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South Carolina from A to Z

Walter Edgar

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Followers
7
Plays
South Carolina from A to Z

South Carolina from A to Z

Walter Edgar

8
Followers
7
Plays
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About Us

Historian and author Walter Edgar mines the riches of the South Carolina Encyclopedia to bring you South Carolina from A to Z. Produced by South Carolina Public Radio.

Latest Episodes

"F" is for Farmers’ Alliance

"F" is for Farmers’ Alliance. Organized in Texas in the late 1870s, the National Farmers’ Alliance and Industrial Union, along with its counterpart the Colored Farmers’ National Alliance addressed the problems of debt and depressed commodity prices that confronted much of rural America. The first county Alliance in South Carolina appeared in 1887. By 1890 over one thousand suballiances existed in the state, which claimed more than 80,000 members, black and white. Attempts at various cooperative

1 MIN1 d ago
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"F" is for Farmers’ Alliance

"E" is for Earle, Willie, Lynching of

"E" is for Earle, Willie, lynching of (February 17, 1947). The murder of Willie Earle is believed to be the last racial lynching in South Carolina. Earle, a twenty-six year old African American male was arrested for the robbery and stabbing of a white Greenville taxi driver. A mob abducted Earle from his jail cell in Pickens and drove to the outskirts of Greenville where they lynched him and abused his corpse. Officials at the state and federal levels were quick to condemn the lynching and to

1 MIN2 d ago
Comments
"E" is for Earle, Willie, Lynching of

"D" is for Dabbs, James McBride (1896-1970)

"D" is for Dabbs, James McBride (1896-1970). Writer, teacher, theologian, civil rights leader. Dabbs, a Sumter County native, was a USC graduate. After serving in World War I, he taught English at Carolina and then served as head of the English Department at Coker College. By the early 1930s he had earned a reputation as an essayist as his work appeared in the country’s leading journals. Among the themes he addressed were the distinctiveness of the South, the mixed blessings of industrialization

1 MIN3 d ago
Comments
"D" is for Dabbs, James McBride (1896-1970)

"C" is for Caesars Head State Park

"C" is for Caesars Head State Park. Located in Greenville County near to the border with North Carolina, Caesars Head State Park was established in 1979. In 1996 the park became part of the Mountain Bridge Wilderness Area, which was also includes Jones Gap State Park and Wildcat Wayside. Formed more than 409 million years ago, Caesars Head rises 3,266 feet above sea level on the southern edge of the Blue Ridge Escarpment. It is a granite gneiss formation protruding from the valley as a prominent

1 MIN4 d ago
Comments
"C" is for Caesars Head State Park

"B" is for Babcock, James Woods (1856-1922)

"B" is for Babcock, James Woods (1856-1922). Psychiatrist, mental hospital superintendent. A native of Chester, Babcock was educated at Harvard and studied mental diseases in Europe. In 1891 he became superintendent of the South Carolina Lunatic Asylum in Columbia. He arrived eager to modernize and improve the institution, but insufficient state funding was a perennial problem. Part of the problem was Babcock’s personality. He did, however, get the legislature to change the institution’s name to

1 MIN5 d ago
Comments
"B" is for Babcock, James Woods (1856-1922)

"A" is for Abbeville County

"A" is for Abbeville County (508 square miles; 2010 population 25,328). Abbeville County was one of the six counties created in 1785 out of Ninety Six District. Its border to the north was the pre-Revolutionary War Indian boundary line. The Savannah and Saluda Rivers marked its eastern and western boundaries. Abbeville lost much of its area to Greenwood County in 1897 and gave up further territory in 1916 to McCormick County. Beginning in the 1760s, settlers from Virginia established farms in

1 MIN1 w ago
Comments
"A" is for Abbeville County

"Z" is for Zubly, John Joachim (1724-1781)

"Z" is for Zubly, John Joachim (1724-1781). Minister. A native of Switzerland, Zubly was ordained in London’s German Reformed Church in 1744. He was in South Carolina in the 1740s where he traveled among German communities in the lowcountry and among the German Lutheran community in Orangeburg. Known for his erudition, Zubly occasionally lectured at the Independent Meeting House in Charleston. In 1760, he moved to Savannah. He represented Georgia in the Continental Congress. Although he

1 MIN1 w ago
Comments
"Z" is for Zubly, John Joachim (1724-1781)

“Y” is for Yamassee War (1715-1718). The Yamassee War was a major eighteenth-century conflict betwee

"Y" is for Yamassee War (1715-1718). The Yamassee War was a major eighteenth-century conflict between the colony of Carolina and its trade partners the Yamassee. Unscrupulous Indian traders cheated and mistreated the Native Americans. On Good Friday 1715, the Yamassees struck. They killed the traders in their midst and launched attacks against coastal plantations. Despite its name, the Yamassee War also involved the Cherokees, the Creeks, the Choctaws, the Santees, and the Waccamaws in a far

1 MIN1 w ago
Comments
“Y” is for Yamassee War (1715-1718). The Yamassee War was a major eighteenth-century conflict betwee

"X" is for XYZ Affair

"X" is for XYZ Affair. Charles Cotesworth Pinckney was one of three Americans sent to France to try to improve diplomatic relations. The French foreign minister was originally cordial to the three men, but refused to negotiate with them in any official capacity. Instead, he sent unofficial envoys to meet with the Americans. They made it perfectly clear that the French government expected a bribe in return for improved relations. Pinckney is claimed to have responded to the bribery demands with

1 MIN1 w ago
Comments
"X" is for XYZ Affair

"W" is for Waccamaw River

“W” is for Waccamaw River. The Waccamaw River, named for the Waccamaw Indian nation, begins in North Carolina. The river runs parallel to the coast through Horry and Georgetown Counties—never straying more than fifteen miles from the Atlantic Ocean. In Horry County the river runs through the county seat of Conway. The Waccamaw is navigable from Georgetown to Conway, but the upper reaches become shallow and swampy. From its mouth at Winyah Bay to the end of its tidal influence, the river once

1 MIN1 w ago
Comments
"W" is for Waccamaw River

Latest Episodes

"F" is for Farmers’ Alliance

"F" is for Farmers’ Alliance. Organized in Texas in the late 1870s, the National Farmers’ Alliance and Industrial Union, along with its counterpart the Colored Farmers’ National Alliance addressed the problems of debt and depressed commodity prices that confronted much of rural America. The first county Alliance in South Carolina appeared in 1887. By 1890 over one thousand suballiances existed in the state, which claimed more than 80,000 members, black and white. Attempts at various cooperative

1 MIN1 d ago
Comments
"F" is for Farmers’ Alliance

"E" is for Earle, Willie, Lynching of

"E" is for Earle, Willie, lynching of (February 17, 1947). The murder of Willie Earle is believed to be the last racial lynching in South Carolina. Earle, a twenty-six year old African American male was arrested for the robbery and stabbing of a white Greenville taxi driver. A mob abducted Earle from his jail cell in Pickens and drove to the outskirts of Greenville where they lynched him and abused his corpse. Officials at the state and federal levels were quick to condemn the lynching and to

1 MIN2 d ago
Comments
"E" is for Earle, Willie, Lynching of

"D" is for Dabbs, James McBride (1896-1970)

"D" is for Dabbs, James McBride (1896-1970). Writer, teacher, theologian, civil rights leader. Dabbs, a Sumter County native, was a USC graduate. After serving in World War I, he taught English at Carolina and then served as head of the English Department at Coker College. By the early 1930s he had earned a reputation as an essayist as his work appeared in the country’s leading journals. Among the themes he addressed were the distinctiveness of the South, the mixed blessings of industrialization

1 MIN3 d ago
Comments
"D" is for Dabbs, James McBride (1896-1970)

"C" is for Caesars Head State Park

"C" is for Caesars Head State Park. Located in Greenville County near to the border with North Carolina, Caesars Head State Park was established in 1979. In 1996 the park became part of the Mountain Bridge Wilderness Area, which was also includes Jones Gap State Park and Wildcat Wayside. Formed more than 409 million years ago, Caesars Head rises 3,266 feet above sea level on the southern edge of the Blue Ridge Escarpment. It is a granite gneiss formation protruding from the valley as a prominent

1 MIN4 d ago
Comments
"C" is for Caesars Head State Park

"B" is for Babcock, James Woods (1856-1922)

"B" is for Babcock, James Woods (1856-1922). Psychiatrist, mental hospital superintendent. A native of Chester, Babcock was educated at Harvard and studied mental diseases in Europe. In 1891 he became superintendent of the South Carolina Lunatic Asylum in Columbia. He arrived eager to modernize and improve the institution, but insufficient state funding was a perennial problem. Part of the problem was Babcock’s personality. He did, however, get the legislature to change the institution’s name to

1 MIN5 d ago
Comments
"B" is for Babcock, James Woods (1856-1922)

"A" is for Abbeville County

"A" is for Abbeville County (508 square miles; 2010 population 25,328). Abbeville County was one of the six counties created in 1785 out of Ninety Six District. Its border to the north was the pre-Revolutionary War Indian boundary line. The Savannah and Saluda Rivers marked its eastern and western boundaries. Abbeville lost much of its area to Greenwood County in 1897 and gave up further territory in 1916 to McCormick County. Beginning in the 1760s, settlers from Virginia established farms in

1 MIN1 w ago
Comments
"A" is for Abbeville County

"Z" is for Zubly, John Joachim (1724-1781)

"Z" is for Zubly, John Joachim (1724-1781). Minister. A native of Switzerland, Zubly was ordained in London’s German Reformed Church in 1744. He was in South Carolina in the 1740s where he traveled among German communities in the lowcountry and among the German Lutheran community in Orangeburg. Known for his erudition, Zubly occasionally lectured at the Independent Meeting House in Charleston. In 1760, he moved to Savannah. He represented Georgia in the Continental Congress. Although he

1 MIN1 w ago
Comments
"Z" is for Zubly, John Joachim (1724-1781)

“Y” is for Yamassee War (1715-1718). The Yamassee War was a major eighteenth-century conflict betwee

"Y" is for Yamassee War (1715-1718). The Yamassee War was a major eighteenth-century conflict between the colony of Carolina and its trade partners the Yamassee. Unscrupulous Indian traders cheated and mistreated the Native Americans. On Good Friday 1715, the Yamassees struck. They killed the traders in their midst and launched attacks against coastal plantations. Despite its name, the Yamassee War also involved the Cherokees, the Creeks, the Choctaws, the Santees, and the Waccamaws in a far

1 MIN1 w ago
Comments
“Y” is for Yamassee War (1715-1718). The Yamassee War was a major eighteenth-century conflict betwee

"X" is for XYZ Affair

"X" is for XYZ Affair. Charles Cotesworth Pinckney was one of three Americans sent to France to try to improve diplomatic relations. The French foreign minister was originally cordial to the three men, but refused to negotiate with them in any official capacity. Instead, he sent unofficial envoys to meet with the Americans. They made it perfectly clear that the French government expected a bribe in return for improved relations. Pinckney is claimed to have responded to the bribery demands with

1 MIN1 w ago
Comments
"X" is for XYZ Affair

"W" is for Waccamaw River

“W” is for Waccamaw River. The Waccamaw River, named for the Waccamaw Indian nation, begins in North Carolina. The river runs parallel to the coast through Horry and Georgetown Counties—never straying more than fifteen miles from the Atlantic Ocean. In Horry County the river runs through the county seat of Conway. The Waccamaw is navigable from Georgetown to Conway, but the upper reaches become shallow and swampy. From its mouth at Winyah Bay to the end of its tidal influence, the river once

1 MIN1 w ago
Comments
"W" is for Waccamaw River
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