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Written In Blood History

Evergreen Podcasts

3
Followers
29
Plays
Written In Blood History

Written In Blood History

Evergreen Podcasts

3
Followers
29
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

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About Us

History is people. These are their stories. They are written in blood.

Latest Episodes

Almost Episode: Finding the Phantom

There are exactly three musicals that I actually like. The Phantom of the Opera is one of them. As my wife is very used to by now, when Autumn rolls around, I start playing the Phantoms ominous music. Its sort of a childhood tradition. For some reason during the days leading up to Halloween, my mom used to blast the 1986 version on the living room speakers. So, I suppose its learned behavior. It’s as much a part of Halloween for me as Dracula. And frankly, I think the Phantom is creepier. I was fortunate enough to see The Phantom of the Opera live in Toronto when I was ten years old – and I’ll never forget it because it scared the crap out of me. As soon as the lifeless body of the murdered stagehand came swinging down from the rafters in a noose, I knew this was a different kind of show. So for this Halloween season, my favorite season of the year, I wondered if perhaps I could do an Almost Episode of the inspiration behind the novel. I’ve always heard that the author claimed it was based on a true story, but I had never actually looked into it. I was pleasantly surprised with what I found. Hopefully you will be too. So close your eyes, start a journey to a strange new world, as we discover the real story behind the music of the night, in this Almost Episode: Finding the Phantom.

15 min1 w ago
Comments
Almost Episode: Finding the Phantom

Robert Smalls: Born a Man

EWelcome everyone to season 2 of Written in Blood History, now part of the Evergreen Podcast Network. I am truly grateful and honored to have you as a listener. Your continued listenership gives me the motivation to keep this little hobby of mine up, one which I thoroughly enjoy. Today’s subject is one that I had on the docket for season one but kept getting postponing. Whenever I pick a biographical subject to do a show on, I need to be able to relate to them on some level. Otherwise the passion just isn’t there for me. Other history podcasters can do any subject any time, anywhere, and that’s great. But it’s just not how I work. Our subject today was a slave of the American South before and during the civil war. And so, what could I, a white guy of 100% western-European origin relate to with a chattel slave of the south? How could I possibly do justice to his story? I take this very seriously because, even though this is just a simple little history podcast, these people were real people. Its out of respect for the dead that I try to present them in a way I think they would have liked to be presented, while staying factual and reasonable at the same time. Put simply, I was intimidated by the thought of doing a bio on someone that I just had no way of relating to, and without a solid cross section of experience, I was quite sure my attempt would fall short. But it turns out this slave and I do have something in common. And it’s something that was right in front of my face throughout the entire research phase. I simply failed to recognize it. And so, without further filibustering from me, I present to you the first subject of season 2, and he is an awesome one, Robert Smalls: Born a Man.

43 min3 w ago
Comments
Robert Smalls: Born a Man

Season 2: Looking Behind, Looking Ahead

EI’ll keep this short since this isn’t really a history episode, but more of a transition from season one to season two. I went into this thing with very little idea of how long I would be doing it, or even exactly who I would be covering. It began with my interest in genealogy, which is why many of my early episodes have somewhat of a pedigree connection to me. And I still have more of those episodes planned actually. But since the first episode was well received, and since I enjoyed doing a history podcast so much, I decided to expand into other historical figures, whose stories, I felt deserved to be told in a way that I wanted to hear them. Then I hit up my sister who happens to be a graphic artist and she started producing the kickass cover art that runs with each episode. Soon I began including the Almost Episodes as a way of publishing something of value on a more frequent basis, plus I just had so many stories that I wanted to tell that either didn’t have enough meat for a...

3 minSEP 15
Comments
Season 2: Looking Behind, Looking Ahead

Patton, Part Two: The Force Multiplier

EIf this is your first time listening, you may want to go back and start with Part I of Patton, which bring you up to speed into the peace time era between world wars where Part II picks up. Oh, and by the way, the subject of this episode was blunt and at times vulgar and insensitive person by today’s standards. Because I will be quoting him, it should be expected that there will be some rough language. So, this is an official language warning. While I try to avoid being gratuitous, I don’t want to present a false image of the subject either. If this type of language is a problem for you, then now is the time to tune out. For everyone else, I’m not going to spend much time here with an intro, other than a reminder to turn your volume up for Dario’s expertly crafted versions of The Overture of 1812, it’s a piece of music as epic as the man we are learning about. That man is Patton: The Force Multiplier. Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/writteninbloodhistory)

63 minSEP 7
Comments
Patton, Part Two: The Force Multiplier

Patton, Part One: Master of the Sword

EI cannot believe I have gotten to this point in the podcast, but this is my 12th full length monthly episode. This episode completes an entire year of Written in Blood History. I am not going to get all sappy on you in this intro. That will all come later. Right now, I need to introduce my final subject of season 1. Oh, and by the way, the subject of this episode was blunt and at times vulgar and insensitive person by today’s standards. Because I will be quoting him, it should be expected that there will be some rough language. So, this is an official language warning. While I try to avoid being gratuitous, I don’t want to present a false image of the subject either. If this type of language is a problem for you, then now is the time to tune out. Imagine if you had someone as prolific in battle as Alexander the Great or Julius Caesar, who lived in the twentieth century – with all the information that would be available on their life, there’s simply no way you could contain it al...

41 minSEP 1
Comments
Patton, Part One: Master of the Sword

Almost Episode: The Nine

EImagine for a moment you’re at funeral of a beloved uncle, one of those guys who knew a ton of people, resulting in a massive who’s who of attendees. Then imagine yourself amongst all your other cousin’s and uncles, and other not so distant relatives. Usually something of a cathartic experience amid sadness, right? But now introduce some family drama into the mix. Let’s say there’s some history between you and a few other members. Makes this gathering a bit more uncomfortable, right? But I’m not done. How about your all unimaginable rich and each have enormous standing armies with hundreds of thousands of men. On top of that, all of you know that someone in the near future is going to start a war – but no one know who. Though there are some prime suspects. So much for the funeral – this quaint little family gathering has turned into something far more consequential. Something far more explosive. The event I’m trying to relate is exactly what this Almost Episode is about. Or...

18 minAUG 15
Comments
Almost Episode: The Nine

Tolkien: Myth-Maker In The Somme

Before I dive into the prologue here I want to ask you for a favor. If you have been listening to this little podcast and have enjoyed its content, and feel it has been worth a dollar a month, would you be so kind as to become a patron of the show? I am fairly certain that I will never, ever have formal adds on the show. I think the content discussed here is just too serious. But alas, it isn’t free to produce. There are audio hosting fees, website fees, production costs, plus I have to purchase at least one book per episode typically. This is a passion-hobby for me, so I’ll probably keep this up no matter what, as long as people seem to be interested. But it would be nice if I could at lease get to about cost neutral territory. To be completely transparent – that number is roughly $100 a month. To become a patron, you can find the link on my website at writteninbloodhistory.com, or go to patreon.com/writteninbloodhistory. As a bonus to your patronage you get a shout out that the...

46 minAUG 1
Comments
Tolkien: Myth-Maker In The Somme

Almost Episode: The Boston Molassacre

Before I dive into this Almost Episode, I need to give a shout out to my excellent brother-in-law, Walter. Walter has very generously become my newest patron for the show. And so, as a patron, he gets this shout out, as well as early access to episodes and behind the scenes research I am diving into. For just a buck a month, you too can be like Walter and help me offset the production values of this show such as hosting fees and the cost to obtain research material. To become a patron, you can go to patreon.com/writteninbloodhistory. The following story is one of those freak, and yet totally avoidable disasters. With perhaps just a little but more attention to engineering limitations, a better man in charge, a tad municipal oversight, and a bit more concern for the lives of the poor in Boston, this would never have become one of the most bizarre disaster stories in history. But, like a toddler touching a hot stove, sometimes mankind must burn itself before it learns a lesson. And ev...

13 minJUL 15
Comments
Almost Episode: The Boston Molassacre

Hugh Percy: Kicking the Hornet's Nest

The American War for Independence was my first historical love. When diving into the details of the war, it doesn’t take long to discover all the near misses, and all the opportunities for alternative history. Washington’s coat riddled with bullet holes, Benedict Arnold’s nearly successful plan to sink the entire war effort, the battle of Trenton New Jersey, the arrival of the Baron Von Steuben at Valley Forge, the fog that saved the army escaping New York, the Capture of General Charles Lee, the death of Doctor Warren, the French entering the war. All these things: had a bullet been one inch to the left, or had the wind picked up, or had any one the pivotal men or women not been in a certain place at a certain time – who knows how things would have played out. I have at least one ancestor who fought at Lexington and Concord, John Bosworth – who would have been about 24 at the time. He like so many at the time was a member of the Massachusetts militia and answered the alarm tha...

59 minJUL 1
Comments
Hugh Percy: Kicking the Hornet's Nest

Almost Episode: Supercell Over Grand Island

Before I get going here I need to give a shout out to Erin from Northwest Indiana. She recently signed up to be a patron of the show, and so not only will she be listening to this episode a few days earlier than its official release, she is also owed this particular shout out. Erin, thank you so much – I continue to be amazed that people find my voice tolerable. To learn more about the shows patreon page visit patreon.com/writteninbloodhistory. I am in fact recording this episode exactly 40 years to the day after the events I’m about to describe. I have, for as long as I can remember been somewhat obsessed with tornadoes, and so likewise have long been familiar with what happened in Grand Island, Nebraska. When I began to research if there was enough material to use for the show, I was pleasantly surprised to find that the 40th anniversary was nigh. And so, it was officially added to the lineup. Despite my aforementioned obsession, I likewise acknowledge that tornadoes are probabl...

22 minJUN 15
Comments
Almost Episode: Supercell Over Grand Island

Latest Episodes

Almost Episode: Finding the Phantom

There are exactly three musicals that I actually like. The Phantom of the Opera is one of them. As my wife is very used to by now, when Autumn rolls around, I start playing the Phantoms ominous music. Its sort of a childhood tradition. For some reason during the days leading up to Halloween, my mom used to blast the 1986 version on the living room speakers. So, I suppose its learned behavior. It’s as much a part of Halloween for me as Dracula. And frankly, I think the Phantom is creepier. I was fortunate enough to see The Phantom of the Opera live in Toronto when I was ten years old – and I’ll never forget it because it scared the crap out of me. As soon as the lifeless body of the murdered stagehand came swinging down from the rafters in a noose, I knew this was a different kind of show. So for this Halloween season, my favorite season of the year, I wondered if perhaps I could do an Almost Episode of the inspiration behind the novel. I’ve always heard that the author claimed it was based on a true story, but I had never actually looked into it. I was pleasantly surprised with what I found. Hopefully you will be too. So close your eyes, start a journey to a strange new world, as we discover the real story behind the music of the night, in this Almost Episode: Finding the Phantom.

15 min1 w ago
Comments
Almost Episode: Finding the Phantom

Robert Smalls: Born a Man

EWelcome everyone to season 2 of Written in Blood History, now part of the Evergreen Podcast Network. I am truly grateful and honored to have you as a listener. Your continued listenership gives me the motivation to keep this little hobby of mine up, one which I thoroughly enjoy. Today’s subject is one that I had on the docket for season one but kept getting postponing. Whenever I pick a biographical subject to do a show on, I need to be able to relate to them on some level. Otherwise the passion just isn’t there for me. Other history podcasters can do any subject any time, anywhere, and that’s great. But it’s just not how I work. Our subject today was a slave of the American South before and during the civil war. And so, what could I, a white guy of 100% western-European origin relate to with a chattel slave of the south? How could I possibly do justice to his story? I take this very seriously because, even though this is just a simple little history podcast, these people were real people. Its out of respect for the dead that I try to present them in a way I think they would have liked to be presented, while staying factual and reasonable at the same time. Put simply, I was intimidated by the thought of doing a bio on someone that I just had no way of relating to, and without a solid cross section of experience, I was quite sure my attempt would fall short. But it turns out this slave and I do have something in common. And it’s something that was right in front of my face throughout the entire research phase. I simply failed to recognize it. And so, without further filibustering from me, I present to you the first subject of season 2, and he is an awesome one, Robert Smalls: Born a Man.

43 min3 w ago
Comments
Robert Smalls: Born a Man

Season 2: Looking Behind, Looking Ahead

EI’ll keep this short since this isn’t really a history episode, but more of a transition from season one to season two. I went into this thing with very little idea of how long I would be doing it, or even exactly who I would be covering. It began with my interest in genealogy, which is why many of my early episodes have somewhat of a pedigree connection to me. And I still have more of those episodes planned actually. But since the first episode was well received, and since I enjoyed doing a history podcast so much, I decided to expand into other historical figures, whose stories, I felt deserved to be told in a way that I wanted to hear them. Then I hit up my sister who happens to be a graphic artist and she started producing the kickass cover art that runs with each episode. Soon I began including the Almost Episodes as a way of publishing something of value on a more frequent basis, plus I just had so many stories that I wanted to tell that either didn’t have enough meat for a...

3 minSEP 15
Comments
Season 2: Looking Behind, Looking Ahead

Patton, Part Two: The Force Multiplier

EIf this is your first time listening, you may want to go back and start with Part I of Patton, which bring you up to speed into the peace time era between world wars where Part II picks up. Oh, and by the way, the subject of this episode was blunt and at times vulgar and insensitive person by today’s standards. Because I will be quoting him, it should be expected that there will be some rough language. So, this is an official language warning. While I try to avoid being gratuitous, I don’t want to present a false image of the subject either. If this type of language is a problem for you, then now is the time to tune out. For everyone else, I’m not going to spend much time here with an intro, other than a reminder to turn your volume up for Dario’s expertly crafted versions of The Overture of 1812, it’s a piece of music as epic as the man we are learning about. That man is Patton: The Force Multiplier. Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/writteninbloodhistory)

63 minSEP 7
Comments
Patton, Part Two: The Force Multiplier

Patton, Part One: Master of the Sword

EI cannot believe I have gotten to this point in the podcast, but this is my 12th full length monthly episode. This episode completes an entire year of Written in Blood History. I am not going to get all sappy on you in this intro. That will all come later. Right now, I need to introduce my final subject of season 1. Oh, and by the way, the subject of this episode was blunt and at times vulgar and insensitive person by today’s standards. Because I will be quoting him, it should be expected that there will be some rough language. So, this is an official language warning. While I try to avoid being gratuitous, I don’t want to present a false image of the subject either. If this type of language is a problem for you, then now is the time to tune out. Imagine if you had someone as prolific in battle as Alexander the Great or Julius Caesar, who lived in the twentieth century – with all the information that would be available on their life, there’s simply no way you could contain it al...

41 minSEP 1
Comments
Patton, Part One: Master of the Sword

Almost Episode: The Nine

EImagine for a moment you’re at funeral of a beloved uncle, one of those guys who knew a ton of people, resulting in a massive who’s who of attendees. Then imagine yourself amongst all your other cousin’s and uncles, and other not so distant relatives. Usually something of a cathartic experience amid sadness, right? But now introduce some family drama into the mix. Let’s say there’s some history between you and a few other members. Makes this gathering a bit more uncomfortable, right? But I’m not done. How about your all unimaginable rich and each have enormous standing armies with hundreds of thousands of men. On top of that, all of you know that someone in the near future is going to start a war – but no one know who. Though there are some prime suspects. So much for the funeral – this quaint little family gathering has turned into something far more consequential. Something far more explosive. The event I’m trying to relate is exactly what this Almost Episode is about. Or...

18 minAUG 15
Comments
Almost Episode: The Nine

Tolkien: Myth-Maker In The Somme

Before I dive into the prologue here I want to ask you for a favor. If you have been listening to this little podcast and have enjoyed its content, and feel it has been worth a dollar a month, would you be so kind as to become a patron of the show? I am fairly certain that I will never, ever have formal adds on the show. I think the content discussed here is just too serious. But alas, it isn’t free to produce. There are audio hosting fees, website fees, production costs, plus I have to purchase at least one book per episode typically. This is a passion-hobby for me, so I’ll probably keep this up no matter what, as long as people seem to be interested. But it would be nice if I could at lease get to about cost neutral territory. To be completely transparent – that number is roughly $100 a month. To become a patron, you can find the link on my website at writteninbloodhistory.com, or go to patreon.com/writteninbloodhistory. As a bonus to your patronage you get a shout out that the...

46 minAUG 1
Comments
Tolkien: Myth-Maker In The Somme

Almost Episode: The Boston Molassacre

Before I dive into this Almost Episode, I need to give a shout out to my excellent brother-in-law, Walter. Walter has very generously become my newest patron for the show. And so, as a patron, he gets this shout out, as well as early access to episodes and behind the scenes research I am diving into. For just a buck a month, you too can be like Walter and help me offset the production values of this show such as hosting fees and the cost to obtain research material. To become a patron, you can go to patreon.com/writteninbloodhistory. The following story is one of those freak, and yet totally avoidable disasters. With perhaps just a little but more attention to engineering limitations, a better man in charge, a tad municipal oversight, and a bit more concern for the lives of the poor in Boston, this would never have become one of the most bizarre disaster stories in history. But, like a toddler touching a hot stove, sometimes mankind must burn itself before it learns a lesson. And ev...

13 minJUL 15
Comments
Almost Episode: The Boston Molassacre

Hugh Percy: Kicking the Hornet's Nest

The American War for Independence was my first historical love. When diving into the details of the war, it doesn’t take long to discover all the near misses, and all the opportunities for alternative history. Washington’s coat riddled with bullet holes, Benedict Arnold’s nearly successful plan to sink the entire war effort, the battle of Trenton New Jersey, the arrival of the Baron Von Steuben at Valley Forge, the fog that saved the army escaping New York, the Capture of General Charles Lee, the death of Doctor Warren, the French entering the war. All these things: had a bullet been one inch to the left, or had the wind picked up, or had any one the pivotal men or women not been in a certain place at a certain time – who knows how things would have played out. I have at least one ancestor who fought at Lexington and Concord, John Bosworth – who would have been about 24 at the time. He like so many at the time was a member of the Massachusetts militia and answered the alarm tha...

59 minJUL 1
Comments
Hugh Percy: Kicking the Hornet's Nest

Almost Episode: Supercell Over Grand Island

Before I get going here I need to give a shout out to Erin from Northwest Indiana. She recently signed up to be a patron of the show, and so not only will she be listening to this episode a few days earlier than its official release, she is also owed this particular shout out. Erin, thank you so much – I continue to be amazed that people find my voice tolerable. To learn more about the shows patreon page visit patreon.com/writteninbloodhistory. I am in fact recording this episode exactly 40 years to the day after the events I’m about to describe. I have, for as long as I can remember been somewhat obsessed with tornadoes, and so likewise have long been familiar with what happened in Grand Island, Nebraska. When I began to research if there was enough material to use for the show, I was pleasantly surprised to find that the 40th anniversary was nigh. And so, it was officially added to the lineup. Despite my aforementioned obsession, I likewise acknowledge that tornadoes are probabl...

22 minJUN 15
Comments
Almost Episode: Supercell Over Grand Island
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