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Missouri Botanical Garden Orchid Show 2007

Missouri Botanical Garden

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Missouri Botanical Garden Orchid Show 2007

Missouri Botanical Garden Orchid Show 2007

Missouri Botanical Garden

1
Followers
1
Plays
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MBG: Orchid Show 2007

Latest Episodes

12# – Please leave us your feedback.

Voice: Dr. Peter H. Raven, president Thank you for visiting The Art of Orchids. We certainly hope you’ve enjoyed your experience. This audio tour is being offered as a pilot to enhance your visit to the Garden and your feedback will help guide as we strive to improve ways to connect to you, the visitor. When you’re ready, please press the pound key to record comments about your experience, to make suggestions for improvements or to leave questions about something you heard on the tour. When you’ve finished recording, simply press the pound key to save your message and we’ll be listening to it with interest. Thank you very much for leaving your comments. We appreciate your visit.

31 s2006 JAN 1
Comments
12# – Please leave us your feedback.

11# – What else is there to see at the Garden?

Voice: Lisa Brandon, Public Relations Manager I’m Lisa Brandon, Public Relations Manager. After you enjoy the orchid show, stop by our historic Linnean House, outside the Ridgway Center. From now until mid-March, more than 50 different camellias will fill the conservatory with blooms of red, white and pink. Look for the rare, yellow-flowering camellia. This one usually blooms in early March. As you enter the Linnean House, you’ll notice a sweet fragrance - but it’s not the camellias, because they have almost no scent! The delicate fragrance comes from jasmine and olive trees that grow near the entrance. Inside the Climatron, it’s always a warm, comfortable 85 degrees. Escape winter for a while inside this rain forest of rare, fascinating plants, waterfalls and exotic birds. A walk through the Climatron is like a mini-vacation to the tropics! Our Japanese Garden was actually designed to be most beautiful in rain, mist and snow. It’s a view worth bundling up for on a snowy day.

51 s2006 JAN 1
Comments
11# – What else is there to see at the Garden?

10# – Where can orchids be purchased?

Voice: Jan Simons, Vice President of Retail Operations I’m Jan Simons, Vice President of Retail Operations. Stop by the Garden Gate Shop and check out our great selection of potted orchids, and everything you need to grow them. If you’re buying an orchid for the first time, try an easy-to-grow Phalaenopsis. It’s also known as the “moth orchid.” Our prices start as low as $6 for a small seedling. For about $40, you can buy a nice-sized plant in bloom. And remember, proceeds from your purchase support the Garden. Our sales staff can also help you select the correct fertilizer, orchid bark, pots, stakes and tools. When you buy an orchid, you will receive written instructions for the proper plant care.

37 s2006 JAN 1
Comments
10# – Where can orchids be purchased?

9# – Where can I find information on how to grow orchids?

Voice: Bob Vander Linden, volunteer in the orchid range Resources: Kemper Center fact sheets, Plant Doctor I’m Bob Vander Linden, a Master Gardener volunteer in the orchid range. Here at the Garden, you can turn to a number of sources for plant care advice. Stop by the Kemper Center for Home Gardening, where you can use reference materials or ask for handouts on growing and caring for orchids. Call the Horticultural Answering Service on weekday mornings to seek advice from master gardeners. At home, get online and check out the Web site www.gardeninghelp.org. The Garden also offer classes for both novice and experienced orchid gardeners. Our Garden Gate Shop sells plants, orchid care products and lots of gardening books and accessories. Plant society shows and sales at the Garden offer another opportunity to buy orchids, ask questions, and get advice from knowledgeable members. The Orchid Society of St. Louis and the Missouri Orchid Society host shows and sales at the Garden each y...

1 MIN2006 JAN 1
Comments
9# – Where can I find information on how to grow orchids?

8# – Where can orchids be seen throughout the year at the Garden?

Voice: Jenn Wolff, Exhibit and Information Coordinator Hello, I’m Jennifer Wolff, Exhibit and Information Coordinator at the Garden. A portion of our orchid collection is always on display throughout the year. Just inside the Beaumont Room under the atrium, you’ll find a beautiful selection of orchids in bloom. The Beaumont Room is located in the education wing just west of the ticket counter in the Ridgway Center. Also, growing amidst the beauty of the rain forest, a stunning array of orchids can be found near the bamboo bridge just inside the Climatron conservatory. The orchids in these display areas rotate regularly, so you might not see the same one on your next visit to the Garden. During your visit, look for our interpretation cart inside the Ridgway Center, where both the young and young at heart can explore the world of orchids with a Volunteer Interpreter through hands-on, sensory-based materials and activities.

43 s2006 JAN 1
Comments
8# – Where can orchids be seen throughout the year at the Garden?

7# – What are the threats to orchids growing in the wild?

Voice: Dr. Peter H. Raven, president Resources: 2005 Orchid Island brochure If you read the bestseller The Orchid Thief, by Susan Orlean, then you not only would have been highly entertained but you would have learned that since Victorian times, passionate collectors have driven the search for the rarest of orchids. It’s important to remember that individual orchid species which are often very rare are extremely vulnerable to simply being wiped out to be driven to extinction in nature. Wild orchids are often over-collected. Many species are restricted to a specific habitat, such as the branches of a particular kind of tree and many of them with their bizarre and unusual and well adapted flowers depend on a particular kind of visiting animal or pollinator in order to be able to thrive, produce seeds and spread themselves. Since 1975, the international plant trade has been regulated by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species. As president of the Garden, I want to ...

1 MIN2006 JAN 1
Comments
7# – What are the threats to orchids growing in the wild?

6# – Where do orchids originate and how do they grow?

Voice: Dr. Jim Solomon, curator of the herbarium Resource: Talking Orchid script, Bulletin articles, 2005 <#38> 2006 Orchid Show brochures Hi, I’m Dr. Jim Solomon, curator of the herbarium here at the Missouri Botanical Garden. Did you know that orchids are the largest family of flower plants in the world, with some 30 to 35,000 species? That’s approaching nearly 10 percent of all flowering plants! They grow on every continent except Antarctica. While there are only about 200 orchid species in North America the tropical countries have many, many more. For example, there’s more than 3,500 species in Ecuador and more than 1,300 in Costa Rica. Some orchid plants are less than an inch tall with flowers the size of a pinhead, while others grow up to 40 feet tall, with flowers approaching a foot in width. Terrestrial orchids grow on the ground, where their roots absorb moisture and nutrients from the soil with the help of soil fungi. Epiphytic orchids on the other hand grow on tree tru...

1 MIN2006 JAN 1
Comments
6# – Where do orchids originate and how do they grow?

5# – What is the history of the Garden's orchid collection?

Voice: Andrew Colligan, archivist and historian Resources: Public Relations fact sheet, Bulletin articles, Kemper Center handout I’m Andrew Colligan, the Garden’s archivist and historian. The Missouri Botanical Garden has collected, grown and displayed orchids for more than a century. The first specimens were given as a gift to the Garden’s founder, Henry Shaw, in 1876. Mr. Shaw was especially fond of orchids. At his death in 1889, the Garden’s collection, though small at the time, was one of the country’s most complete. The collection grew steadily, and in 1918, the largest public display of orchids ever held in St. Louis made it’s debuted at a Christmas Show. In 1923, George Pring, an orchidologist on the Garden staff, spent six months collecting plants in Panama and Colombia. He returned with eight tons of orchids, including 5,000 Cattleyas. The Garden held its first orchid show the following year, in 1924. Eight-thousand visitors came! In 1926, the Garden set up a tropical...

1 MIN2006 JAN 1
Comments
5# – What is the history of the Garden's orchid collection?

4# – How many orchids are in the Garden's collection?

Voice: Jim Cocos, Vice President of Horticulture Resource: Public Relations fact sheet I’m Jim Cocos, Vice President of Horticulture. This Garden’s orchid collection is one of the largest and finest in the country. We grow more than 8,000 plants in our greenhouse area called the orchid range. These plants make up our largest living collection, representing over 2,500 unique species, varieties and hybrids. We grow a number of rare and unusual specimens. Some of them are over 100 years old. Many of the Cattleya hybrids in this show are no longer commercially available. They were created many years ago, and growers no longer produce them. Our collection emphasizes the types of orchids that can survive St. Louis’s hot summers as well as those that are winter bloomers. Their diverse colors and forms are valuable for our displays and educational exhibits.

37 s2006 JAN 1
Comments
4# – How many orchids are in the Garden's collection?

3# – How are the orchids cared for behind the scenes?

Voice: Babs Wagner I’m Babs Wagner, the horticulturist in charge of the Garden’s orchid collection. Behind the scenes in the greenhouse, we tend thousands of plants. For the orchid show, I display as many different kinds as I can, so you can see the amazing diversity of our collection. The stars of this show are the winter bloomers. To get them ready on time, I juggle the greenhouse temperatures, starting in October. By doing this, I can force the flowers to bloom early or delay their bloom times a little. The variety of orchids you see here will change over six weeks. We start with about 800 orchids. I switch out approximately 50 to 100 as they start to fade each week and replace them with blooming plants from our greenhouses. First thing every morning, I slice off any faded flowers with a sharp razor blade, so everything always looks fresh and perfect. Do you know that vanilla comes from an orchid vine? Our vanilla orchid collection is one of North America’s largest. Look for t...

1 MIN2006 JAN 1
Comments
3# – How are the orchids cared for behind the scenes?

Latest Episodes

12# – Please leave us your feedback.

Voice: Dr. Peter H. Raven, president Thank you for visiting The Art of Orchids. We certainly hope you’ve enjoyed your experience. This audio tour is being offered as a pilot to enhance your visit to the Garden and your feedback will help guide as we strive to improve ways to connect to you, the visitor. When you’re ready, please press the pound key to record comments about your experience, to make suggestions for improvements or to leave questions about something you heard on the tour. When you’ve finished recording, simply press the pound key to save your message and we’ll be listening to it with interest. Thank you very much for leaving your comments. We appreciate your visit.

31 s2006 JAN 1
Comments
12# – Please leave us your feedback.

11# – What else is there to see at the Garden?

Voice: Lisa Brandon, Public Relations Manager I’m Lisa Brandon, Public Relations Manager. After you enjoy the orchid show, stop by our historic Linnean House, outside the Ridgway Center. From now until mid-March, more than 50 different camellias will fill the conservatory with blooms of red, white and pink. Look for the rare, yellow-flowering camellia. This one usually blooms in early March. As you enter the Linnean House, you’ll notice a sweet fragrance - but it’s not the camellias, because they have almost no scent! The delicate fragrance comes from jasmine and olive trees that grow near the entrance. Inside the Climatron, it’s always a warm, comfortable 85 degrees. Escape winter for a while inside this rain forest of rare, fascinating plants, waterfalls and exotic birds. A walk through the Climatron is like a mini-vacation to the tropics! Our Japanese Garden was actually designed to be most beautiful in rain, mist and snow. It’s a view worth bundling up for on a snowy day.

51 s2006 JAN 1
Comments
11# – What else is there to see at the Garden?

10# – Where can orchids be purchased?

Voice: Jan Simons, Vice President of Retail Operations I’m Jan Simons, Vice President of Retail Operations. Stop by the Garden Gate Shop and check out our great selection of potted orchids, and everything you need to grow them. If you’re buying an orchid for the first time, try an easy-to-grow Phalaenopsis. It’s also known as the “moth orchid.” Our prices start as low as $6 for a small seedling. For about $40, you can buy a nice-sized plant in bloom. And remember, proceeds from your purchase support the Garden. Our sales staff can also help you select the correct fertilizer, orchid bark, pots, stakes and tools. When you buy an orchid, you will receive written instructions for the proper plant care.

37 s2006 JAN 1
Comments
10# – Where can orchids be purchased?

9# – Where can I find information on how to grow orchids?

Voice: Bob Vander Linden, volunteer in the orchid range Resources: Kemper Center fact sheets, Plant Doctor I’m Bob Vander Linden, a Master Gardener volunteer in the orchid range. Here at the Garden, you can turn to a number of sources for plant care advice. Stop by the Kemper Center for Home Gardening, where you can use reference materials or ask for handouts on growing and caring for orchids. Call the Horticultural Answering Service on weekday mornings to seek advice from master gardeners. At home, get online and check out the Web site www.gardeninghelp.org. The Garden also offer classes for both novice and experienced orchid gardeners. Our Garden Gate Shop sells plants, orchid care products and lots of gardening books and accessories. Plant society shows and sales at the Garden offer another opportunity to buy orchids, ask questions, and get advice from knowledgeable members. The Orchid Society of St. Louis and the Missouri Orchid Society host shows and sales at the Garden each y...

1 MIN2006 JAN 1
Comments
9# – Where can I find information on how to grow orchids?

8# – Where can orchids be seen throughout the year at the Garden?

Voice: Jenn Wolff, Exhibit and Information Coordinator Hello, I’m Jennifer Wolff, Exhibit and Information Coordinator at the Garden. A portion of our orchid collection is always on display throughout the year. Just inside the Beaumont Room under the atrium, you’ll find a beautiful selection of orchids in bloom. The Beaumont Room is located in the education wing just west of the ticket counter in the Ridgway Center. Also, growing amidst the beauty of the rain forest, a stunning array of orchids can be found near the bamboo bridge just inside the Climatron conservatory. The orchids in these display areas rotate regularly, so you might not see the same one on your next visit to the Garden. During your visit, look for our interpretation cart inside the Ridgway Center, where both the young and young at heart can explore the world of orchids with a Volunteer Interpreter through hands-on, sensory-based materials and activities.

43 s2006 JAN 1
Comments
8# – Where can orchids be seen throughout the year at the Garden?

7# – What are the threats to orchids growing in the wild?

Voice: Dr. Peter H. Raven, president Resources: 2005 Orchid Island brochure If you read the bestseller The Orchid Thief, by Susan Orlean, then you not only would have been highly entertained but you would have learned that since Victorian times, passionate collectors have driven the search for the rarest of orchids. It’s important to remember that individual orchid species which are often very rare are extremely vulnerable to simply being wiped out to be driven to extinction in nature. Wild orchids are often over-collected. Many species are restricted to a specific habitat, such as the branches of a particular kind of tree and many of them with their bizarre and unusual and well adapted flowers depend on a particular kind of visiting animal or pollinator in order to be able to thrive, produce seeds and spread themselves. Since 1975, the international plant trade has been regulated by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species. As president of the Garden, I want to ...

1 MIN2006 JAN 1
Comments
7# – What are the threats to orchids growing in the wild?

6# – Where do orchids originate and how do they grow?

Voice: Dr. Jim Solomon, curator of the herbarium Resource: Talking Orchid script, Bulletin articles, 2005 <#38> 2006 Orchid Show brochures Hi, I’m Dr. Jim Solomon, curator of the herbarium here at the Missouri Botanical Garden. Did you know that orchids are the largest family of flower plants in the world, with some 30 to 35,000 species? That’s approaching nearly 10 percent of all flowering plants! They grow on every continent except Antarctica. While there are only about 200 orchid species in North America the tropical countries have many, many more. For example, there’s more than 3,500 species in Ecuador and more than 1,300 in Costa Rica. Some orchid plants are less than an inch tall with flowers the size of a pinhead, while others grow up to 40 feet tall, with flowers approaching a foot in width. Terrestrial orchids grow on the ground, where their roots absorb moisture and nutrients from the soil with the help of soil fungi. Epiphytic orchids on the other hand grow on tree tru...

1 MIN2006 JAN 1
Comments
6# – Where do orchids originate and how do they grow?

5# – What is the history of the Garden's orchid collection?

Voice: Andrew Colligan, archivist and historian Resources: Public Relations fact sheet, Bulletin articles, Kemper Center handout I’m Andrew Colligan, the Garden’s archivist and historian. The Missouri Botanical Garden has collected, grown and displayed orchids for more than a century. The first specimens were given as a gift to the Garden’s founder, Henry Shaw, in 1876. Mr. Shaw was especially fond of orchids. At his death in 1889, the Garden’s collection, though small at the time, was one of the country’s most complete. The collection grew steadily, and in 1918, the largest public display of orchids ever held in St. Louis made it’s debuted at a Christmas Show. In 1923, George Pring, an orchidologist on the Garden staff, spent six months collecting plants in Panama and Colombia. He returned with eight tons of orchids, including 5,000 Cattleyas. The Garden held its first orchid show the following year, in 1924. Eight-thousand visitors came! In 1926, the Garden set up a tropical...

1 MIN2006 JAN 1
Comments
5# – What is the history of the Garden's orchid collection?

4# – How many orchids are in the Garden's collection?

Voice: Jim Cocos, Vice President of Horticulture Resource: Public Relations fact sheet I’m Jim Cocos, Vice President of Horticulture. This Garden’s orchid collection is one of the largest and finest in the country. We grow more than 8,000 plants in our greenhouse area called the orchid range. These plants make up our largest living collection, representing over 2,500 unique species, varieties and hybrids. We grow a number of rare and unusual specimens. Some of them are over 100 years old. Many of the Cattleya hybrids in this show are no longer commercially available. They were created many years ago, and growers no longer produce them. Our collection emphasizes the types of orchids that can survive St. Louis’s hot summers as well as those that are winter bloomers. Their diverse colors and forms are valuable for our displays and educational exhibits.

37 s2006 JAN 1
Comments
4# – How many orchids are in the Garden's collection?

3# – How are the orchids cared for behind the scenes?

Voice: Babs Wagner I’m Babs Wagner, the horticulturist in charge of the Garden’s orchid collection. Behind the scenes in the greenhouse, we tend thousands of plants. For the orchid show, I display as many different kinds as I can, so you can see the amazing diversity of our collection. The stars of this show are the winter bloomers. To get them ready on time, I juggle the greenhouse temperatures, starting in October. By doing this, I can force the flowers to bloom early or delay their bloom times a little. The variety of orchids you see here will change over six weeks. We start with about 800 orchids. I switch out approximately 50 to 100 as they start to fade each week and replace them with blooming plants from our greenhouses. First thing every morning, I slice off any faded flowers with a sharp razor blade, so everything always looks fresh and perfect. Do you know that vanilla comes from an orchid vine? Our vanilla orchid collection is one of North America’s largest. Look for t...

1 MIN2006 JAN 1
Comments
3# – How are the orchids cared for behind the scenes?
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