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Comparative Social and Cultural History Seminar: Exile

Liesbeth Corens

6
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2
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Comparative Social and Cultural History Seminar: Exile

Comparative Social and Cultural History Seminar: Exile

Liesbeth Corens

6
Followers
2
Plays
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About Us

The Comparative Social and Cultural History Seminar at Cambridge is a fortnightly seminar which has been running for decades. This year's theme is exile, building upon the current interest in the transformative and dynamic nature of dislocation, dispersion, and mobility.

Latest Episodes

Elizabeth Evenden: Printers, exiles, and exchanges between England and Iberia

Elizabeth Evenden discusses the early modern perceptions of historical relations between Britain, Portugal, and Spain.

54 MIN2016 FEB 20
Comments
Elizabeth Evenden: Printers, exiles, and exchanges between England and Iberia

Nicholas Terpstra: Exile, Expulsion, and Religious Refugees: Early Modern Migrations and the Meaning of Reformation

Professor Terpstra calls for an alternative history of the reformation, one which put the concerns with purification, expulsion, and exclusion at its heart. This opens up new avenues and moves the starting date of the reformation from 1517 to 1492.

102 MIN2016 FEB 19
Comments
Nicholas Terpstra: Exile, Expulsion, and Religious Refugees: Early Modern Migrations and the Meaning of Reformation

Roundtable: Exile in/and the Ottoman Empire

Three key scholars working on the Ottoman empire discuss the impact of exile in its history.

115 MIN2016 JAN 21
Comments
Roundtable: Exile in/and the Ottoman Empire

Nil Palabiyik: Byzantine Exiles and Venetian Printers

Nil Palabiyik discusses the presence of Greek scholars and printers in Western Europe which predated and post-dated the best-known exiles after the fall of Constantinople. Historians describe Greeks in Late Humanism primarily in terms of language teachers, yet they were important participants in the scholarly exchanges and were recognised as such.

38 MIN2015 NOV 25
Comments
Nil Palabiyik: Byzantine Exiles and Venetian Printers

Penny Roberts: Adversity and Opportunity in the Huguenot Exile Experience

Professor Roberts explores the role of exile in the French Wars of Religion. Noting that Huguenot exile has primarily been studied for the period post-1685, she highlights how the wider international networks shaped the life and opportunities of French Protestants. Chronology and scale were crucial in shaping the different visibility of the exiles: sixteenth-century exile was more sporadic and in smaller numbers. Yet the many did leave their homes for various periods of time and crossing various distances. Despite small numbers or short time periods, mobility had an impact on the Huguenot community at large. By discussing communication networks which spanned across countries, rather than focusing either on exiles in their host countries, or at the Huguenots at home, Professor Roberts brings to light their significance. Their situation abroad also offered opportunities, as they could act as go-between in those larger networks of correspondence. Studying these go-betweens from various...

51 MIN2015 NOV 13
Comments
Penny Roberts: Adversity and Opportunity in the Huguenot Exile Experience

Marc Saperstein: Aspects of Jewish Exile

Professor Marc Saperstein uses three insightful texts to unravel the complexities of Jewish exile, such the relation between home and diaspora, the diverse negative and positive connotations, the role of locality and personal and the various impact of host countries. talk ends at 54 minutes, followed by Q&A.

113 MIN2015 OCT 28
Comments
Marc Saperstein: Aspects of Jewish Exile

Peter Burke: At the Crossroads: histories of exile, histories of knowledge

Professor Burke offers an historiographical overview of past and current research on exile, and provides insights on his upcoming monograph about exile. Building upon his interest in the history of knowledge, Professor Burke discusses the impact of early modern voluntary and involuntary migration upon the creation of knowledge, with a particular interest in the 'silver lining', to get beyond common perceptions of suffering and hardship. He talks us through the particularities and idiosyncrasies of three specific times and diasporas (1453: the Greek diaspora after the fall of Constantinople; 1492: the Jewish Diaspora after the expulsion from Spain; 1685: the Huguenot diaspora after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes), and also discerns common themes through the key concepts of 'mediation', 'detachment', and 'hybridisation'. The first 42 minutes are Professor Burke's lecture, the last hour are interesting questions and discussion raised by participants. Recording: 13 October 2015.

100 MIN2015 OCT 14
Comments
Peter Burke: At the Crossroads: histories of exile, histories of knowledge
the END

Latest Episodes

Elizabeth Evenden: Printers, exiles, and exchanges between England and Iberia

Elizabeth Evenden discusses the early modern perceptions of historical relations between Britain, Portugal, and Spain.

54 MIN2016 FEB 20
Comments
Elizabeth Evenden: Printers, exiles, and exchanges between England and Iberia

Nicholas Terpstra: Exile, Expulsion, and Religious Refugees: Early Modern Migrations and the Meaning of Reformation

Professor Terpstra calls for an alternative history of the reformation, one which put the concerns with purification, expulsion, and exclusion at its heart. This opens up new avenues and moves the starting date of the reformation from 1517 to 1492.

102 MIN2016 FEB 19
Comments
Nicholas Terpstra: Exile, Expulsion, and Religious Refugees: Early Modern Migrations and the Meaning of Reformation

Roundtable: Exile in/and the Ottoman Empire

Three key scholars working on the Ottoman empire discuss the impact of exile in its history.

115 MIN2016 JAN 21
Comments
Roundtable: Exile in/and the Ottoman Empire

Nil Palabiyik: Byzantine Exiles and Venetian Printers

Nil Palabiyik discusses the presence of Greek scholars and printers in Western Europe which predated and post-dated the best-known exiles after the fall of Constantinople. Historians describe Greeks in Late Humanism primarily in terms of language teachers, yet they were important participants in the scholarly exchanges and were recognised as such.

38 MIN2015 NOV 25
Comments
Nil Palabiyik: Byzantine Exiles and Venetian Printers

Penny Roberts: Adversity and Opportunity in the Huguenot Exile Experience

Professor Roberts explores the role of exile in the French Wars of Religion. Noting that Huguenot exile has primarily been studied for the period post-1685, she highlights how the wider international networks shaped the life and opportunities of French Protestants. Chronology and scale were crucial in shaping the different visibility of the exiles: sixteenth-century exile was more sporadic and in smaller numbers. Yet the many did leave their homes for various periods of time and crossing various distances. Despite small numbers or short time periods, mobility had an impact on the Huguenot community at large. By discussing communication networks which spanned across countries, rather than focusing either on exiles in their host countries, or at the Huguenots at home, Professor Roberts brings to light their significance. Their situation abroad also offered opportunities, as they could act as go-between in those larger networks of correspondence. Studying these go-betweens from various...

51 MIN2015 NOV 13
Comments
Penny Roberts: Adversity and Opportunity in the Huguenot Exile Experience

Marc Saperstein: Aspects of Jewish Exile

Professor Marc Saperstein uses three insightful texts to unravel the complexities of Jewish exile, such the relation between home and diaspora, the diverse negative and positive connotations, the role of locality and personal and the various impact of host countries. talk ends at 54 minutes, followed by Q&A.

113 MIN2015 OCT 28
Comments
Marc Saperstein: Aspects of Jewish Exile

Peter Burke: At the Crossroads: histories of exile, histories of knowledge

Professor Burke offers an historiographical overview of past and current research on exile, and provides insights on his upcoming monograph about exile. Building upon his interest in the history of knowledge, Professor Burke discusses the impact of early modern voluntary and involuntary migration upon the creation of knowledge, with a particular interest in the 'silver lining', to get beyond common perceptions of suffering and hardship. He talks us through the particularities and idiosyncrasies of three specific times and diasporas (1453: the Greek diaspora after the fall of Constantinople; 1492: the Jewish Diaspora after the expulsion from Spain; 1685: the Huguenot diaspora after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes), and also discerns common themes through the key concepts of 'mediation', 'detachment', and 'hybridisation'. The first 42 minutes are Professor Burke's lecture, the last hour are interesting questions and discussion raised by participants. Recording: 13 October 2015.

100 MIN2015 OCT 14
Comments
Peter Burke: At the Crossroads: histories of exile, histories of knowledge
the END
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