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Windy City Historians Podcast

Christopher Lynch & Patrick McBriarty

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Windy City Historians Podcast

Windy City Historians Podcast

Christopher Lynch & Patrick McBriarty

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Followers
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Plays
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About Us

Windy City Historians Podcast is a podcast on and about Chicago history for anyone curious about the Windy City hosted by authors Christopher Lynch and Patrick McBriarty.

Latest Episodes

Episode 17 – The Haymarket

EWhy is May Day a holiday celebrated all over the world, but not in the United States? The answer is piece of Chicago history pointing to the events culminating at Haymarket Square on May 4th, 1886.

58 min3 w ago
Comments
Episode 17 – The Haymarket

Episode 16 - The Second Star - the Fire

EThere is one story well-known throughout the world about the Windy City and a cow kicking over a lantern that set the Great Chicago Fire in motion. The fact that the story of Catherine O'Leary's cow is totally false seems not to matter, as this wrong-headed legend continues to perpetuate itself with the general public. As the newspaper editor Dutton Peabody says in the 1952 film The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, “when the legend becomes fact, print the legend.”And so it is, a hundred and fifty years later, Mrs. O’Leary and her cow live on in popular culture. The events of the evening of October 8th, 1871 would be the culmination of a prolonged hot, dry summer in the Midwest, and when Chicago began to burn, there were fires burning in several other places as well. However. Chicago and the legend of Mrs. O’Leary’s cow eclipsed the reporting of the other fires, and stuck in the popular imagination. The Great Chicago Fire became the second star on the flag of Chicago, a marked tragedy, as approximately one-third of the residents lost their homes and the more than 300 who lost their lives. But the fire was also considered a beginning for Chicago, a reset, a blank slate -- that would allow the city’s business leaders and architects to imagine a new and better Chicago to rise from the ashes like a great phoenix. In this episode, the Windy City Historians interview William Pack, a historian and author of “The Essential Great Chicago Fire” (2015) to recount the events of that faithful Sunday night when smoke was spotted southwest of the city center, near the intersection of Jefferson and DeKoven Streets. It is an illuminating story of mistakes, delays, human error, and heroism, and a transformative event for the young city on the prairie that became the "City on the Make" as later chronicled by Nelson Algren. Two days after the fire co-owner and managing editor of the Chicago Tribune Joseph Medill wrote, “We have lost money, but we have saved life, health, vigor and industry. Let the watchword henceforth be Chicago shall rise again!” In December of that year Medill would be elected mayor of the City of Chicago as a candidate of the "fireproof" party serving two terms from 1871 to 1873. Links to Research and Historic Sources: Presenter, magician, and interviewee William Pack's Educational ProgramingDraft of the Emancipation Proclamation Signed by President Abraham Lincoln destroyed in the Chicago FireChicago History Museum's online collection about the Great Chicago FireOut of the Ashes: The Birth of the Chicago Public Library"My Great-Great-Great-Great Grandfather’s Greatest Challenge: The Chicago Fire" by Caroline Thompson, Chicago Magazine, Oct. 10, 2017The release of prisoners and a "Fragile note illuminates city's great fire," by Mark Lebien, Chicago Tribune, Oct. 2, 1998.The documentary, Chicago Drawbridges we pull a segment from for this podcast courtesy of co-producers Stephen Hatch & Patrick McBriartyThe 1938 Movie “In Old Chicago” looks at life in pre-fire Chicago and the calamity of the Great Fire"The Legend of Mrs. O'Leary," by Margaret Carrol, Chicago Tribune, Oct. 10, 1996"Whodunit? The Mystery of Mrs. O'Leary's Cow," by Richard F. Bales, Chicago Public Library, Sept. 30, 2014"Catherine O’Leary, the Irishwoman blamed for starting the Great Chicago Fire," by Eoin Butler, The Irish Times, Feb. 24, 2017"Mrs. O'Leary, Cow Cleared by City Council Committee," by Steve Mills, Oct. 6, 1997"When the sky exploded: Remembering Tunguska," by EarthSky and Paul Scott Anderson in EARTH|SPACE, June 30, 2020.Chelyabinsk Meteor, CNN coverage on YouTube, Feb. 17, 2013Chelyabinsk Meteor Shockwave Compilation, YouTube, Feb. 18, 2013

59 minAUG 24
Comments
Episode 16 - The Second Star - the Fire

Episode 15: The Stockyards

EIn the Spring of 2020, one of the first cracks in the American economy with Covid-19 was the closing of several meatpacking plants in the United States. The nature of the process with workers stationed in close proximity to one another, poorly ventilated spaces, and often arduous work conditions and practices became a breeding ground for the virus and created Covid hot-spots around the country. Meanwhile, the White House exercising its executive authority via the Defense Production Act ordered slaughterhouses to remain open for fear of disrupting of the nation's meat supply. This underbelly of the food chain is often overlooked, yet for more than a century Chicago was largely identified with wholesale slaughter and meat processing thanks to the Union Stock Yard & Transit Company, which opened on Christmas Day 1865. Stockyards and the downstream processing operations would soon become a ubiquitous presence in the economy of the growing metropolis of Chicago, the commerce of the United States, and the world. Union Stock Yard from Sept. 1866--Chicago IllustratedMid-century postcard of the Stock YardsThe Stock Yards in 1941 The Union Stock Yard & Transit Company led Carl Sandburg to coin the dubious moniker for Chicago, “Hog Butcher to the World.” Yet these operations provided an important testing ground for great ideas and smart solutions employing many great minds, including civil engineer Octave Chanute (1832-1910) and the architect Daniel Burnham (1846-1912). The Stockyards were a prime tourist attraction in Chicago for the general public and people of note such as authors Rudyard Kipling, who was shocked by it, or Upton Sinclair, who based his novel “The Jungle” on the conditions and worker experiences there. The Yards as locals referred to it spurred additional innovations -- for instance the butchering disassembly line inspired Henry Ford to reverse the process to build automobiles which ultimately made them affordable to average Americans. The Union Stock Yard created huge fortunes and dynasties with names like Armour and Swift, often on the back of worker exploitation, which prompted strife and conflict and influenced the development of labor unions. Great gusts blowing across the prairie turned small fires into great conflagrations on several occasions, and yet the Yards survived for more than a century before meeting its demise to the gradual shift of economic winds. However in its heyday, the Yards was the place to be. Join us in this episode to hear some more great Chicago history as we interview historian Dominic A. Pacyga, author of Slaughterhouse: Chicago’s Union Stock Yard and the World It Made. Image from the 1934 Stock Yard FireThe Union Stock Yard Gate in 1879Unloading hogs from Stock Cars in 1912Christopher Lynch & Dominic PacygaRevolving Hog Wheel at the Armour Plant in 1912Dominic Pacyga & Patrick McBriarty Links to Research and Historic Documents WTTW Chicago Stories: The Union StockyardsAmerican Heritage: 1800s Chicago Union StockyardsCollection of images of the Union Stock Yard & Transit Company from the Industrial History websiteAuthor Dominic Pacyga and his books from the University of Chicago PressDominic Pacyga Shares History of Chicago’s Stockyards in ‘Slaughterhouse’ November 23, 2015 on WTTW1910 Union Stock Yards Fire on Chicagology website1934 Union Stock Yards Fire on Chicagology websiteChicago Public Art: Union Stockyard GatePackingtown Museum at The Plant in the Back of the Yards neighborhood of Chicago"The Jungle" a novel by Upton Sinclair based on the stockyardsOctave Chanute civil engineer and aviation pioneer

59 minJUL 31
Comments
Episode 15: The Stockyards

Episode 14: A Brewing City

EChicago has a long history of brewing and distilling; of taverns, pubs, and saloons; of alcohol distribution and consumption so we hope you will soak up this episode on the history of alcohol and its impact on the city. This episode of the Windy City Historians podcast is a historic concoction ranging across Chicago's history to explore the interplay of sociability and society around beer, spirits, and brewing to create, support, and shape the development of this toddling town and vice versa. We hope this will whet your appetite and briefly quench your thirst for history through a unique take on the City of Big Shoulders. In this episode co-hosts Christopher Lynch and Patrick McBriarty talk with Chicago historian Liz Garibay to discuss her research and fascinating stories of American and Chicago history as viewed through the lens of alcohol. Learn the true origin of PBR's Blue Ribbon -- it's NOT from the World's Colombian Exposition of 1893 -- OR about the Lager Beer Riots of 1855 -- as we serve up another interesting brew of Windy City history. Cheers! Beer for Chicago intercepted in Zion, IL during ProhibitionE. Josetti Brewing Co. of Chicago advertisementSchlitz Brewing Company in Milwaukee, WIServing Beer in a Tavern in ChicagoChicago Harbor Mouth ca. 1900 Links to Research and Historic Documents Latest Chicago Beer News -- Historic Seipp Brewing Returns to Chicago a revival of a historic beer from the great-great-great-granddaughter of Conrad Seipp -- look for it at Metropolitan Brewing Co.Bygone Breweries from the Forgotten Chicago website The Oxford Companion to Beer definition of Chicago from the Craft Beer & Brewing website Chicago Breweries from the Chicagology websiteHistory of Lill & Diversy Brewing from the Digital Research Library of Illinois History JournalHistory of the Schoenhofen Brewery from the Forgotten Chicago websiteThe book Al Capone's Beer Wars by John J. BinderChicago's Brewseum's exhibit at the Field Museum and the video on the 1855 Lager Beer Riot videoHistory on Tap -- historian Liz Garibay's website of events, tours, and more...

69 minJUN 25
Comments
Episode 14: A Brewing City

Episode 13: Early Chicago

EIn this episode of our “Laying the Foundation” series of the Windy City Historians we explore an often ignored and long forgotten era and complete our interview with Dr. Ann Durkin Keating. We tap into the history of Juliette Kinzie and the city’s early wheelers and dealers as it rises up out of the swampy prairie landscape along the Y-shaped Chicago River on far southwestern shore of Lake Michigan.

55 minMAY 27
Comments
Episode 13: Early Chicago

Special Episode: Don’t Sneeze, Cough or Spit!

EThe contagion began suddenly in the northern suburbs of Chicago and floated south toward the city like an invisible cloud. Soon restaurants, saloons, and theaters were closed and the police had the power to break up crowds and arrest individuals for spitting, coughing or sneezing in public. Public funerals were forbidden and elective surgeries canceled. Everyone wore face masks. Was this Spring, 2020? No, it was Chicago in the Autumn of 1918. Join the Windy City Historians for this special episode as we step away from the chronological telling of Chicago history of our ongoing “Laying the Foundation” series, and instead chart the course of epidemics and outbreaks in Chicago history. In particular, we dig into the, so called, Spanish Influenza epidemic of 1918. This pandemic reveals many parallels between the events of 1918 and today's struggle with the novel coronavirus (SARS Cov-2, its new official name) in 2020. In this episode we interview historian Joseph Gustaitis, author of ...

93 minAPR 29
Comments
Special Episode: Don’t Sneeze, Cough or Spit!

Episode 12: The First Star – part two

EFort Dearborn at the beginning of the War of 1812 . . . is it a Battle or a Massacre? How should we, in the twenty-first century, talk about the events that occurred on Chicago's lakefront on August 15, 1812 -- a month-and-a-half after the declaration of war? How do we describe what happened to the column of approximately 100 soldiers, farmers, women and children in Indian Country that abandoned Fort Dearborn, mostly on foot, for Fort Wayne when they are attacked by approximately 500 Native Americans? Join us in this episode of the Windy City Historians Podcast for the second half of our interview with history professor Ann Durkin Keating, Ph.D. and The First Star -- a reference to the first star on the Flag of Chicago. Does William Wells actually get his heart carved out to be eaten by the victors? Find out about this and much more as we discuss the final events, implications, art and language surrounding Chicago and aftermath of this infamous attack in Chicago in 1812. We hope you will enjoy it as much as we have putting it together! Engraving of the Battle of Fort Dearborn by S.C. HooperSculptural relief of the battle on the SW bridge house of the Michigan Avenue BridgeStatue of the Fort Deaborn AttackCommemorative plaque in the sidewalk by Michigan Avenue and Wacker DriveDr. Ann Durkin Keating being interviewed by the Windy City Historians Links to Research and History Documents Rising Up From Indian Country by Ann Durkin Keating, Ph. D.H.A. Musham, “Where Did the Battle of Chicago Take Place?”Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, 36, no. 1 (March 1943)Dr. Keating also recommends: Constance R. Buckley, “Searching for Fort Dearborn: Perception, Commemoration, and Celebration of an Urban Creation Memory,” (Ph.D. diss., Loyola University, 2005), 6.Topinabee (1758-1826) - a Pottawatomie leader from the St. Joseph River areaSimon Pokagon (1830-1899) - author and Native American advocate and Pottawatomie born in southwest Michigan. Son of Leopold Pokagon who was present at the Battle of Fort Dearborn.More about Simon Pokagon and the events at Fort Dearborn on August 15, 1812Battle of Fort Dearborn

63 minFEB 24
Comments
Episode 12: The First Star – part two

Episode 11: The First Star

EDid you realize each of the four stars on the Chicago Flag represent important dates in Chicago history? The two blue stripes on the flag have a special meaning as well. In this Episode we will discuss the events running up to the Fort Dearborn Massacre which is represented by the first star on Chicago's flag. We interview historian, professor, and author Ann Durkin Keating, Ph.D. about the events leading up to what she prefers to call the Battle of Fort Dearborn which occurred on Chicago's lakefront on August 15, 1812. This is the eleventh episode in our inaugural series we call "Laying the Foundation" and continues our chronological overview of Chicago history from its beginnings up to the 1930s. Since March 2019, we have released a new episode each month, usually on the last Friday of the month, to bring you a new slice of fascinating Chicago history. We hope you are enjoying the podcast and we could use your help to expand our audience. Please tell your friends, family, acquaintances, and even complete strangers about these amazing Chicago stories in audible form available only on the Windy City Historians Podcast. Join our Facebook group the Windy City Historians of over 8K members and discover more great Chicago history. The first Chicago flag in 1917George Catlin painting of Tenskwatawa the Shawnee Prophet, brother of TecumsehStamp of the first Fort DearbornHistory and evolution grapic of the Chicago flag Links to Research and History Documents Rising Up From Indian Country by Ann Durkin KeatingThe Middle Ground by Richard WhiteTecumseh (1768-1813) Shawnee leaderBattle of TippecanoeMain Poche: The Last of the Traditional Potawatomi War ChiefsThomas Jefferson and development of his Indian policyMr. Jefferson's Hammer by Robert M. OwensThomas Forsyth (1771-1833) Peoria trader and partner of John KinzieNinan Edwards (1775-1833) Governor of the Illinois Territory from 1808 to 1818Capt. Nathan Heald (1775-1832) Commander of Fort Dearborn in 1812Lt. Linai Helm (? - 1838) junior officer at Fort Dearborn in 1812Ensign, George Ronan (ca. 1783 - 1812) junior officer at Fort Dearborn in 1812

59 minFEB 1
Comments
Episode 11: The First Star

Episode 10: The First Murder

EFounded in 1803, Chicago's Fort Dearborn is the western most outpost on the frontier, and by 1812 still the most isolated fort in Indian Country. The garrison and few settlers are outnumbered five-to-one by the neighboring tribes within a day's ride. A pivotal year in Chicago history the corner of today's Wacker Drive and Michigan Avenue is the site of Chicago's first murder on June 17. At that point tensions are already high and this killing comes one day before Congress declares war on Great Britain. Although, the approximately 100 residents of Chicago will have no idea war is declared until mid- to late-July. Just why trader John Kinzie stabbed fort interpreter Jean Lalime to death is a two-centuries' old Chicago mystery. Was it jealousy, a trade dispute, bad blood? Listen in as we set the scene of Chicago on the cusp of the War of 1812, weight the accounts, motivations, and events surrounding this gruesome murder on the banks of the Chicago River. We hope you enjoy this fascinat...

61 minJAN 3
Comments
Episode 10: The First Murder

Episode 9: The First Scandal

EEarly settlement of Chicago begins, Fort Dearborn is established at this outpost in Indian Country and it gets entangled in Chicago's first scandal.

60 min2019 NOV 28
Comments
Episode 9: The First Scandal

Latest Episodes

Episode 17 – The Haymarket

EWhy is May Day a holiday celebrated all over the world, but not in the United States? The answer is piece of Chicago history pointing to the events culminating at Haymarket Square on May 4th, 1886.

58 min3 w ago
Comments
Episode 17 – The Haymarket

Episode 16 - The Second Star - the Fire

EThere is one story well-known throughout the world about the Windy City and a cow kicking over a lantern that set the Great Chicago Fire in motion. The fact that the story of Catherine O'Leary's cow is totally false seems not to matter, as this wrong-headed legend continues to perpetuate itself with the general public. As the newspaper editor Dutton Peabody says in the 1952 film The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, “when the legend becomes fact, print the legend.”And so it is, a hundred and fifty years later, Mrs. O’Leary and her cow live on in popular culture. The events of the evening of October 8th, 1871 would be the culmination of a prolonged hot, dry summer in the Midwest, and when Chicago began to burn, there were fires burning in several other places as well. However. Chicago and the legend of Mrs. O’Leary’s cow eclipsed the reporting of the other fires, and stuck in the popular imagination. The Great Chicago Fire became the second star on the flag of Chicago, a marked tragedy, as approximately one-third of the residents lost their homes and the more than 300 who lost their lives. But the fire was also considered a beginning for Chicago, a reset, a blank slate -- that would allow the city’s business leaders and architects to imagine a new and better Chicago to rise from the ashes like a great phoenix. In this episode, the Windy City Historians interview William Pack, a historian and author of “The Essential Great Chicago Fire” (2015) to recount the events of that faithful Sunday night when smoke was spotted southwest of the city center, near the intersection of Jefferson and DeKoven Streets. It is an illuminating story of mistakes, delays, human error, and heroism, and a transformative event for the young city on the prairie that became the "City on the Make" as later chronicled by Nelson Algren. Two days after the fire co-owner and managing editor of the Chicago Tribune Joseph Medill wrote, “We have lost money, but we have saved life, health, vigor and industry. Let the watchword henceforth be Chicago shall rise again!” In December of that year Medill would be elected mayor of the City of Chicago as a candidate of the "fireproof" party serving two terms from 1871 to 1873. Links to Research and Historic Sources: Presenter, magician, and interviewee William Pack's Educational ProgramingDraft of the Emancipation Proclamation Signed by President Abraham Lincoln destroyed in the Chicago FireChicago History Museum's online collection about the Great Chicago FireOut of the Ashes: The Birth of the Chicago Public Library"My Great-Great-Great-Great Grandfather’s Greatest Challenge: The Chicago Fire" by Caroline Thompson, Chicago Magazine, Oct. 10, 2017The release of prisoners and a "Fragile note illuminates city's great fire," by Mark Lebien, Chicago Tribune, Oct. 2, 1998.The documentary, Chicago Drawbridges we pull a segment from for this podcast courtesy of co-producers Stephen Hatch & Patrick McBriartyThe 1938 Movie “In Old Chicago” looks at life in pre-fire Chicago and the calamity of the Great Fire"The Legend of Mrs. O'Leary," by Margaret Carrol, Chicago Tribune, Oct. 10, 1996"Whodunit? The Mystery of Mrs. O'Leary's Cow," by Richard F. Bales, Chicago Public Library, Sept. 30, 2014"Catherine O’Leary, the Irishwoman blamed for starting the Great Chicago Fire," by Eoin Butler, The Irish Times, Feb. 24, 2017"Mrs. O'Leary, Cow Cleared by City Council Committee," by Steve Mills, Oct. 6, 1997"When the sky exploded: Remembering Tunguska," by EarthSky and Paul Scott Anderson in EARTH|SPACE, June 30, 2020.Chelyabinsk Meteor, CNN coverage on YouTube, Feb. 17, 2013Chelyabinsk Meteor Shockwave Compilation, YouTube, Feb. 18, 2013

59 minAUG 24
Comments
Episode 16 - The Second Star - the Fire

Episode 15: The Stockyards

EIn the Spring of 2020, one of the first cracks in the American economy with Covid-19 was the closing of several meatpacking plants in the United States. The nature of the process with workers stationed in close proximity to one another, poorly ventilated spaces, and often arduous work conditions and practices became a breeding ground for the virus and created Covid hot-spots around the country. Meanwhile, the White House exercising its executive authority via the Defense Production Act ordered slaughterhouses to remain open for fear of disrupting of the nation's meat supply. This underbelly of the food chain is often overlooked, yet for more than a century Chicago was largely identified with wholesale slaughter and meat processing thanks to the Union Stock Yard & Transit Company, which opened on Christmas Day 1865. Stockyards and the downstream processing operations would soon become a ubiquitous presence in the economy of the growing metropolis of Chicago, the commerce of the United States, and the world. Union Stock Yard from Sept. 1866--Chicago IllustratedMid-century postcard of the Stock YardsThe Stock Yards in 1941 The Union Stock Yard & Transit Company led Carl Sandburg to coin the dubious moniker for Chicago, “Hog Butcher to the World.” Yet these operations provided an important testing ground for great ideas and smart solutions employing many great minds, including civil engineer Octave Chanute (1832-1910) and the architect Daniel Burnham (1846-1912). The Stockyards were a prime tourist attraction in Chicago for the general public and people of note such as authors Rudyard Kipling, who was shocked by it, or Upton Sinclair, who based his novel “The Jungle” on the conditions and worker experiences there. The Yards as locals referred to it spurred additional innovations -- for instance the butchering disassembly line inspired Henry Ford to reverse the process to build automobiles which ultimately made them affordable to average Americans. The Union Stock Yard created huge fortunes and dynasties with names like Armour and Swift, often on the back of worker exploitation, which prompted strife and conflict and influenced the development of labor unions. Great gusts blowing across the prairie turned small fires into great conflagrations on several occasions, and yet the Yards survived for more than a century before meeting its demise to the gradual shift of economic winds. However in its heyday, the Yards was the place to be. Join us in this episode to hear some more great Chicago history as we interview historian Dominic A. Pacyga, author of Slaughterhouse: Chicago’s Union Stock Yard and the World It Made. Image from the 1934 Stock Yard FireThe Union Stock Yard Gate in 1879Unloading hogs from Stock Cars in 1912Christopher Lynch & Dominic PacygaRevolving Hog Wheel at the Armour Plant in 1912Dominic Pacyga & Patrick McBriarty Links to Research and Historic Documents WTTW Chicago Stories: The Union StockyardsAmerican Heritage: 1800s Chicago Union StockyardsCollection of images of the Union Stock Yard & Transit Company from the Industrial History websiteAuthor Dominic Pacyga and his books from the University of Chicago PressDominic Pacyga Shares History of Chicago’s Stockyards in ‘Slaughterhouse’ November 23, 2015 on WTTW1910 Union Stock Yards Fire on Chicagology website1934 Union Stock Yards Fire on Chicagology websiteChicago Public Art: Union Stockyard GatePackingtown Museum at The Plant in the Back of the Yards neighborhood of Chicago"The Jungle" a novel by Upton Sinclair based on the stockyardsOctave Chanute civil engineer and aviation pioneer

59 minJUL 31
Comments
Episode 15: The Stockyards

Episode 14: A Brewing City

EChicago has a long history of brewing and distilling; of taverns, pubs, and saloons; of alcohol distribution and consumption so we hope you will soak up this episode on the history of alcohol and its impact on the city. This episode of the Windy City Historians podcast is a historic concoction ranging across Chicago's history to explore the interplay of sociability and society around beer, spirits, and brewing to create, support, and shape the development of this toddling town and vice versa. We hope this will whet your appetite and briefly quench your thirst for history through a unique take on the City of Big Shoulders. In this episode co-hosts Christopher Lynch and Patrick McBriarty talk with Chicago historian Liz Garibay to discuss her research and fascinating stories of American and Chicago history as viewed through the lens of alcohol. Learn the true origin of PBR's Blue Ribbon -- it's NOT from the World's Colombian Exposition of 1893 -- OR about the Lager Beer Riots of 1855 -- as we serve up another interesting brew of Windy City history. Cheers! Beer for Chicago intercepted in Zion, IL during ProhibitionE. Josetti Brewing Co. of Chicago advertisementSchlitz Brewing Company in Milwaukee, WIServing Beer in a Tavern in ChicagoChicago Harbor Mouth ca. 1900 Links to Research and Historic Documents Latest Chicago Beer News -- Historic Seipp Brewing Returns to Chicago a revival of a historic beer from the great-great-great-granddaughter of Conrad Seipp -- look for it at Metropolitan Brewing Co.Bygone Breweries from the Forgotten Chicago website The Oxford Companion to Beer definition of Chicago from the Craft Beer & Brewing website Chicago Breweries from the Chicagology websiteHistory of Lill & Diversy Brewing from the Digital Research Library of Illinois History JournalHistory of the Schoenhofen Brewery from the Forgotten Chicago websiteThe book Al Capone's Beer Wars by John J. BinderChicago's Brewseum's exhibit at the Field Museum and the video on the 1855 Lager Beer Riot videoHistory on Tap -- historian Liz Garibay's website of events, tours, and more...

69 minJUN 25
Comments
Episode 14: A Brewing City

Episode 13: Early Chicago

EIn this episode of our “Laying the Foundation” series of the Windy City Historians we explore an often ignored and long forgotten era and complete our interview with Dr. Ann Durkin Keating. We tap into the history of Juliette Kinzie and the city’s early wheelers and dealers as it rises up out of the swampy prairie landscape along the Y-shaped Chicago River on far southwestern shore of Lake Michigan.

55 minMAY 27
Comments
Episode 13: Early Chicago

Special Episode: Don’t Sneeze, Cough or Spit!

EThe contagion began suddenly in the northern suburbs of Chicago and floated south toward the city like an invisible cloud. Soon restaurants, saloons, and theaters were closed and the police had the power to break up crowds and arrest individuals for spitting, coughing or sneezing in public. Public funerals were forbidden and elective surgeries canceled. Everyone wore face masks. Was this Spring, 2020? No, it was Chicago in the Autumn of 1918. Join the Windy City Historians for this special episode as we step away from the chronological telling of Chicago history of our ongoing “Laying the Foundation” series, and instead chart the course of epidemics and outbreaks in Chicago history. In particular, we dig into the, so called, Spanish Influenza epidemic of 1918. This pandemic reveals many parallels between the events of 1918 and today's struggle with the novel coronavirus (SARS Cov-2, its new official name) in 2020. In this episode we interview historian Joseph Gustaitis, author of ...

93 minAPR 29
Comments
Special Episode: Don’t Sneeze, Cough or Spit!

Episode 12: The First Star – part two

EFort Dearborn at the beginning of the War of 1812 . . . is it a Battle or a Massacre? How should we, in the twenty-first century, talk about the events that occurred on Chicago's lakefront on August 15, 1812 -- a month-and-a-half after the declaration of war? How do we describe what happened to the column of approximately 100 soldiers, farmers, women and children in Indian Country that abandoned Fort Dearborn, mostly on foot, for Fort Wayne when they are attacked by approximately 500 Native Americans? Join us in this episode of the Windy City Historians Podcast for the second half of our interview with history professor Ann Durkin Keating, Ph.D. and The First Star -- a reference to the first star on the Flag of Chicago. Does William Wells actually get his heart carved out to be eaten by the victors? Find out about this and much more as we discuss the final events, implications, art and language surrounding Chicago and aftermath of this infamous attack in Chicago in 1812. We hope you will enjoy it as much as we have putting it together! Engraving of the Battle of Fort Dearborn by S.C. HooperSculptural relief of the battle on the SW bridge house of the Michigan Avenue BridgeStatue of the Fort Deaborn AttackCommemorative plaque in the sidewalk by Michigan Avenue and Wacker DriveDr. Ann Durkin Keating being interviewed by the Windy City Historians Links to Research and History Documents Rising Up From Indian Country by Ann Durkin Keating, Ph. D.H.A. Musham, “Where Did the Battle of Chicago Take Place?”Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, 36, no. 1 (March 1943)Dr. Keating also recommends: Constance R. Buckley, “Searching for Fort Dearborn: Perception, Commemoration, and Celebration of an Urban Creation Memory,” (Ph.D. diss., Loyola University, 2005), 6.Topinabee (1758-1826) - a Pottawatomie leader from the St. Joseph River areaSimon Pokagon (1830-1899) - author and Native American advocate and Pottawatomie born in southwest Michigan. Son of Leopold Pokagon who was present at the Battle of Fort Dearborn.More about Simon Pokagon and the events at Fort Dearborn on August 15, 1812Battle of Fort Dearborn

63 minFEB 24
Comments
Episode 12: The First Star – part two

Episode 11: The First Star

EDid you realize each of the four stars on the Chicago Flag represent important dates in Chicago history? The two blue stripes on the flag have a special meaning as well. In this Episode we will discuss the events running up to the Fort Dearborn Massacre which is represented by the first star on Chicago's flag. We interview historian, professor, and author Ann Durkin Keating, Ph.D. about the events leading up to what she prefers to call the Battle of Fort Dearborn which occurred on Chicago's lakefront on August 15, 1812. This is the eleventh episode in our inaugural series we call "Laying the Foundation" and continues our chronological overview of Chicago history from its beginnings up to the 1930s. Since March 2019, we have released a new episode each month, usually on the last Friday of the month, to bring you a new slice of fascinating Chicago history. We hope you are enjoying the podcast and we could use your help to expand our audience. Please tell your friends, family, acquaintances, and even complete strangers about these amazing Chicago stories in audible form available only on the Windy City Historians Podcast. Join our Facebook group the Windy City Historians of over 8K members and discover more great Chicago history. The first Chicago flag in 1917George Catlin painting of Tenskwatawa the Shawnee Prophet, brother of TecumsehStamp of the first Fort DearbornHistory and evolution grapic of the Chicago flag Links to Research and History Documents Rising Up From Indian Country by Ann Durkin KeatingThe Middle Ground by Richard WhiteTecumseh (1768-1813) Shawnee leaderBattle of TippecanoeMain Poche: The Last of the Traditional Potawatomi War ChiefsThomas Jefferson and development of his Indian policyMr. Jefferson's Hammer by Robert M. OwensThomas Forsyth (1771-1833) Peoria trader and partner of John KinzieNinan Edwards (1775-1833) Governor of the Illinois Territory from 1808 to 1818Capt. Nathan Heald (1775-1832) Commander of Fort Dearborn in 1812Lt. Linai Helm (? - 1838) junior officer at Fort Dearborn in 1812Ensign, George Ronan (ca. 1783 - 1812) junior officer at Fort Dearborn in 1812

59 minFEB 1
Comments
Episode 11: The First Star

Episode 10: The First Murder

EFounded in 1803, Chicago's Fort Dearborn is the western most outpost on the frontier, and by 1812 still the most isolated fort in Indian Country. The garrison and few settlers are outnumbered five-to-one by the neighboring tribes within a day's ride. A pivotal year in Chicago history the corner of today's Wacker Drive and Michigan Avenue is the site of Chicago's first murder on June 17. At that point tensions are already high and this killing comes one day before Congress declares war on Great Britain. Although, the approximately 100 residents of Chicago will have no idea war is declared until mid- to late-July. Just why trader John Kinzie stabbed fort interpreter Jean Lalime to death is a two-centuries' old Chicago mystery. Was it jealousy, a trade dispute, bad blood? Listen in as we set the scene of Chicago on the cusp of the War of 1812, weight the accounts, motivations, and events surrounding this gruesome murder on the banks of the Chicago River. We hope you enjoy this fascinat...

61 minJAN 3
Comments
Episode 10: The First Murder

Episode 9: The First Scandal

EEarly settlement of Chicago begins, Fort Dearborn is established at this outpost in Indian Country and it gets entangled in Chicago's first scandal.

60 min2019 NOV 28
Comments
Episode 9: The First Scandal
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