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The Cinematologists Podcast

The Cinematologists

8
Followers
13
Plays
The Cinematologists Podcast

The Cinematologists Podcast

The Cinematologists

8
Followers
13
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

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About Us

Film academics Dr Dario Llinares and Dr Neil Fox introduce a live screening followed by an audience Q&A. The podcast also features interviews with filmmakers, scholars, writers and actors who debate all aspects of cinema and film culture.

Latest Episodes

(Repost) Ep 6 Goodbye Dragon Inn

To coincide with the Blu Ray (Arrow Films) release of Taiwanese director Tsai Ming-liang's wonderful elegy to the cinema Goodbye Dragon Inn, we are reposting one of our earliest episodes. Associated with what has come to be known a slow cinema, Tsai's subtly observed visual storytelling utilising long shots, intricate framing and editing but with minimalist dialogue, demands an a deep level of attention in the viewer. The empty, dilapidated movie palace at the centre of the story a metaphor for wider rejection of the auditorium experience. Recorded live at Falmouth University, the episode now feels like a bittersweet look back at a time when the status of cinema-going was undoubtedly a topic of lament, but not to the extent that it is now. The episode also features an interview with academic Sarah Atkinson about her book, Beyond The Screen: Emerging Cinema and Engaging Audience - which presents an expanded conceptualization of cinema which encompasses the myriad ways film can be experienced in a digitally networked society where the auditorium is now just one location amongst many in which audiences can encounter and engage with films. Listening back to the audio was also a reminder to us as to how far the podcast has come in the 5 years since we started. There is definitely a rough and ready feel about the audio, but we hope you 'appreciate' that. Goodbye Dragon Inn is released on Blu Ray with Arrow Films on 23rd of November. You can also subscribe toThe Cinematologistson: Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Podchaser We produce an extensive monthly newsletter and bonus/entended content that is available on our Patreon page:https://www.patreon.com/cinematologists. You can become a member for only $2.50. We also really appreciate any reviews you might write about the show (please send us what you have written and we'll mention it) and sharing onSocial Mediais the lifeblood of the podcast so please do that if you enjoy the show. Music Credits: ‘Theme from The Cinematologists’ Written and produced by Gwenno Saunders. Mixed by Rhys Edwards. Drums, bass & guitar by Rhys Edwards. All synths by Gwenno Saunders. Published by Downtown Music Publishing.

82 min6 d ago
Comments
(Repost) Ep 6 Goodbye Dragon Inn

Ep110 - Ang Lee (w/Ellen Cheshire & Francesco Signorello)

On this episode, Dario and Neil delve into the career of Ang Lee. For this discussion, they are joined by writer Ellen Cheshire, a former guest on the show (Ep69, Jane Campion's The Piano), whose new book on Ang Lee prompted this episode. Find out more about Ellen's books (and more importantly buy them!) here. In addition, Neil talks to one of his students, third year undergraduate Francesco Signorello, about the 2003 filmHulk,and its impact both negatively and positively on the now ubiquitous superhero movie landscape. To kick things off, Neil and Dario also touch on Dario's new article for Film-Philosophy, A Cinema for the Ears: Imagining the Audio-Cinematic through Podcasting, which is available to read, open source, here. You can also subscribe to The Cinematologists on: Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Podchaser We produce an extensive monthly newsletter and bonus/entended content that is available on our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/cinematologists. You can beco...

103 min1 w ago
Comments
Ep110 - Ang Lee (w/Ellen Cheshire & Francesco Signorello)

Ep109 Sport Documentaries - w/ Dir. Finlay Pretsell (Time Trial)

Sports films hold formative relevance for both Dario and Neil, and the sports documentary as a sub-genre is the focus and inspiration for a wide-ranging discussion on our latest episode. How does cinema make sport cinematic and what is the difference, for filmmakers and audiences alike, between sports documentary films and watching sports on Television. The episode is structured around an interview with Finlay Pretsell, a former cyclist and director of Time Trial: A Race to the End. On the surface, the film is a biographical account of the final year of cyclist David Millar, as he comes to terms with retirement after a successful but turbulent career. But more than that the film is an immersive experiment in bringing the audience into the physical and psychological experience of pro cycling. Time Trial is available on the BBC Iplayer and we highly recommend you check it out. Discussion of Time Trial offers avenues through which to examine how cinema takes the sport out of the immedi...

127 minOCT 26
Comments
Ep109 Sport Documentaries - w/ Dir. Finlay Pretsell (Time Trial)

Ep108 Walkabout (w/Luc Roeg and Andrew Peirce)

The occasion of Second Sight Film's wonderful 4K release of Nicolas Roeg's debut feature as sole director allowed for a chance to spend some time focusing on a favourite filmmaker of the podcast. Thanks to AIM Publicity we were offered the chance to talk to one of the film's actors, leading British film producer and son of the director, Luc Roeg. Neil spoke to him earlier in the year and that conversation forms the basis of this episode, alongside a chat Neil had with Melbourne based film critic Andrew Peirce on the legacy of the film in Australian film culture. Neil and Dario get into the slippery nature of the film's representational politics and stark, beautiful aesthetic and kick the episode off trying to remain positive in the face of an overwhelmingly bleak period for the global cinema industry. You can also subscribe to The Cinematologists on: Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Podchaser We produce an extensive monthly newsletter and bonus/entended content that is availab...

99 minOCT 12
Comments
Ep108 Walkabout (w/Luc Roeg and Andrew Peirce)

Ep107 Studying Film in 2020 (w/Freya Billington & Dr Catherine Wheatley)

For the second episode of Season 12, the Cinematologists take a customary left turn from the last episode and get into the weeds about what it's like to be embarking on a new academic year in cinema, for teachers and students, undergraduates and those doing PhDs. Neil and Dario are joined by Freya Billington from UWE and Dr Catherine Wheatley from King's College London to talk about practice and theory and their intersections, the realities of life in a blended/online teaching world for users at both ends and the need for hope, reflection and kindness in addition to the usual curiosity and determination. While focused on the teaching of film the episode includes reflections on the social and political moment that are wider than what's going on in film education or even film itself, encompassing as much of the moment we are all in as is possible in an hour-long film podcast chat. There's also a preamble chat that takes in new Blu-ray releases ofThis Gun For Hire(Eureka/MoC) andAfter ...

81 minSEP 25
Comments
Ep107 Studying Film in 2020 (w/Freya Billington & Dr Catherine Wheatley)

Ep106 Peter Bogdanovich and The Great Buster

Season 12 of the Cinematologists is here. And we start with a bang. Episode 106 features an interview with legendary filmmaker Peter Bogdanovich discussing with Dario and Neil his beautifully crafted celebration of one of silent cinema's brightest stars: Buster Keaton. The Great Buster (released on DVD and Blu-ray on Monday 21st) reminds of the genius of Keaton's comedic imagination, covering his early years in vaudeville, his entry into cinema with the string of early two-reeler "gag-fests", the classic feature period in the twenties, and onto his later career where his autonomy was curtailed by the increasingly formulaic nature of the studio system. Throughout, however, even in his later years working in commercials, television, on stage, and in many films that couldn't live up to his talent, flashes of the comedic imagination are apparent along with the incredible physicality and understanding of action in shaping humour. Peter discusses Keaton's legacy in-depth, his influence on...

79 minSEP 18
Comments
Ep106 Peter Bogdanovich and The Great Buster

Ep105 Tokyo Story

The first of our collaborations with the BFI Japan season focuses on what is generally regarded as a masterpiece of cinema: Yasujirö Ozu's Tokyo Story (1953). In many ways, a simple story of grandparents visiting their children in the city, but one that gradually builds on the resentments and disappointments of intergenerational alienation. Dario and Neil discuss the film in terms of its status in 'the canon', its reverence as Ozu's finest work in a prolific career, and as arguably the purest distillation of the auteur's thematic and formal concerns. A masterclass in directorial precision and visual composition that both registers as a distinct piece of cinematic art but equally, immerses the viewer into its film world where situations and character relations play out in subtle but profound ways. Dario and Neil also discuss some of the other films they have watched in the BFI Japan season so far, including Mikio Naruse'sFloating Clouds (1955) and When a Woman Ascends the Stairs (19...

71 minJUL 16
Comments
Ep105 Tokyo Story

Episode 104 Film Editing with Katie Bryer

Katie Bryer is a freelance film editor whose brilliant work on Bruce Lee and the Outlaw, Maiden, and Virunga demonstrates the diverse possibilities of documentary storytelling. In this episode, Katie discusses the development of her craft, working through student shorts, children's television, and for the BBC on Holby City. The gaining of confidence and building of skills and experience in a role, clearly underpins the idea that doing the work, having a complete commitment to one's passion, is the key to 'getting good'. Katie discusses with Dario some of the key elements of editing as fundamental to the filmmaking process: cutting between different types of footage, focusing on character, how to define time and space, and whether one truly finds the film in the edit. Dario and Neil discuss editing in a broader sense, including highlights of some of their favourite films from an editing perspective. The episode also features chat about recently viewed films both new and old including...

89 minJUL 4
Comments
Episode 104 Film Editing with Katie Bryer

Ep103 Sometimes Always Never

Sometimes Always Never is the debut feature film from Liverpool filmmaker, musician and designer Carl Hunter. It marks the latest stage in a collaboration with screenwriter Frank Cottrell-Boyce and stars Bill Nighy, Sam Riley, Alice Lowe, Jenny Agutter and Tim McInerny. The film was released digitally in March, following a successful festival run over the past couple of years, and tells the story of Nighy searching for his long missing son, with Riley as the brother left behind. It’s a moving story, beautifully told and as lockdown got underway, Neil talked with Carl about the film, his filmmaking process and that slippery question ‘what is British cinema?’. Prior to their chat, Carl sent Neil some images - his scrapbook of ideas and some polaroids - that informed the filmmaking process. He has kindly agreed for us to post a couple here, including the one that sold Bill Nighy on the project as discussed on this episode. The conversation is framed by Neil and Dario’s discussion o...

107 minJUN 10
Comments
Ep103 Sometimes Always Never

Ep102 The Uncertain Kingdom

The Uncertain Kingdom is “an anthology of twenty short films for our uncertain times”. The brainchild of producers Isabel Feeer, Georgia Goggin and John Jencks, the anthology is released digitally on June 1st with the hope that the films will “inspire, support and encourage new conversations about our interesting times’. 10 filmmakers were invited to make work for the project, with the other 10 shorts selected from an open submission call that saw over 1000 entries and work curated under narrative, documentary and experimental banners. The aim of the project was to create a snapshot of Britain in 2020, coming from an awareness on the behalf of the producing team that these post-Brexit vote times, were interesting across the political and social spectrum (and all this before a little something called Coronavirus). For this episode, Neil talked to one of the project’s producers John Jencks as well as narrative filmmaker John Wingard (Pavement), documentary filmmakers Alison Hargr...

114 minJUN 1
Comments
Ep102 The Uncertain Kingdom

Latest Episodes

(Repost) Ep 6 Goodbye Dragon Inn

To coincide with the Blu Ray (Arrow Films) release of Taiwanese director Tsai Ming-liang's wonderful elegy to the cinema Goodbye Dragon Inn, we are reposting one of our earliest episodes. Associated with what has come to be known a slow cinema, Tsai's subtly observed visual storytelling utilising long shots, intricate framing and editing but with minimalist dialogue, demands an a deep level of attention in the viewer. The empty, dilapidated movie palace at the centre of the story a metaphor for wider rejection of the auditorium experience. Recorded live at Falmouth University, the episode now feels like a bittersweet look back at a time when the status of cinema-going was undoubtedly a topic of lament, but not to the extent that it is now. The episode also features an interview with academic Sarah Atkinson about her book, Beyond The Screen: Emerging Cinema and Engaging Audience - which presents an expanded conceptualization of cinema which encompasses the myriad ways film can be experienced in a digitally networked society where the auditorium is now just one location amongst many in which audiences can encounter and engage with films. Listening back to the audio was also a reminder to us as to how far the podcast has come in the 5 years since we started. There is definitely a rough and ready feel about the audio, but we hope you 'appreciate' that. Goodbye Dragon Inn is released on Blu Ray with Arrow Films on 23rd of November. You can also subscribe toThe Cinematologistson: Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Podchaser We produce an extensive monthly newsletter and bonus/entended content that is available on our Patreon page:https://www.patreon.com/cinematologists. You can become a member for only $2.50. We also really appreciate any reviews you might write about the show (please send us what you have written and we'll mention it) and sharing onSocial Mediais the lifeblood of the podcast so please do that if you enjoy the show. Music Credits: ‘Theme from The Cinematologists’ Written and produced by Gwenno Saunders. Mixed by Rhys Edwards. Drums, bass & guitar by Rhys Edwards. All synths by Gwenno Saunders. Published by Downtown Music Publishing.

82 min6 d ago
Comments
(Repost) Ep 6 Goodbye Dragon Inn

Ep110 - Ang Lee (w/Ellen Cheshire & Francesco Signorello)

On this episode, Dario and Neil delve into the career of Ang Lee. For this discussion, they are joined by writer Ellen Cheshire, a former guest on the show (Ep69, Jane Campion's The Piano), whose new book on Ang Lee prompted this episode. Find out more about Ellen's books (and more importantly buy them!) here. In addition, Neil talks to one of his students, third year undergraduate Francesco Signorello, about the 2003 filmHulk,and its impact both negatively and positively on the now ubiquitous superhero movie landscape. To kick things off, Neil and Dario also touch on Dario's new article for Film-Philosophy, A Cinema for the Ears: Imagining the Audio-Cinematic through Podcasting, which is available to read, open source, here. You can also subscribe to The Cinematologists on: Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Podchaser We produce an extensive monthly newsletter and bonus/entended content that is available on our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/cinematologists. You can beco...

103 min1 w ago
Comments
Ep110 - Ang Lee (w/Ellen Cheshire & Francesco Signorello)

Ep109 Sport Documentaries - w/ Dir. Finlay Pretsell (Time Trial)

Sports films hold formative relevance for both Dario and Neil, and the sports documentary as a sub-genre is the focus and inspiration for a wide-ranging discussion on our latest episode. How does cinema make sport cinematic and what is the difference, for filmmakers and audiences alike, between sports documentary films and watching sports on Television. The episode is structured around an interview with Finlay Pretsell, a former cyclist and director of Time Trial: A Race to the End. On the surface, the film is a biographical account of the final year of cyclist David Millar, as he comes to terms with retirement after a successful but turbulent career. But more than that the film is an immersive experiment in bringing the audience into the physical and psychological experience of pro cycling. Time Trial is available on the BBC Iplayer and we highly recommend you check it out. Discussion of Time Trial offers avenues through which to examine how cinema takes the sport out of the immedi...

127 minOCT 26
Comments
Ep109 Sport Documentaries - w/ Dir. Finlay Pretsell (Time Trial)

Ep108 Walkabout (w/Luc Roeg and Andrew Peirce)

The occasion of Second Sight Film's wonderful 4K release of Nicolas Roeg's debut feature as sole director allowed for a chance to spend some time focusing on a favourite filmmaker of the podcast. Thanks to AIM Publicity we were offered the chance to talk to one of the film's actors, leading British film producer and son of the director, Luc Roeg. Neil spoke to him earlier in the year and that conversation forms the basis of this episode, alongside a chat Neil had with Melbourne based film critic Andrew Peirce on the legacy of the film in Australian film culture. Neil and Dario get into the slippery nature of the film's representational politics and stark, beautiful aesthetic and kick the episode off trying to remain positive in the face of an overwhelmingly bleak period for the global cinema industry. You can also subscribe to The Cinematologists on: Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Podchaser We produce an extensive monthly newsletter and bonus/entended content that is availab...

99 minOCT 12
Comments
Ep108 Walkabout (w/Luc Roeg and Andrew Peirce)

Ep107 Studying Film in 2020 (w/Freya Billington & Dr Catherine Wheatley)

For the second episode of Season 12, the Cinematologists take a customary left turn from the last episode and get into the weeds about what it's like to be embarking on a new academic year in cinema, for teachers and students, undergraduates and those doing PhDs. Neil and Dario are joined by Freya Billington from UWE and Dr Catherine Wheatley from King's College London to talk about practice and theory and their intersections, the realities of life in a blended/online teaching world for users at both ends and the need for hope, reflection and kindness in addition to the usual curiosity and determination. While focused on the teaching of film the episode includes reflections on the social and political moment that are wider than what's going on in film education or even film itself, encompassing as much of the moment we are all in as is possible in an hour-long film podcast chat. There's also a preamble chat that takes in new Blu-ray releases ofThis Gun For Hire(Eureka/MoC) andAfter ...

81 minSEP 25
Comments
Ep107 Studying Film in 2020 (w/Freya Billington & Dr Catherine Wheatley)

Ep106 Peter Bogdanovich and The Great Buster

Season 12 of the Cinematologists is here. And we start with a bang. Episode 106 features an interview with legendary filmmaker Peter Bogdanovich discussing with Dario and Neil his beautifully crafted celebration of one of silent cinema's brightest stars: Buster Keaton. The Great Buster (released on DVD and Blu-ray on Monday 21st) reminds of the genius of Keaton's comedic imagination, covering his early years in vaudeville, his entry into cinema with the string of early two-reeler "gag-fests", the classic feature period in the twenties, and onto his later career where his autonomy was curtailed by the increasingly formulaic nature of the studio system. Throughout, however, even in his later years working in commercials, television, on stage, and in many films that couldn't live up to his talent, flashes of the comedic imagination are apparent along with the incredible physicality and understanding of action in shaping humour. Peter discusses Keaton's legacy in-depth, his influence on...

79 minSEP 18
Comments
Ep106 Peter Bogdanovich and The Great Buster

Ep105 Tokyo Story

The first of our collaborations with the BFI Japan season focuses on what is generally regarded as a masterpiece of cinema: Yasujirö Ozu's Tokyo Story (1953). In many ways, a simple story of grandparents visiting their children in the city, but one that gradually builds on the resentments and disappointments of intergenerational alienation. Dario and Neil discuss the film in terms of its status in 'the canon', its reverence as Ozu's finest work in a prolific career, and as arguably the purest distillation of the auteur's thematic and formal concerns. A masterclass in directorial precision and visual composition that both registers as a distinct piece of cinematic art but equally, immerses the viewer into its film world where situations and character relations play out in subtle but profound ways. Dario and Neil also discuss some of the other films they have watched in the BFI Japan season so far, including Mikio Naruse'sFloating Clouds (1955) and When a Woman Ascends the Stairs (19...

71 minJUL 16
Comments
Ep105 Tokyo Story

Episode 104 Film Editing with Katie Bryer

Katie Bryer is a freelance film editor whose brilliant work on Bruce Lee and the Outlaw, Maiden, and Virunga demonstrates the diverse possibilities of documentary storytelling. In this episode, Katie discusses the development of her craft, working through student shorts, children's television, and for the BBC on Holby City. The gaining of confidence and building of skills and experience in a role, clearly underpins the idea that doing the work, having a complete commitment to one's passion, is the key to 'getting good'. Katie discusses with Dario some of the key elements of editing as fundamental to the filmmaking process: cutting between different types of footage, focusing on character, how to define time and space, and whether one truly finds the film in the edit. Dario and Neil discuss editing in a broader sense, including highlights of some of their favourite films from an editing perspective. The episode also features chat about recently viewed films both new and old including...

89 minJUL 4
Comments
Episode 104 Film Editing with Katie Bryer

Ep103 Sometimes Always Never

Sometimes Always Never is the debut feature film from Liverpool filmmaker, musician and designer Carl Hunter. It marks the latest stage in a collaboration with screenwriter Frank Cottrell-Boyce and stars Bill Nighy, Sam Riley, Alice Lowe, Jenny Agutter and Tim McInerny. The film was released digitally in March, following a successful festival run over the past couple of years, and tells the story of Nighy searching for his long missing son, with Riley as the brother left behind. It’s a moving story, beautifully told and as lockdown got underway, Neil talked with Carl about the film, his filmmaking process and that slippery question ‘what is British cinema?’. Prior to their chat, Carl sent Neil some images - his scrapbook of ideas and some polaroids - that informed the filmmaking process. He has kindly agreed for us to post a couple here, including the one that sold Bill Nighy on the project as discussed on this episode. The conversation is framed by Neil and Dario’s discussion o...

107 minJUN 10
Comments
Ep103 Sometimes Always Never

Ep102 The Uncertain Kingdom

The Uncertain Kingdom is “an anthology of twenty short films for our uncertain times”. The brainchild of producers Isabel Feeer, Georgia Goggin and John Jencks, the anthology is released digitally on June 1st with the hope that the films will “inspire, support and encourage new conversations about our interesting times’. 10 filmmakers were invited to make work for the project, with the other 10 shorts selected from an open submission call that saw over 1000 entries and work curated under narrative, documentary and experimental banners. The aim of the project was to create a snapshot of Britain in 2020, coming from an awareness on the behalf of the producing team that these post-Brexit vote times, were interesting across the political and social spectrum (and all this before a little something called Coronavirus). For this episode, Neil talked to one of the project’s producers John Jencks as well as narrative filmmaker John Wingard (Pavement), documentary filmmakers Alison Hargr...

114 minJUN 1
Comments
Ep102 The Uncertain Kingdom
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