Himalaya: Listen. Learn. Grow.

4.8K Ratings
Open In App
title

Real Food Real People

Real Food Real People

0
Followers
0
Plays
Real Food Real People

Real Food Real People

Real Food Real People

0
Followers
0
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Details

About Us

On a journey to discover the real stories of the people who grow our food

Latest Episodes

Viridianna Barajas | #040

Despite the nature of her job as an administrator, Viridianna Barajas feels very connected to the food produced at the dairy where she's office manager and HR director. She opens up about her family's heritage of growing and making food

36 min5 d ago
Comments
Viridianna Barajas | #040

Katie Harris | #039

She's been around dairy farming her whole life, and managed to find a life partner who shares her passion for raising animals and producing milk. Katie Harris gives us a look inside life on a real Washington dairy, and the rollercoaster ride that it can be.

43 min1 w ago
Comments
Katie Harris | #039

Blake Carson | #038

Blake Carson:I like to see things grow, I like to make food. I swear my whole life revolves around food prep and all that stuff. Announcer:This is the Real Food Real People Podcast. Dillon Honcoop:My guest on the podcast this week gives me hope for the future, I guess, of growing food, particularly in Western Washington. You’ll see that he has a passion for helping people grow food. He’s an agronomist right out of college. Blake Carson is his name. He works for Skagit Farmers Supply and he’s worked alongside his grandpa for years helping to grow food. So he has that background, that history, he has the experience to know the big challenges, but he also has the vision for the future where he wants to see food grown here that we don’t necessarily grow here anymore, but he knows that we can because he knows that history from working with his grandpa. Dillon Honcoop:Fascinating conversation and really inspiring when you hear that … And Blake is a really soft spoken guy, but he’s super transparent. You can tell this is all very important to him and that he’s thinking about how to make our food system here in our region better. Again, his name is Blake Carson. We had a great chat right in his grandpa’s machine shed. And I know I, for one, really enjoy this conversation this week. My name is Dillon Honcoop. This is the Real Food Real People Podcast, documenting my journeys all over Washington state to get to know the real people behind our food. Dillon Honcoop:So when was it that you got into farming because your folks aren’t in farming, right? Blake Carson:No, my parents aren’t. So my grandpa, he of course has farmed for quite a while and I started raking hay when I was nine years old. So, little nine year old me was out there jumping the clutch and wearing a cowboy hat raking hay. And yeah, I’d pretty much started right about then. Dillon Honcoop:So what kind of farm did your grandpa have at that time? Blake Carson:He had just got out of the peas they’d left in Whatcom County and I think … Yeah, so he was doing about a couple 100 acres of hay where he’s selling it to horse people, feeding it to his replacement heifers, and he also did quite a bit of field corn. So that’s where I dipped my feet into doing a little bit of field work with four wheel drive tractors and whatnot. Dillon Honcoop:Yeah. What had he farmed over the years though? You said he had done peas in the past, what else had he done back in the day? Blake Carson:So years ago, he and his brother they dairied together and they also did peas, sweetcorn, dabble a little bit with some green beans. Then they had their separation and he continued to just do the whole field corn route with other dairies after they quit dairing and just making it work with what he had. Dillon Honcoop:So you’re nine years old, starting to work on the farm. Do you live in town at that time or what? Blake Carson:I lived right down the road from my grandparents farm, so yeah. Dillon Honcoop:Okay. Well, that made it easy then to be right there? Blake Carson:Yep, yep. He’d always come pick me up in his old beer farm truck and I was always excited. I mean, most kids at nine years old, they are pretty excited to go out to the lake or whatever, but I was always itching to get back onto the tractor. Dillon Honcoop:So you caught the farming bug early on- Blake Carson:Absolutely. Dillon Honcoop:… from your grandpa? Blake Carson:Mm-hmm (affirmative).

43 min2 w ago
Comments
Blake Carson | #038

Rosella Mosby | #037

Vegetable farmer Rosella Mosby grows literally tons of local food just minutes from the heart of Seattle. She shares about some big challenges our food system faces to make locally-grown produce more available.

59 min3 w ago
Comments
Rosella Mosby | #037

Kady Porterfield | #036

An unexpected path led Kady Porterfield from her family's California ranch here to Washington state. She has a passion for helping the people behind our food, and shares her dream for her future.

52 minAUG 18
Comments
Kady Porterfield | #036

Steve Pabody | #035

A freak incident almost killed Steve Pabody, completely changing his perspective on how he manages his small farm in Ferndale, WA. Hear how he and his wife started Triple Wren Farms with no farming experience, and grew it into a diverse, thriving operation.

58 minAUG 10
Comments
Steve Pabody | #035

Case VanderMeulen | #034

He grew up in Europe on a small family dairy, but he now runs a large dairy in Eastern Washington. Meet Case VanderMuelen, and hear his story of growth as he demystifies how large dairy farms really work.

59 minAUG 4
Comments
Case VanderMeulen | #034

Andrew Eddie part 2 | #033

Hay farmer Andrew Eddie explains how hay is made in Eastern Washington, and reveals a potential opportunity for this state's huge tech community.

41 minJUL 27
Comments
Andrew Eddie part 2 | #033

Andrew Eddie part 1 | #032

When Andrew Eddie turned 18, he decided he wanted nothing to do with his family's Moses Lake hay farm. But with a few years away from home and a college degree under his belt, he began to see things differently.

48 minJUL 22
Comments
Andrew Eddie part 1 | #032

Bobby Morrison | #031

Dillon Honcoop:Depends on what you’re passionate about and what you want your end goal to be with your food and your health because in the end, that’s what it is. Your food is your health. Announcer:This is the Real Food Real People Podcast. Dillon Honcoop:Welcome back to the podcast. Lately, we’ve talked to a lot of people with meat and beef in particular producing it here in Washington State, raising beef on ranch land, feeding beef, all this kind of stuff, but what about the next step, the person that takes that beef and turns it into something that you and I can buy at the store and cook up or that a chef in a restaurant can cook up? I wanted to talk with one of those people. This week, we talked with Bobby Morrison and it turns out he’s so much more than just that. He is a meat cutter, a butcher at Del Fox Meats in Everett, but he has a background as a cook and a lifelong passion that you’ll hear about for food.Join me as this journey continues. This is the Real Food Real ...

54 minJUL 13
Comments
Bobby Morrison | #031

Latest Episodes

Viridianna Barajas | #040

Despite the nature of her job as an administrator, Viridianna Barajas feels very connected to the food produced at the dairy where she's office manager and HR director. She opens up about her family's heritage of growing and making food

36 min5 d ago
Comments
Viridianna Barajas | #040

Katie Harris | #039

She's been around dairy farming her whole life, and managed to find a life partner who shares her passion for raising animals and producing milk. Katie Harris gives us a look inside life on a real Washington dairy, and the rollercoaster ride that it can be.

43 min1 w ago
Comments
Katie Harris | #039

Blake Carson | #038

Blake Carson:I like to see things grow, I like to make food. I swear my whole life revolves around food prep and all that stuff. Announcer:This is the Real Food Real People Podcast. Dillon Honcoop:My guest on the podcast this week gives me hope for the future, I guess, of growing food, particularly in Western Washington. You’ll see that he has a passion for helping people grow food. He’s an agronomist right out of college. Blake Carson is his name. He works for Skagit Farmers Supply and he’s worked alongside his grandpa for years helping to grow food. So he has that background, that history, he has the experience to know the big challenges, but he also has the vision for the future where he wants to see food grown here that we don’t necessarily grow here anymore, but he knows that we can because he knows that history from working with his grandpa. Dillon Honcoop:Fascinating conversation and really inspiring when you hear that … And Blake is a really soft spoken guy, but he’s super transparent. You can tell this is all very important to him and that he’s thinking about how to make our food system here in our region better. Again, his name is Blake Carson. We had a great chat right in his grandpa’s machine shed. And I know I, for one, really enjoy this conversation this week. My name is Dillon Honcoop. This is the Real Food Real People Podcast, documenting my journeys all over Washington state to get to know the real people behind our food. Dillon Honcoop:So when was it that you got into farming because your folks aren’t in farming, right? Blake Carson:No, my parents aren’t. So my grandpa, he of course has farmed for quite a while and I started raking hay when I was nine years old. So, little nine year old me was out there jumping the clutch and wearing a cowboy hat raking hay. And yeah, I’d pretty much started right about then. Dillon Honcoop:So what kind of farm did your grandpa have at that time? Blake Carson:He had just got out of the peas they’d left in Whatcom County and I think … Yeah, so he was doing about a couple 100 acres of hay where he’s selling it to horse people, feeding it to his replacement heifers, and he also did quite a bit of field corn. So that’s where I dipped my feet into doing a little bit of field work with four wheel drive tractors and whatnot. Dillon Honcoop:Yeah. What had he farmed over the years though? You said he had done peas in the past, what else had he done back in the day? Blake Carson:So years ago, he and his brother they dairied together and they also did peas, sweetcorn, dabble a little bit with some green beans. Then they had their separation and he continued to just do the whole field corn route with other dairies after they quit dairing and just making it work with what he had. Dillon Honcoop:So you’re nine years old, starting to work on the farm. Do you live in town at that time or what? Blake Carson:I lived right down the road from my grandparents farm, so yeah. Dillon Honcoop:Okay. Well, that made it easy then to be right there? Blake Carson:Yep, yep. He’d always come pick me up in his old beer farm truck and I was always excited. I mean, most kids at nine years old, they are pretty excited to go out to the lake or whatever, but I was always itching to get back onto the tractor. Dillon Honcoop:So you caught the farming bug early on- Blake Carson:Absolutely. Dillon Honcoop:… from your grandpa? Blake Carson:Mm-hmm (affirmative).

43 min2 w ago
Comments
Blake Carson | #038

Rosella Mosby | #037

Vegetable farmer Rosella Mosby grows literally tons of local food just minutes from the heart of Seattle. She shares about some big challenges our food system faces to make locally-grown produce more available.

59 min3 w ago
Comments
Rosella Mosby | #037

Kady Porterfield | #036

An unexpected path led Kady Porterfield from her family's California ranch here to Washington state. She has a passion for helping the people behind our food, and shares her dream for her future.

52 minAUG 18
Comments
Kady Porterfield | #036

Steve Pabody | #035

A freak incident almost killed Steve Pabody, completely changing his perspective on how he manages his small farm in Ferndale, WA. Hear how he and his wife started Triple Wren Farms with no farming experience, and grew it into a diverse, thriving operation.

58 minAUG 10
Comments
Steve Pabody | #035

Case VanderMeulen | #034

He grew up in Europe on a small family dairy, but he now runs a large dairy in Eastern Washington. Meet Case VanderMuelen, and hear his story of growth as he demystifies how large dairy farms really work.

59 minAUG 4
Comments
Case VanderMeulen | #034

Andrew Eddie part 2 | #033

Hay farmer Andrew Eddie explains how hay is made in Eastern Washington, and reveals a potential opportunity for this state's huge tech community.

41 minJUL 27
Comments
Andrew Eddie part 2 | #033

Andrew Eddie part 1 | #032

When Andrew Eddie turned 18, he decided he wanted nothing to do with his family's Moses Lake hay farm. But with a few years away from home and a college degree under his belt, he began to see things differently.

48 minJUL 22
Comments
Andrew Eddie part 1 | #032

Bobby Morrison | #031

Dillon Honcoop:Depends on what you’re passionate about and what you want your end goal to be with your food and your health because in the end, that’s what it is. Your food is your health. Announcer:This is the Real Food Real People Podcast. Dillon Honcoop:Welcome back to the podcast. Lately, we’ve talked to a lot of people with meat and beef in particular producing it here in Washington State, raising beef on ranch land, feeding beef, all this kind of stuff, but what about the next step, the person that takes that beef and turns it into something that you and I can buy at the store and cook up or that a chef in a restaurant can cook up? I wanted to talk with one of those people. This week, we talked with Bobby Morrison and it turns out he’s so much more than just that. He is a meat cutter, a butcher at Del Fox Meats in Everett, but he has a background as a cook and a lifelong passion that you’ll hear about for food.Join me as this journey continues. This is the Real Food Real ...

54 minJUL 13
Comments
Bobby Morrison | #031
success toast
Welcome to Himalaya LearningDozens of podcourses featuring over 100 experts are waiting for you.