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The Visual Past

Ottoman History Podcast

5
Followers
24
Plays
The Visual Past

The Visual Past

Ottoman History Podcast

5
Followers
24
Plays
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About Us

visual approaches to the history of the Ottoman Empire and beyond

Latest Episodes

Erken Modern Avrupa Oyunlarındaki Türk İmgesi

Bölüm 460 Fatih Parlak Sunucu:Can Gümüş Erken modern dönemde Avrupa’nın oyun dünyası nasıldı? Avrupa’nın çeşitli ülkelerinde üretilen bu oyunlarda Türkler nasıl temsil ediliyordu? Bu bölümde, Dr. Fatih Parlak ile bu sorular etrafında sohbet ediyoruz. Parlak’ın doktora tezi batılı kaynaklarda yer alan Türk imgesini durağan kabul eden ana akım yaklaşımları yeniden değerlendiriyor ve bu imgenin çok katmanlı ve çok yönlü olarak değerlendirilmesi gerektiğine vurgu yapıyor. Aynı zamanda, oyunları incelemenin açtığı yeni araştırma imkânlarını da tartışıyor. « Click for More »

-1 sAPR 20
Comments
Erken Modern Avrupa Oyunlarındaki Türk İmgesi

Ottomans, Orientalists, and 19th-Century Visual Culture

Episode 445 with Mary Roberts hosted by Zeinab Azarbadegan Download the podcast Feed|iTunes|GooglePlay|SoundCloud The line between Orientalist and Ottoman painting might at first seem clear. But in this episode, historian Mary Roberts argues that such distinctions are in fact complicated, drawing on her recent bookIstanbul Exchanges: Ottomans, Orientalists and Nineteenth-Century Visual Culture. She explains how Istanbul became a global center of production, circulation, and exhibition of visual culture in the nineteenth century. Ottomans and Orientalists both contended and connected with each other--whether in Pera or in the palace--and Roberts discusses how these networks of patronage and apprenticeship eventually led to works that were produced in Istanbul ending up all around the world. There they became defined as Orientalist, but Roberts unearths the more tangled genealogy of their production, as well as the relevance of audience in these characterizations. « Click for More »

57 MINJAN 19
Comments
Ottomans, Orientalists, and 19th-Century Visual Culture

Survivor Objects and the Lost World of Ottoman Armenians

Episode 407 with Heghnar Watenpaughhosted by Emily Neumeier Download the podcast Feed|iTunes|GooglePlay|SoundCloud The genre of biography usually applies to people, but could a similar approach be applied to an object? Can a thing have a life of its own? In this episode, Heghnar Watenpaugh explores this question by tracing the long journey of the Zeytun Gospels, a famous illuminated manuscript considered to be a masterpiece of medieval Armenian art. Protected for centuries in a remote church in eastern Anatolia, the sacred book traveled with the waves of people displaced by the Armenian genocide. Passed from hand to hand, caught in the chaos of the First World War, it was divided in two. Decades later, the manuscript found its way to the Republic of Armenia, while its missing eight pages came to the Getty Museum in LA. In this interview, we discuss how the Zeytun Gospels could be understood as a "survivor object," contributing to current discussions about the destruction of cultural...

48 MIN2019 MAR 25
Comments
Survivor Objects and the Lost World of Ottoman Armenians

Forging Islamic Science

Episode 400 with Nir Shafirhosted by Suzie Ferguson Download the podcastFeed|iTunes|GooglePlay|SoundCloud In this episode, Nir Shafir talks about the problem of "fake minatures" of Islamic science: small paintings that look old, but are actually contemporary productions. As these images circulate in museums, on book covers, and on the internet, they tell us more about what we want "Islamic science" to be than what it actually was. That, Nir tells us, is a lost opportunity. « Click for More »

32 MIN2019 FEB 2
Comments
Forging Islamic Science

Orientalism in the Ottoman Empire

Episode 399 with Zeynep Çelikhosted by Zeinab Azarbadegan and Matthew Ghazarian Download the podcastFeed|iTunes|GooglePlay|SoundCloud How did the Ottomans react to European attitudes and depictions of their own lands? Pondering on the groundbreaking book 'Orientalism' by Edward Said forty years after its publication, our guest Zeynep Çelik discusses the ways in which urban, art, and architectural historians have grappled with representations of the Ottomans by Europeans and representations of Ottomans by Ottomans themselves. Telling us about a number of paintings, monuments, scholarly writings and stories, she argues that Orientalism is still relevant and with us wherever we go. « Click for More »

35 MIN2019 JAN 26
Comments
Orientalism in the Ottoman Empire

The Incredible Life of Antoine Köpe

Episode 387 with Nefin Dinçhosted by Chris Gratien Download the podcast Feed|iTunes|GooglePlay|SoundCloud Antoine Köpe was never a prominent politician or public figure, but he was witness to extraordinary events. Born in late Ottoman Istanbul to French and Hungarian parents, Antoine was there to celebrate the 1908 Young Turk revolution, fight in the First World War, live under an Allied occupation, and experience the emergence of the national resistance and the establishment of the Republic of Turkey. Driven by an irresistible instinct to document, he produced writings, drawings, audiovisual recordings, and a 10-volume memoir of his unusual life. In this episode, our guest filmmaker Nefin Dinç shared more about the life of Antoine Köpe, which is the subject of a documentary project titled "Antoine the Fortunate." « Click for More »

17 MIN2018 OCT 21
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The Incredible Life of Antoine Köpe

The Gardens of Mughal Kashmir

Episode 346 with Jan Haenraetshosted by Nir Shafir and Polina Ivanova Download the podcast Feed|iTunes|GooglePlay|SoundCloud Over the course of the seventeenth century, Kashmir became a valley adorned with gardens as Mughal emperors and nobles built garden after garden across the valley floor and mountainous landscape. In this episode, we speak with landscape architect and preservation specialist Jan Haenaerts on his research into the history of these gardens. We discuss not only their historical formation and usage of these spaces but also how they differed from the more well known Mughal gardens surrounding the Taj Mahal and Humayun's tomb. In the second half of the episode we also explore the difficulty of conserving historical gardens and landscapes in general and how this occurs in conflict areas such as Kashmir. « Click for More »

54 MIN2018 FEB 12
Comments
The Gardens of Mughal Kashmir

Visual Sources in Late Ottoman History

Episode 327 with contributions by Zeynep Çelik, Leyla Amzi-Erdoğdular, Özde Çeliktemel-Thomen, Mehmet Kentel, Michael Talbot, Murat Yıldız, Burçak Özlüdil Altın, Seçil Yılmaz, Burçin Çakır, Zeinab Azerbadegan, Dotan Halevy, Chris Gratien, and Michael Ferguson Download the podcastFeed|iTunes|GooglePlay|SoundCloud Visual sources such as photographs, maps, and miniatures often serve as accompaniment or adornment within works of Ottoman history. In this episode, we feature new work that interrogates methods of analyzing and employing visual sources for Ottoman history that go beyond the practice of "image as decoration." Following a conversation with the organizers of the "Visual Sources in Late Ottoman History" conference held at Columbia University in April 2017, we speak to conference participants about the visual sources they employ in their work and how these visual sources allow us to understand the history of the Ottoman Empire and post-Ottoman world in a new light...

-1 s2017 JUL 25
Comments
Visual Sources in Late Ottoman History

Everyday Life and History in Ottoman Illustrated Journals

Episode 309 with Ahmet Ersoyhosted by Susanna Ferguson Download the podcastFeed|iTunes|GooglePlay|SoundCloud Photography came to the Ottoman empire almost as soon as it was invented in Europe. Over subsequent decades, however, techniques improved, cameras got cheaper and more portable, and photographic production, circulation, and collection in Ottoman lands moved outside of the rarefied circles of the elite studios and the state. In this episode, Ahmet Ersoy discusses one of the main media for this kind of vernacular photography--the illustrated journals of the late Ottoman empire. What can understanding the circulation of images in this form help us to understand about history, identity, and print culture in the late Ottoman Empire, as well as about how to study photography itself? « Click for More »

-1 s2017 MAR 30
Comments
Everyday Life and History in Ottoman Illustrated Journals

Alevi Religious Ceremony, Architecture, and Practice

Episode 299 with Angela Andersenhosted by Chris Gratien and Shireen Hamza Download the podcastFeed|iTunes|GooglePlay|SoundCloud In this episode, we approach the religious architecture of the Alevis, to examine how practice shapes architectural space and how socioeconomic change transforms such spaces. Many of our episodes on Ottoman History Podcast have focused on how monumental architecture, such as mosques and other buildings of religious significance, are tied to political transformation and expressions of political power and ideology. Taking a different perspective, our guest, Angela Andersen, researches the history and development of Alevi architectural forms in Turkey and abroad. Historically, Alevi religious practice and cem ceremonies took place in homes and other multi-purpose buildings, which could be configured as ad hoc meeting places for local communities during the communal cem ceremony. But with Alevi urban migration to cities in Turkey, Germany, and elsewhere, the cr...

-1 s2017 FEB 14
Comments
Alevi Religious Ceremony, Architecture, and Practice

Latest Episodes

Erken Modern Avrupa Oyunlarındaki Türk İmgesi

Bölüm 460 Fatih Parlak Sunucu:Can Gümüş Erken modern dönemde Avrupa’nın oyun dünyası nasıldı? Avrupa’nın çeşitli ülkelerinde üretilen bu oyunlarda Türkler nasıl temsil ediliyordu? Bu bölümde, Dr. Fatih Parlak ile bu sorular etrafında sohbet ediyoruz. Parlak’ın doktora tezi batılı kaynaklarda yer alan Türk imgesini durağan kabul eden ana akım yaklaşımları yeniden değerlendiriyor ve bu imgenin çok katmanlı ve çok yönlü olarak değerlendirilmesi gerektiğine vurgu yapıyor. Aynı zamanda, oyunları incelemenin açtığı yeni araştırma imkânlarını da tartışıyor. « Click for More »

-1 sAPR 20
Comments
Erken Modern Avrupa Oyunlarındaki Türk İmgesi

Ottomans, Orientalists, and 19th-Century Visual Culture

Episode 445 with Mary Roberts hosted by Zeinab Azarbadegan Download the podcast Feed|iTunes|GooglePlay|SoundCloud The line between Orientalist and Ottoman painting might at first seem clear. But in this episode, historian Mary Roberts argues that such distinctions are in fact complicated, drawing on her recent bookIstanbul Exchanges: Ottomans, Orientalists and Nineteenth-Century Visual Culture. She explains how Istanbul became a global center of production, circulation, and exhibition of visual culture in the nineteenth century. Ottomans and Orientalists both contended and connected with each other--whether in Pera or in the palace--and Roberts discusses how these networks of patronage and apprenticeship eventually led to works that were produced in Istanbul ending up all around the world. There they became defined as Orientalist, but Roberts unearths the more tangled genealogy of their production, as well as the relevance of audience in these characterizations. « Click for More »

57 MINJAN 19
Comments
Ottomans, Orientalists, and 19th-Century Visual Culture

Survivor Objects and the Lost World of Ottoman Armenians

Episode 407 with Heghnar Watenpaughhosted by Emily Neumeier Download the podcast Feed|iTunes|GooglePlay|SoundCloud The genre of biography usually applies to people, but could a similar approach be applied to an object? Can a thing have a life of its own? In this episode, Heghnar Watenpaugh explores this question by tracing the long journey of the Zeytun Gospels, a famous illuminated manuscript considered to be a masterpiece of medieval Armenian art. Protected for centuries in a remote church in eastern Anatolia, the sacred book traveled with the waves of people displaced by the Armenian genocide. Passed from hand to hand, caught in the chaos of the First World War, it was divided in two. Decades later, the manuscript found its way to the Republic of Armenia, while its missing eight pages came to the Getty Museum in LA. In this interview, we discuss how the Zeytun Gospels could be understood as a "survivor object," contributing to current discussions about the destruction of cultural...

48 MIN2019 MAR 25
Comments
Survivor Objects and the Lost World of Ottoman Armenians

Forging Islamic Science

Episode 400 with Nir Shafirhosted by Suzie Ferguson Download the podcastFeed|iTunes|GooglePlay|SoundCloud In this episode, Nir Shafir talks about the problem of "fake minatures" of Islamic science: small paintings that look old, but are actually contemporary productions. As these images circulate in museums, on book covers, and on the internet, they tell us more about what we want "Islamic science" to be than what it actually was. That, Nir tells us, is a lost opportunity. « Click for More »

32 MIN2019 FEB 2
Comments
Forging Islamic Science

Orientalism in the Ottoman Empire

Episode 399 with Zeynep Çelikhosted by Zeinab Azarbadegan and Matthew Ghazarian Download the podcastFeed|iTunes|GooglePlay|SoundCloud How did the Ottomans react to European attitudes and depictions of their own lands? Pondering on the groundbreaking book 'Orientalism' by Edward Said forty years after its publication, our guest Zeynep Çelik discusses the ways in which urban, art, and architectural historians have grappled with representations of the Ottomans by Europeans and representations of Ottomans by Ottomans themselves. Telling us about a number of paintings, monuments, scholarly writings and stories, she argues that Orientalism is still relevant and with us wherever we go. « Click for More »

35 MIN2019 JAN 26
Comments
Orientalism in the Ottoman Empire

The Incredible Life of Antoine Köpe

Episode 387 with Nefin Dinçhosted by Chris Gratien Download the podcast Feed|iTunes|GooglePlay|SoundCloud Antoine Köpe was never a prominent politician or public figure, but he was witness to extraordinary events. Born in late Ottoman Istanbul to French and Hungarian parents, Antoine was there to celebrate the 1908 Young Turk revolution, fight in the First World War, live under an Allied occupation, and experience the emergence of the national resistance and the establishment of the Republic of Turkey. Driven by an irresistible instinct to document, he produced writings, drawings, audiovisual recordings, and a 10-volume memoir of his unusual life. In this episode, our guest filmmaker Nefin Dinç shared more about the life of Antoine Köpe, which is the subject of a documentary project titled "Antoine the Fortunate." « Click for More »

17 MIN2018 OCT 21
Comments
The Incredible Life of Antoine Köpe

The Gardens of Mughal Kashmir

Episode 346 with Jan Haenraetshosted by Nir Shafir and Polina Ivanova Download the podcast Feed|iTunes|GooglePlay|SoundCloud Over the course of the seventeenth century, Kashmir became a valley adorned with gardens as Mughal emperors and nobles built garden after garden across the valley floor and mountainous landscape. In this episode, we speak with landscape architect and preservation specialist Jan Haenaerts on his research into the history of these gardens. We discuss not only their historical formation and usage of these spaces but also how they differed from the more well known Mughal gardens surrounding the Taj Mahal and Humayun's tomb. In the second half of the episode we also explore the difficulty of conserving historical gardens and landscapes in general and how this occurs in conflict areas such as Kashmir. « Click for More »

54 MIN2018 FEB 12
Comments
The Gardens of Mughal Kashmir

Visual Sources in Late Ottoman History

Episode 327 with contributions by Zeynep Çelik, Leyla Amzi-Erdoğdular, Özde Çeliktemel-Thomen, Mehmet Kentel, Michael Talbot, Murat Yıldız, Burçak Özlüdil Altın, Seçil Yılmaz, Burçin Çakır, Zeinab Azerbadegan, Dotan Halevy, Chris Gratien, and Michael Ferguson Download the podcastFeed|iTunes|GooglePlay|SoundCloud Visual sources such as photographs, maps, and miniatures often serve as accompaniment or adornment within works of Ottoman history. In this episode, we feature new work that interrogates methods of analyzing and employing visual sources for Ottoman history that go beyond the practice of "image as decoration." Following a conversation with the organizers of the "Visual Sources in Late Ottoman History" conference held at Columbia University in April 2017, we speak to conference participants about the visual sources they employ in their work and how these visual sources allow us to understand the history of the Ottoman Empire and post-Ottoman world in a new light...

-1 s2017 JUL 25
Comments
Visual Sources in Late Ottoman History

Everyday Life and History in Ottoman Illustrated Journals

Episode 309 with Ahmet Ersoyhosted by Susanna Ferguson Download the podcastFeed|iTunes|GooglePlay|SoundCloud Photography came to the Ottoman empire almost as soon as it was invented in Europe. Over subsequent decades, however, techniques improved, cameras got cheaper and more portable, and photographic production, circulation, and collection in Ottoman lands moved outside of the rarefied circles of the elite studios and the state. In this episode, Ahmet Ersoy discusses one of the main media for this kind of vernacular photography--the illustrated journals of the late Ottoman empire. What can understanding the circulation of images in this form help us to understand about history, identity, and print culture in the late Ottoman Empire, as well as about how to study photography itself? « Click for More »

-1 s2017 MAR 30
Comments
Everyday Life and History in Ottoman Illustrated Journals

Alevi Religious Ceremony, Architecture, and Practice

Episode 299 with Angela Andersenhosted by Chris Gratien and Shireen Hamza Download the podcastFeed|iTunes|GooglePlay|SoundCloud In this episode, we approach the religious architecture of the Alevis, to examine how practice shapes architectural space and how socioeconomic change transforms such spaces. Many of our episodes on Ottoman History Podcast have focused on how monumental architecture, such as mosques and other buildings of religious significance, are tied to political transformation and expressions of political power and ideology. Taking a different perspective, our guest, Angela Andersen, researches the history and development of Alevi architectural forms in Turkey and abroad. Historically, Alevi religious practice and cem ceremonies took place in homes and other multi-purpose buildings, which could be configured as ad hoc meeting places for local communities during the communal cem ceremony. But with Alevi urban migration to cities in Turkey, Germany, and elsewhere, the cr...

-1 s2017 FEB 14
Comments
Alevi Religious Ceremony, Architecture, and Practice
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