title

Juno Beach and Beyond

Juno Beach Centre

5
Followers
5
Plays
Juno Beach and Beyond

Juno Beach and Beyond

Juno Beach Centre

5
Followers
5
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Details

About Us

Juno Beach and Beyond is Canada's first Second World War podcast. Discover Canadian stories from the war that changed the world.

Latest Episodes

Kicking in the Door with Cool Canadian History

In February 1945, the First Canadian Army began its largest battle of the Second World War. Canadian, British, Belgian, Dutch, and American forces struck into the Rhineland, gateway to the Ruhr, Nazi Germany’s industrial heartland. With nearly a half-million Canadian and Allied troops under his command, General Harry Crerar commanded the largest military force ever assembled under a Canadian general. The Battle of the Rhineland, characterized by flooded terrain, muddy roads, cold and damp winter weather, and sometimes fanatical German resistance, lasted a month. Canadian troops suffered 5,300 killed, wounded, and missing before Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery’s forces crossed the Rhine in mid-March 1945. Here Canadian paratroopers participated in their final and most successful combat drop of the war. In less than a month three Canadian soldiers earned the Victoria Cross, the British Commonwealth’s highest award for valour in combat. This is a special crossover episode of Juno B...

31 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Kicking in the Door with Cool Canadian History

Rush to Danger with Ted Barris

For our first episode of 2020 acclaimed storyteller Ted Barris joins us to explore his latest book, Rush to Danger: Medics in the Line of Fire. The book is filled with amazing stories about (mostly) Canadian medical personnel who have served in conflicts over the last 150 years. At the core of the book, Ted explores his father’s experience in the Second World War and shares how the son uncovered the father’s story. Alex Barris, another famous Canadian journalist and broadcaster, was a medic in the US Army during the war. He saw action in the aftermath of the Battle of the Bulge. The first half of the episode covers the story of Alex Barris. The second half of the episode covers the broader experience of medical personnel at war between 1939 and 1945. Then Ted discusses Canadian medical officers during the Dieppe Raid and Jacob Markowitz, whose story was part of the inspiration for the award-winning classic film The Bridge on the River Kwai. Ted Barris’s farther, Alex Barris, in h...

40 MINJAN 15
Comments
Rush to Danger with Ted Barris

Bonus: Remembrance Day 1944 with Matthew Halton

Before we sign off for 2019, we wanted to put together this special bonus episode as a way to thank you all for listening. We hope you’ll share it with your friends and loved ones this Remembrance Day as we remember another Remembrance Day under very different circumstances. The episode includes a CBC Archives recording of Halton’s reflections on Remembrance Day in 1944, as that “hard and cruel war [drew] slowly towards its bitter end.” Halton laments the mass destruction and death of two generations. He notes the terrible duality of war, that “splendid things come out of war, but war is a thing to be ashamed of,” and urges us to “not break the faith.” So far, we haven’t, at least in terms of world war scale, and we’d like to believe that remembrance has something to do with that. We encourage you to listen with an open mind and an open heart. It offers a profound understanding of the meaning of Remembrance Day when the “tides of memory come in.” Enjoy and Lest We Forget...

10 MIN2019 NOV 1
Comments
Bonus: Remembrance Day 1944 with Matthew Halton

The Power of Place with Graham Broad

For the first time, the Juno Beach Centre Fellowship is going to a group of history students. Usually awarded to a single scholar doing research in support of the Centre, the 2020 award will benefit 20 undergraduate students travelling to Canadian battlefields and commemorative sites in Belgium and France. The students are from King’s University College in London, Ontario. They are enrolled in an upper-year course, The World Wars in History, Memory, and Reconciliation, which begins in January and continues in May with the overseas program. The course is designed and led by Professors Graham Broad and Katrina Pasierbek, the latter a King’s alumna and PhD student at Wilfrid Laurier University. For this episode, Professor Broad joins us to discuss his current Second World War research and to give us an overview of the course. We’ll conclude with a fun segment called “Professor Broad Tweets.” Graham is making a name for himself on Twitter with his wit and knowledge about the world ...

53 MIN2019 OCT 18
Comments
The Power of Place with Graham Broad

In Their Footsteps: The Juno75 Student Pilgrimage

Today’s episode is a back-to-school special featuring the Juno75 Student Pilgrimage. This past July, the Juno Beach Centre sponsored a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for high school students from across the country. Two dozen students travelled on a tour of Canadian battlefields of the First and Second World Wars, following in the footsteps of thousands of men and women who came before them. Spearheading the Juno Beach Centre’s first-ever student pilgrimage was Scott Entwistle, our Special Projects Coordinator. Scott organized and led the tour as one of the chaperones. He joins us for the first half of this episode to explain the who, what, where and why of the trip. As back to school beckoned, we interviewed three bright young students about the pilgrimage. In the second half of the podcast, Courtney Decker, Sydney Johnson, and Francesca Lepore answer questions about this unique educational experience. It’s safe to say that the way they look at history has fundamentally changed....

41 MIN2019 SEP 11
Comments
In Their Footsteps: The Juno75 Student Pilgrimage

Bonus: Tiffy Boys with Wally Ward, Doug Gordon & Harry Hardy

Editor’s note: This episode is part two of an episode titled The Typhoon Project. It can be listened to as a stand-alone, but those unfamiliar with Typhoons and their pilots will find the previous episode provides useful context. This bonus episode is called Tiffy Boys. The Tiffy was the common nickname given to the Hawker Typhoon fighter-bomber during the Second World War. Following on our last episode, Tiffy Boys features interviews with three Typhoon pilots who flew during the Battle of Normandy with 440 Squadron RCAF. We’ve organized this episode into three parts. In part one, we have a brief conversation with Walter (Wally) Ward. Our second interview is with Doug Gordon, who, along with Wally, shares his experience as a Typhoon pilot on D-Day. Part three features bonus audio from our conversation with Harry Hardy in the previous episode. Special thanks go to Anne Gafiuk and The Typhoon Project for introducing us to these veterans. Tiffy Boys is dedicated to the memory of Walt...

43 MIN2019 AUG 21
Comments
Bonus: Tiffy Boys with Wally Ward, Doug Gordon & Harry Hardy

The Typhoon Project with Anne Gafiuk and Harry Hardy

Laden with two 500-pound bombs and adorned with black and white invasion stripes, a model of Harry Hardy’s Hawker Typhoon IB “Pulverizer II” hangs proudly in the “Road to Victory” room at the Juno Beach Centre in Courseulles-sur-Mer, France. There is a certain fierceness in its profile, especially looking up into the four-bladed propeller, four 20 mm cannons, and the large under-fuselage chin radiator scoop. This Typhoon is a scale model, but you can begin to understand the fear the “Tiffy” squadrons inspired amongst German troops in Normandy and Northwest Europe. Flight Lieutenant Harry Hardy, DFC was one of six Typhoon pilots who visited the Juno Beach Centre before the 70th anniversary of D-Day and the Battle of Normandy in 2014. He was gracious enough to donate his prized Typhoon model for permanent display. Today’s episode is about The Typhoon Project, a collaboration between a storyteller and a veteran to commemorate Canadians who served in Typhoon squadrons during the...

56 MIN2019 AUG 14
Comments
The Typhoon Project with Anne Gafiuk and Harry Hardy

A Question of Honour with David O’Keefe

Three miles or so south of Caen the present-day tourist, driving down the arrow-straight road that leads to Falaise, sees immediately to his right a rounded hill crowned by farm buildings. If the traveller be Canadian, he would do well to stay the wheels at this point and cast his mind back to the events of 1944; for this apparently insignificant eminence is the Verrières Ridge. Well may the wheat and sugar-beet grow green and lush upon its gentle slopes, for in that now half-forgotten summer the best blood of Canada was freely poured out upon them.C.P. Stacey, The Victory Campaign Seventy-five years ago this summer the Canadian Army was engaged in some of the bloodiest fighting in history. By some estimates, the daily casualty rate in the Battle of Normandy exceeded that of many First World War battles associated with atrocious slaughter — Verdun, the Somme, or Passchendaele. Indeed, Verrières Ridge resembles Vimy Ridge in that both were the sites of bloody clashes featuring Can...

52 MIN2019 JUL 17
Comments
A Question of Honour with David O’Keefe

Captured in Normandy with Amanda Shepherd

Getting ashore on D-Day was one thing, staying ashore was something else. The men who stormed Juno Beach also had to hold it against major German counterattacks in the days ahead. It was a race against time. The Allies needed to build up their forces in Normandy, across 100 miles of English Channel, faster than the Germans could concentrate their forces to push the liberators back into the sea. In the middle of all of this was Rifleman George Carvell of ‘B’ Company, The Royal Winnipeg Rifles. With us to share his story — from the timber mills of New Brunswick to his time in captivity until the end of the war in Europe — is Amanda Shepherd, George Carvell’s great-great niece. Rifleman George Carvell with his sisters Ruth (left) and Thelma (right), courtesy of Amanda Shepherd Time Stamps 2:16 The Timber Man 6:18 Beginnings in the Military 10:05 Training and Integration 13:05 June 6th 1944 16:00 Overrun at Putot-en-Bessin 19:00 Captured (Not Murdered) in Normandy 23:57 Early Capti...

49 MIN2019 JUN 12
Comments
Captured in Normandy with Amanda Shepherd

Canada’s D-Day Story

Seventy-five years ago, Canadians participated in one of the most formative events of the 20th century. The airborne and seaborne landings in Normandy on June 6th 1944 saw American, British, Canadian and other Allied forces return to France to stay for the first time since 1940. D-Day was a great and tragic day. The success of the invasion sparked the liberation of northwest Europe and marked the beginning of the end of Adolf Hitler and Nazi Germany. Canada’s price of victory on that day was high. All figures considered, Canada lost 381 killed, over 584 wounded, and 131 captured on June 6th 1944. Thankfully, projects like Blake Heathcote’s Testaments of Honour and Don Foster’s Legacy of Honour, among others, are hard at work preserving the memories of those who served for present and future generations. Today’s episode, Canada’s D-Day Story, draws on veteran testimonies from these two projects. Canadian veterans take us through their unique D-Day experiences. You’ll also hear ...

59 MIN2019 JUN 5
Comments
Canada’s D-Day Story
the END

Latest Episodes

Kicking in the Door with Cool Canadian History

In February 1945, the First Canadian Army began its largest battle of the Second World War. Canadian, British, Belgian, Dutch, and American forces struck into the Rhineland, gateway to the Ruhr, Nazi Germany’s industrial heartland. With nearly a half-million Canadian and Allied troops under his command, General Harry Crerar commanded the largest military force ever assembled under a Canadian general. The Battle of the Rhineland, characterized by flooded terrain, muddy roads, cold and damp winter weather, and sometimes fanatical German resistance, lasted a month. Canadian troops suffered 5,300 killed, wounded, and missing before Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery’s forces crossed the Rhine in mid-March 1945. Here Canadian paratroopers participated in their final and most successful combat drop of the war. In less than a month three Canadian soldiers earned the Victoria Cross, the British Commonwealth’s highest award for valour in combat. This is a special crossover episode of Juno B...

31 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Kicking in the Door with Cool Canadian History

Rush to Danger with Ted Barris

For our first episode of 2020 acclaimed storyteller Ted Barris joins us to explore his latest book, Rush to Danger: Medics in the Line of Fire. The book is filled with amazing stories about (mostly) Canadian medical personnel who have served in conflicts over the last 150 years. At the core of the book, Ted explores his father’s experience in the Second World War and shares how the son uncovered the father’s story. Alex Barris, another famous Canadian journalist and broadcaster, was a medic in the US Army during the war. He saw action in the aftermath of the Battle of the Bulge. The first half of the episode covers the story of Alex Barris. The second half of the episode covers the broader experience of medical personnel at war between 1939 and 1945. Then Ted discusses Canadian medical officers during the Dieppe Raid and Jacob Markowitz, whose story was part of the inspiration for the award-winning classic film The Bridge on the River Kwai. Ted Barris’s farther, Alex Barris, in h...

40 MINJAN 15
Comments
Rush to Danger with Ted Barris

Bonus: Remembrance Day 1944 with Matthew Halton

Before we sign off for 2019, we wanted to put together this special bonus episode as a way to thank you all for listening. We hope you’ll share it with your friends and loved ones this Remembrance Day as we remember another Remembrance Day under very different circumstances. The episode includes a CBC Archives recording of Halton’s reflections on Remembrance Day in 1944, as that “hard and cruel war [drew] slowly towards its bitter end.” Halton laments the mass destruction and death of two generations. He notes the terrible duality of war, that “splendid things come out of war, but war is a thing to be ashamed of,” and urges us to “not break the faith.” So far, we haven’t, at least in terms of world war scale, and we’d like to believe that remembrance has something to do with that. We encourage you to listen with an open mind and an open heart. It offers a profound understanding of the meaning of Remembrance Day when the “tides of memory come in.” Enjoy and Lest We Forget...

10 MIN2019 NOV 1
Comments
Bonus: Remembrance Day 1944 with Matthew Halton

The Power of Place with Graham Broad

For the first time, the Juno Beach Centre Fellowship is going to a group of history students. Usually awarded to a single scholar doing research in support of the Centre, the 2020 award will benefit 20 undergraduate students travelling to Canadian battlefields and commemorative sites in Belgium and France. The students are from King’s University College in London, Ontario. They are enrolled in an upper-year course, The World Wars in History, Memory, and Reconciliation, which begins in January and continues in May with the overseas program. The course is designed and led by Professors Graham Broad and Katrina Pasierbek, the latter a King’s alumna and PhD student at Wilfrid Laurier University. For this episode, Professor Broad joins us to discuss his current Second World War research and to give us an overview of the course. We’ll conclude with a fun segment called “Professor Broad Tweets.” Graham is making a name for himself on Twitter with his wit and knowledge about the world ...

53 MIN2019 OCT 18
Comments
The Power of Place with Graham Broad

In Their Footsteps: The Juno75 Student Pilgrimage

Today’s episode is a back-to-school special featuring the Juno75 Student Pilgrimage. This past July, the Juno Beach Centre sponsored a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for high school students from across the country. Two dozen students travelled on a tour of Canadian battlefields of the First and Second World Wars, following in the footsteps of thousands of men and women who came before them. Spearheading the Juno Beach Centre’s first-ever student pilgrimage was Scott Entwistle, our Special Projects Coordinator. Scott organized and led the tour as one of the chaperones. He joins us for the first half of this episode to explain the who, what, where and why of the trip. As back to school beckoned, we interviewed three bright young students about the pilgrimage. In the second half of the podcast, Courtney Decker, Sydney Johnson, and Francesca Lepore answer questions about this unique educational experience. It’s safe to say that the way they look at history has fundamentally changed....

41 MIN2019 SEP 11
Comments
In Their Footsteps: The Juno75 Student Pilgrimage

Bonus: Tiffy Boys with Wally Ward, Doug Gordon & Harry Hardy

Editor’s note: This episode is part two of an episode titled The Typhoon Project. It can be listened to as a stand-alone, but those unfamiliar with Typhoons and their pilots will find the previous episode provides useful context. This bonus episode is called Tiffy Boys. The Tiffy was the common nickname given to the Hawker Typhoon fighter-bomber during the Second World War. Following on our last episode, Tiffy Boys features interviews with three Typhoon pilots who flew during the Battle of Normandy with 440 Squadron RCAF. We’ve organized this episode into three parts. In part one, we have a brief conversation with Walter (Wally) Ward. Our second interview is with Doug Gordon, who, along with Wally, shares his experience as a Typhoon pilot on D-Day. Part three features bonus audio from our conversation with Harry Hardy in the previous episode. Special thanks go to Anne Gafiuk and The Typhoon Project for introducing us to these veterans. Tiffy Boys is dedicated to the memory of Walt...

43 MIN2019 AUG 21
Comments
Bonus: Tiffy Boys with Wally Ward, Doug Gordon & Harry Hardy

The Typhoon Project with Anne Gafiuk and Harry Hardy

Laden with two 500-pound bombs and adorned with black and white invasion stripes, a model of Harry Hardy’s Hawker Typhoon IB “Pulverizer II” hangs proudly in the “Road to Victory” room at the Juno Beach Centre in Courseulles-sur-Mer, France. There is a certain fierceness in its profile, especially looking up into the four-bladed propeller, four 20 mm cannons, and the large under-fuselage chin radiator scoop. This Typhoon is a scale model, but you can begin to understand the fear the “Tiffy” squadrons inspired amongst German troops in Normandy and Northwest Europe. Flight Lieutenant Harry Hardy, DFC was one of six Typhoon pilots who visited the Juno Beach Centre before the 70th anniversary of D-Day and the Battle of Normandy in 2014. He was gracious enough to donate his prized Typhoon model for permanent display. Today’s episode is about The Typhoon Project, a collaboration between a storyteller and a veteran to commemorate Canadians who served in Typhoon squadrons during the...

56 MIN2019 AUG 14
Comments
The Typhoon Project with Anne Gafiuk and Harry Hardy

A Question of Honour with David O’Keefe

Three miles or so south of Caen the present-day tourist, driving down the arrow-straight road that leads to Falaise, sees immediately to his right a rounded hill crowned by farm buildings. If the traveller be Canadian, he would do well to stay the wheels at this point and cast his mind back to the events of 1944; for this apparently insignificant eminence is the Verrières Ridge. Well may the wheat and sugar-beet grow green and lush upon its gentle slopes, for in that now half-forgotten summer the best blood of Canada was freely poured out upon them.C.P. Stacey, The Victory Campaign Seventy-five years ago this summer the Canadian Army was engaged in some of the bloodiest fighting in history. By some estimates, the daily casualty rate in the Battle of Normandy exceeded that of many First World War battles associated with atrocious slaughter — Verdun, the Somme, or Passchendaele. Indeed, Verrières Ridge resembles Vimy Ridge in that both were the sites of bloody clashes featuring Can...

52 MIN2019 JUL 17
Comments
A Question of Honour with David O’Keefe

Captured in Normandy with Amanda Shepherd

Getting ashore on D-Day was one thing, staying ashore was something else. The men who stormed Juno Beach also had to hold it against major German counterattacks in the days ahead. It was a race against time. The Allies needed to build up their forces in Normandy, across 100 miles of English Channel, faster than the Germans could concentrate their forces to push the liberators back into the sea. In the middle of all of this was Rifleman George Carvell of ‘B’ Company, The Royal Winnipeg Rifles. With us to share his story — from the timber mills of New Brunswick to his time in captivity until the end of the war in Europe — is Amanda Shepherd, George Carvell’s great-great niece. Rifleman George Carvell with his sisters Ruth (left) and Thelma (right), courtesy of Amanda Shepherd Time Stamps 2:16 The Timber Man 6:18 Beginnings in the Military 10:05 Training and Integration 13:05 June 6th 1944 16:00 Overrun at Putot-en-Bessin 19:00 Captured (Not Murdered) in Normandy 23:57 Early Capti...

49 MIN2019 JUN 12
Comments
Captured in Normandy with Amanda Shepherd

Canada’s D-Day Story

Seventy-five years ago, Canadians participated in one of the most formative events of the 20th century. The airborne and seaborne landings in Normandy on June 6th 1944 saw American, British, Canadian and other Allied forces return to France to stay for the first time since 1940. D-Day was a great and tragic day. The success of the invasion sparked the liberation of northwest Europe and marked the beginning of the end of Adolf Hitler and Nazi Germany. Canada’s price of victory on that day was high. All figures considered, Canada lost 381 killed, over 584 wounded, and 131 captured on June 6th 1944. Thankfully, projects like Blake Heathcote’s Testaments of Honour and Don Foster’s Legacy of Honour, among others, are hard at work preserving the memories of those who served for present and future generations. Today’s episode, Canada’s D-Day Story, draws on veteran testimonies from these two projects. Canadian veterans take us through their unique D-Day experiences. You’ll also hear ...

59 MIN2019 JUN 5
Comments
Canada’s D-Day Story
the END
hmly
himalayaプレミアムへようこそ聴き放題のオーディオブックをお楽しみください。