidal Language Games.” This program was originally broadcast on December 10, 2017.

10 MINMAR 22
Comments
444: Can Speech Kill?

Latest Episodes

502: Comforting Conversations (Part 2)

More at www.philosophytalk.org/shows/comforting-conversations-pt2. In troubling, uncertain times, the arts and humanities are more important than ever. Engaging with works of literature can provide both much needed insight into our current struggles and a sense of perspective in a crisis. In what ways do novels or plays help us come to terms with human suffering? Can fictional narratives about past pandemics shed light on our current situation? And how can storytelling or music help bring us together in isolation? Josh and Ray converse with a range of Stanford faculty members about how philosophy, music, drama, and literature can provide comfort, connection, and a sense of community. • Ge Wang on making music across great distances • Laura Wittman on Alessandro Manzoni's "The Betrothed" • Harry Elam on August Wilson's "Joe Turner's Come and Gone" •Antonia Peacocke on the surprising philosophy of meditation

13 MIN5 d ago
Comments
502: Comforting Conversations (Part 2)

501: Comforting Coversations (Part 1)

More at www.philosophytalk.org/shows/comforting-conversations-pt1. In troubling, uncertain times, the arts and humanities are more important than ever. Engaging with works of literature can provide both much needed insight into our current struggles and a sense of perspective in a crisis. In what ways do novels or plays help us come to terms with human suffering? Can fictional narratives about past pandemics shed light on our current situation? And how can storytelling or music help bring us together in isolation? Josh and Ray converse with a range of Stanford faculty members about how philosophy, music, drama, and literature can provide comfort, connection, and a sense of community. • Lanier Anderson on Albert Camus' The Plague • Michaela Bronstein on narrative and fiction as imaginative tools • Ato Quayson on the social value of oral storytelling

12 MIN1 w ago
Comments
501: Comforting Coversations (Part 1)

459: The Value of Care - Feminism and Ethics

More at www.philosophytalk.org/shows/value-care. We sometimes think of the domains of ethics and morality as divorced from feeling and emotion. You keep your promises because it maximizes good. But what if care were thought of as the bedrock of morality? While we know that more care work is performed by women, would a care-based approach to ethics be feminist, or merely feminine? What would it look like for us to build our institutions around the goal of promoting care? Debra and Ken take care to welcome Joan Tronto from the University of Minnesota, author of "Who Cares?: How to Reshape a Democratic Politics."

11 MIN2 w ago
Comments
459: The Value of Care - Feminism and Ethics

354: Machiavelli

More at www.philosophytalk.org/shows/machiavelli. Niccolò Machiavelli is best known for arguing that people in power should use deception, force, and manipulation if those tactics are necessary to achieve their ends. In an age of unscrupulous politics and ruthless business practice, shouldn't we be encouraging a move away from Machiavellian thinking? Then again, are we even sure that those "Machiavellian" views were really Machiavelli's? If not, what did he really think, and what might we learn from him? John and Ken plot and scheme with Maurizio Viroli from Princeton University, author of "Redeeming the Prince: The Meaning of Machiavelli's Masterpiece."

10 MIN3 w ago
Comments
354: Machiavelli

499: (Why) Money Matters

More at www.philosophytalk.org/shows/why-money-matters. Money, they say, does not buy happiness; but having none can make life extraordinarily hard. Whether we have a little or a lot, we are all familiar with how much money matters in our daily lives. But what exactly is money? Is it a commodity that evolved spontaneously from systems of barter? Or is it purely an invention of government, used as a means to pay off tax liability? What difference would the answer make to things like job creation, inflation, and government spending? And how do modern inventions like cryptocurrency fit into a theory of money? The philosophers go on a spending spree with Graham Hubbs from the University of Idaho, editor of "Pragmatism, Law, and Language."

9 MINAPR 27
Comments
499: (Why) Money Matters

278: Poetry as a Way of Knowing

More at www.philosophytalk.org/shows/poetry-way-knowing. What is poetry? Mere word play? A pretty, or at any rate striking, way of expressing thought and emotion? Or does great poetry involve an approach to the world that provides insight and information not available in other ways? Ken and John explore how poetry can illuminate what we know with award-winning poet Jane Hirshfield, author of "Come, Thief" and other poetic works of philosophical richness.

6 MINAPR 19
Comments
278: Poetry as a Way of Knowing

498: Philosophy and the Superhero

More at www.philosophytalk.org/shows/philosophy-and-superhero. Philosophy is replete with thought experiments featuring characters like Descartes’ “Evil Genius” and Davidson’s “Swampman.” Some of the scenarios philosophers conjure up seem like they could’ve been plucked from a superhero comic. Or is it the other way around? Why do philosophy and superhero comics employ such similar thought experiments? Is there something about the comic book—a medium that is both visual and lexical—that particularly lends itself to philosophical thinking? And what would a philosophy of the superhero look like? The philosophers save the world with Nathaniel Goldberg from Washington and Lee University, co-author of "Superhero Thought Experiments: Comic Book Philosophy."

8 MINAPR 13
Comments
498: Philosophy and the Superhero

447: Fractured Identities

More at www.philosophytalk.org/shows/fractured-identities. Despite tremendous strides made towards civil and political rights in the United States, discrimination and exclusion based on race, class, gender, and sexuality are still pervasive. As a result, individuals seen as "the other" often experience a painful inner fracturing W.E.B. Du Bois called "double consciousness." So, how does one shape a coherent identity in a world where one is considered "other"? What effects do micro aggressions have on the ability to develop a unified self? And what role might community play in helping heal fractured identities? The Philosophers identify with Julie Lythcott-Haims, author of "Real American: A Memoir."

10 MINAPR 5
Comments
447: Fractured Identities

446: Philosophy of Retirement

More at www.philosophytalk.org/shows/philosophy-retirement. Many of us look forward to retirement, that time in life when we stop working for a living. But what exactly is retirement and why do we retire? Does retirement always mean an end to work, or can it sometimes just mean a shift to a different kind of work? Ought we retire for purely selfish reasons, such as to give ourselves more leisure time? Or ought we retire for the public good, to give younger people greater opportunities for employment? In an age when people are living longer and technology is displacing more and more workers, how should our attitudes about retirement change? The Philosophers coax John Perry out of radio retirement to ask about all the work he's been getting done since stepping away from the mic.

9 MINMAR 29
Comments
446: Philosophy of Retirement

444: Can Speech Kill?

More at www.philosophytalk.org/shows/can-speech-kill. Free speech is one of the core tenets of our democracy. We’re inclined to think that more speech is always better. Although the Supreme Court has outlined some minor restrictions to our right to free speech, the most courts are willing to admit is that speech can lead to violence—it cannot itself do violence. But is it possible for speech to do both? If hate speech is used against a marginalized group, couldn’t the speech act literally do harm? And how does the answer to this question affect our commitment to free speech in a liberal democracy? The Philosophers do no harm with Lynne Tirrell from the University of Connecticut, author of “Genocidal Language Games.” This program was originally broadcast on December 10, 2017.

10 MINMAR 22
Comments
444: Can Speech Kill?
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